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Just a friendly reminder to the PMs out there to be really good communicators or at least good at managing project communication. I've been dealing with a bunch that are not and it's not fun. Thank you.

That project we spoke about in October and you sent us stuff to work on based on decisions that we made then ... yeah, we're not doing that stuff anymore and we never talked to you about it, but we've changed the deliverables to something else and it's due in 2 weeks. Oh and I'm leaving on vacation tomorrow and won't be back until after the deadline ... so have fun with that.

Jan 25, 24 12:06 pm  · 
2  · 
proto

ouch

Jan 25, 24 12:48 pm  · 
 · 

I'd find the person who sent me that message and punch them in the groin. Repeatedly.

Jan 25, 24 4:16 pm  · 
1  · 

Paraphrasing I hope or someone very oblivious...?

Jan 27, 24 12:26 am  · 
 · 

paraphrasing ... though somewhat oblivious as well.

Jan 29, 24 7:16 pm  · 
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axonapoplectic

Today’s public meeting I just went to is evidence that we really need political appointees with actual experience/background in the subject matter of committees/boards they are on. Ugh. 

Jan 25, 24 3:52 pm  · 
3  · 
JLC-1

hits close to home - a client of us wanted to get appointed to the design review committee just so she could change the rules and adopt a more californian type of visual code. she believes she's an architect/interior designer/realtor since we built the first house for her, now going on the third.

Jan 25, 24 5:02 pm  · 
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ivanmillya

It's the same problem with state building codes... some of them (for example, energy codes) often take a lot of their input directly from insulation manufacturers, which results in classic headaches such as "You can't use the R-value of the concrete wall as part of your insulation requirements."

Jan 25, 24 5:49 pm  · 
1  · 
Wood Guy

Concrete is R-0.08/in. In what situation would or should that count toward thermal requirements?

Jan 26, 24 4:03 pm  · 
1  · 
archanonymous

@WG depending on your climate zone in California, apparently it's kosher.

Jan 30, 24 4:02 am  · 
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ivanmillya

It could matter in the case of South Florida (climate zone 1), where your prescriptive R-value requirements for mass walls are R-5. Often times my engineers would be able to run performance metrics on the building and calculate out that we wouldn't need any additional insulation beyond the material of the wall (not that you'd want to use no insulation down here for many other reasons, but for energy codes it's... debatable as to its necessity for actual thermal reasons).

Jan 30, 24 6:15 am  · 
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ivanmillya

A practical example: even without using the performance-based values... an 8" 125pcf block carries an R of 2.21 (non-insulated). That's practically nothing in colder climates, but in Zone 1, that's nearly half of the prescriptive requirement just for the block itself. Yes it's a pedantic hill to lay claim to. I was just using it as one example where a lot of modern codes are built with manufacturer's needs in mind, sometimes counter to the humans who live in those buildings. I'm not suggesting that we should do away with insulation in modern buildings.

Jan 30, 24 6:41 am  · 
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wrt archanonymous's comment, I've done work in California where you can get away with an uninsulated, fully grouted 8" CMU wall. Depending on the climate zone and building use ... perfectly fine according to the energy code.

Which is kind of sad that the worst possible building you're legally allowed to build just needs the insulative value of an 8" CMU wall. I feel like we could try a little harder.

Jan 30, 24 12:05 pm  · 
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archanonymous

@EA - we need better carbon lifecycle analysis tools and more awareness, but I'm pretty sure if you assume no heating and cooling, just ventilation, the embodied carbon in insulation will far outweigh energy savings in a non-heating and non-cooling climate. However, Americans are stupid and will still install AC in their 70-78 degree F year-round Cali house because.... because? I don't know. 

I think US comfort standards or just what is seen as baseline in real estate is so unnecessary. Bumping our acceptable indoor high-low temps 1* C through education would have an enormous effect on energy usage. (OMG I'm becoming Jimmy Carter)

Feb 1, 24 4:47 am  · 
2  · 

Good point. Also, whole building LCA's are coming to CALGreen. Well ... a whole building LCA or a prescriptive requirement to get some EPDs showing you meet a reduction in GWP that the state set at a level that I think is so super easy to achieve that the requirement is to basically collect some paperwork. But I'm sure someone will try to do a whole building LCA at some point.

Feb 1, 24 2:00 pm  · 
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Hi TC! This may be better for Politics Central (?) but ICYMI, Norman Foster doesn't agree/believe that architecture is a machine to impose capitalism...

Jan 27, 24 12:29 am  · 
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gwharton

Then Foster is correct.

