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    039 - Analysis, analysis, analysis

    Danny Wills Nov 2 '07 11

    It's hard to sum up one's experience of seven weeks into a few paragraphs for everyone to read. I'll try instead with a few sentences and pictures.

    It's odd here at Cooper. There is so much analysis, so little design and creativity that it's starting to bother me. Sure analysis is great and all.. but when are we encouraged to actually think about what we are doing, personally? No one had been showing anything special in their drawings aside from the fact that it is an assignment, not a experiment or problem solving matter.

    Anyways, I get too negative sometimes. But is that a problem? I can't accept sometimes how things are done. I don't see the strengths in having 1st-4th study other buildings for a semester, in groups let alone. I've been told it will get better, so I'll be looking up.

    But, not to sound too down, it's going well nevertheless. Lectures, NYC, people, events, inspiration.. it's all abound. How are you doing?




    Final reviews..









    more starting here
    My project is the Eames' House, by the way.

     

     
    • 11 Comments

    • Danny WillsDanny Wills
      Nov 2, 07 12:43 pm

      ps, Paul.. if you read this.. is there anyways to change "Kent State University (Danny)" ??

      AP
      Nov 2, 07 2:09 pm

      analysis is so fundamental that you really do need to spend at least a semester focusing on it. in my undergrad program it happened to be the 2nd semester, but i can see the benefit of having it come first. if i understand what they're up to, you'll be on to the making of [abstract] space next semester (cube, matrix etc), but the analysis you're learning now will be applied to everything you do from this point forward. architects can't design in a vacuum, so you really have to map and measure and duly understand your context and constraints in order to create something truly responsible, responsive and meaningful...

      plus, there is some real benefit to understanding how past masters have responded to design problems.

      hope my rant makes sense. best of luck, Danny. i hope to visit your studio sometime early next semester...

      Danny WillsDanny Wills
      Nov 2, 07 2:35 pm

      AP, don't get me wrong, I think it is fundamental as well. But somehow I think they're going into analysis overkill. 4 out of the 5 years are doing almost full semesters of it.

      ps. thanks paul!

      grid
      Nov 2, 07 2:57 pm

      Why can't analysis be design/fun/interjecting your ideas? Find the obscure facts that interest you nobody else knows and go from there. All rem does is analysis. Analysis is more important than know how to make 3d models, nice shapes, etc.

      Make your analysis creative.

      Tom Denney
      Nov 3, 07 12:19 pm

      Danny, analysis is a great skill to have if you can do it well and now how to glen the important bits of conclusions you can draw from the process. Analysis can also act as a generator for many aspects of our project. I under-estimated that value for a long time, and can honestly say I wish my education had included more of it earlier on. I can also see why you might be afraid of having to do it for 4 years. I Assume you are in your first year at C.U. and I agree with what grid says about making it creative. Once you feel comfortable with the ability to pull the necessary bits out of that analysis, the way you show the results or conclusions you draw from it can be some of the greatest images, the way you visually display that information. Also, always remember that they way an architect solves a problem is unique to that particular design. Be careful not to look to solutions for a problem that don't apply to your particular design problem. Taking others good solutions and making a tapestry of your favorites is not good design, but being able to understand why they took the steps they did that lead them to that solution is definitely a good skill, because then you begin to develop your own way of critical thinking that will allow you to take a step and then another and another. I've stepped on slippery stones and lost my balance a few times while in school, but that's the time to do it where you can't get sued. Also, I always remind myself when that happens...it's better to fail having tried then to not do anything and never know.

      nonarchitect
      Nov 4, 07 5:21 pm

      What exactly are you "analysing" ?...as long as you don't have to trace plans and read Foucault and Deleuze at the same time, and you are still capable of forming full grammatical sentences, take the analysis exercise with a pinch of salt...The one thing I have learnt from architecture school is to always out-intimidate the fuzzy thinking faculty !

      le bossman
      Nov 5, 07 3:25 pm

      yes nonarchitect, and we all know how intimidating you made the faculty feel. seriously. no, i'm serious, for real. boy you kept them on their toes.

      analysis is the most important part of learning though, frustrating as it may be at times. i still think about the projects where i had to analyze an rm schindler house or a painting, even as i am working today.

      le bossman
      Nov 6, 07 10:09 am

      sorry n/a i was just messing around

      zivotinja
      Nov 6, 07 2:39 pm

      Yes, working in groups at CU at times can be a nightmare. I have seen it too many times. Maybe you can fight to be alone or change the group since this is the only way you might learn somethings. Yes, Cooper is a special place for better or for worse. I mean this in context of New York and US. If you are clever enough you will figure out what's bad and what's good. Take everything with a pinch of salt. However, this means that you have to have a sharp eye and that you are well read (all round). That's my advice to you.

      strlt_typ
      Nov 6, 07 11:52 pm

      now your kent state stuff are under cooper union...

      A WA W
      Nov 9, 07 1:54 am

      What's the next assignment after the analysis?

      What was the exact assignment?

      I am curious to find out what they asked you...

      Cheers,

      William

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