Jan 29, 24 7:42 pm  · 
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ivanmillya

He's very reductive in his answer. Basically "Oh architecture can't be a tool that's used to impose capitalism, look at these examples of non-traditionally capitalist ("Socialist!") countries that have architecture!"

Jan 30, 24 6:27 am  · 
1  · 

Foster may be reductive, however he is correct on this.

Jan 30, 24 10:55 am  · 
1  · 
JLC-1

maybe not capitalism, but it sure has become a tool for globalization/homogenization, I mean, every new project anywhere looks the same boring wavy tower or transparent box with sprinkles.

Jan 30, 24 12:50 pm  · 
1  · 

Oh hush pessimistic old person. ;)

Now excuse me, I have some clouds to yell at.  

Jan 30, 24 12:53 pm  · 
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gwharton

Foster's point, which I briefly and glibly agreed with, is that architecture reflects and expresses culture. It doesn't impose anything on its own. It reifies it. In re globalism / capitalism / neoliberalism / managerialism or whatever else you want to call our ruling oligarchic order, architecture is expressing that in physical form as a consequence of its dominance, not a cause. That culture/order is sterile, homogenous and dehumanizing, yes. So is the architecture produced in response to that. QED.

Jan 30, 24 1:15 pm  · 
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JLC-1

that's an interesting point, makes me think of what happens after wars in bombed cities. berlin is the prefect example of how many ways you have to afford the issue. My experience from a highly seismic country is that you lose a lot of history to developers just for the sake of making money. New urbanism on the other hand has been a tool for installing a foreign model in several parts of the world.

Jan 30, 24 1:44 pm  · 
1  · 

As you said JLC, it's about the money. Not the architecture.

Look at Prague - they are actively doing developments that look like the architectural style pre WW2.  It's all done with modern assemblies/ codes and use historically appropriate materials.  

I spoke with a few architects while in Prague about this development.  All agreed that it costs between 1.5 and 2x what a modern aesthetic would.  

Jan 30, 24 2:02 pm  · 
1  · 
gwharton

I think the money thing is a second-order effect. The deeper issue is our global managerial system's view of ideal social order and human nature, where everything is easily quantifiable in spreadsheets and the ideal citizen is an interchangeable, fungible economic unit to be moved around in a universal, logical system under managerial expert direction with maximum predictability and efficiency and minimal deviation or personality. Money comes into it because as a ubiquitous medium of exchange, it meets all of those idealized requirements as a basis for social order and interaction.

Jan 30, 24 2:12 pm  · 
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gwharton

Money then becomes the universal proxy measure of value in our society simply because it is quantifiable, universal, and fungible. Real human values are typically none of those things, which makes managers and bureaucrats and accountants extremely uncomfortable.

Jan 30, 24 2:15 pm  · 
2  · 

gwharton, you're not saying this view of the world is *good*, correct? Just that it is what it is?

Jan 30, 24 2:31 pm  · 
1  · 
gwharton

That's correct. I am simply describing it how it is.

Jan 30, 24 3:21 pm  · 
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proto

It would be good if we as people could assess Value in another way. But we have yet to articulate it in a way that makes it compelling to society as a whole. And we end up measuring everything in dollars whether that is the correct measuring tool or not.

Jan 30, 24 4:28 pm  · 
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TBH, I think we are driven as a society by emotion as much as by money (maybe even more). Teams, political groups, points of view, are all about emotion. Money is entangled, but especially right now even money will not sway opinions (FWIW, neither will a rational argument). But switch on the right emotion and the world goes nuts. That's how Sam Bankman-Fried was able to swindle so many, and in the end its why a politician can lose two court cases on sexual assault charges and still be a contender for president of the USA. Its also why so many people spend so much time making sure everyone knows which group a person is supposed to be in. Threads on archinect are filled with those kinds of comments. FWIW, I think the question to Foster was naive and leading, and he gave a good answer.

Jan 31, 24 10:56 am  · 
3  · 

I think the majority of people are driven by ego. IE - the emotion of wanting to be important and / or unique. If someone can appeal to that aspect of other then it's easy to direct them to do or believe almost anything.

Jan 31, 24 5:06 pm  · 
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Thanks for the great discussions and thoughtful engagement folks! To be clear I tend to agree with the larger points made but also agree that his answer was glib and that a counterpoint could be that almost every profession/service provider is in some way used by capitalism to impose "it's" will...

Jan 31, 24 10:28 pm  · 
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Or perhaps more simply the problem is not architecture its capitalism...

Jan 31, 24 11:55 pm  · 
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Yes, nice discussion. The answer was not really glib in my opinion. The question was based on a political position with a specific point of view and he didnt agree. He implies it is a lot of words without actions, and just wrong when looked at factually. Maybe he could have spoken to the ideas behind the point of view, but at the level of architecture as a practice he is pretty much correct. Architecture is political but it is not the head, its the tail.

Feb 1, 24 11:27 am  · 
1  · 
gwharton

I think it's important to distinguish between capitalism, which is really only just an organizational system of economic relationships/transactions and nothing else, with the political ruling order under which modern "capitalism" is just a small part of its "political formula" and is operating (something far broader and more comprehensive in its form and function). The creation of architecture, as an economic activity of design and construction, is definitely shaped by and reflects the constraints of capital economy. But its reification of the ruling order's culture and political formula is distinct from that. "Capitalist" architecture in the 19th century was vastly different from "capitalist" architecture now. What changed is the ruling order and its institutional culture.

Feb 1, 24 12:14 pm  · 
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JLC-1

gwharton, China is the prime example of your point, the communist country by definition expanding their influence in africa and southamerica through capital construction projects.

Feb 1, 24 1:37 pm  · 
1  · 

I saw the movie Origin tonight and it was devastating. So beautifully made but so difficult to watch. 

Jan 29, 24 11:44 pm  · 
1  · 
Wood Guy

It's on my list. It seems that having someone to punch down on is human nature...

Jan 31, 24 9:56 am  · 
1  · 

I don't know if I could handle a movie like that right now.

Jan 31, 24 11:22 am  · 
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It's ultimately pretty hopeful, IMO, Chad, if that helps (the glimpses of Trayvon Martin in it are heartbreaking). It's well worth seeing.

Jan 31, 24 2:10 pm  · 
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I'm sure it is. I just can't deal with anymore death right now. Yeah, I know I sound wimpy.

Jan 31, 24 4:34 pm  · 
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JLC-1

bump to ask how is it going in the city of angels? I've seen LA river running wild in videos. And this...https://www.instagram.com/reel...

Feb 6, 24 12:08 pm  · 
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sameolddoctor

The river is pretty filled up, Im gonna go see at lunchtime. I hope there were no unhoused people in there when the flash floods started. It is sad to see all the water just drain to the pacific when it could have been conserved for use.

As for the mudslides etc, they mostly happen up in the hills where the wealthy live, so even though its sad, I have a tiny violin I use for them

Feb 6, 24 12:34 pm  · 
2  · 

I'm curious how much of the flood water could be salvaged for reuse. I think that some amount of fresh water runoff is needed to balance the hydrological cycle.

Feb 6, 24 1:51 pm  · 
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sameolddoctor

Some amount is, for sure, but the way the river has been engineered with a concrete base in about 95% of its length ensures that there is almost no ground water recharge, except in some limited areas. 

There are numerous plans to "soft-bottom" the river bed but it has been done in only about 3-4 miles of the nearly 100+ miles. In any case it is sad to see all the water run off then us having to pump water from Northern California and the Colorado River to run LA.

Feb 6, 24 2:30 pm  · 
2  · 
JLC-1

california is weird, in tahoe you can't cover more than 30% of your land with house or impervious surfaces - I'd be curious to see what's the ratio in the hills of LA.

Feb 6, 24 2:59 pm  · 
 · 

Thanks for the info SOD! I appreciate your insight on this. I've only lived out west (CO) for nine years. It's still weird to me how this part of the country deals with water.

Then again, I used to live next to Lake Superior so not having enough water wasn't an issue.  ;) 

Feb 6, 24 4:14 pm  · 
2  · 
archanonymous

I'll explain it to you Chad from the perspective of someone born in Colorado: 

All the water falls on Colorado. California and Arizona steal it. The end.

Feb 7, 24 7:01 am  · 
5  · 

I'm sure the Colorado River Compact 1922, and the fact that no one listened to the hydrologists when it was written had nothing to do with it.

Feb 7, 24 10:25 am  · 
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sameolddoctor

As i said, the LA hydrology system is quite crazy. Here are a few before/after pics, just 2 days apart (during the "storm" and after).

Pity to let all that water go...

Feb 9, 24 11:59 am  · 
2  · 

LA's stepchild, the concrete lining of LA River once again saved the city's ass. Great pictures doc! I agree, we still need to implement ideas to retain some of that water going to the Pacific.

Feb 9, 24 12:16 pm  · 
1  · 
Bench

Wow thanks for the pics, thats wild

Feb 9, 24 1:15 pm  · 
1  · 
sameolddoctor

Soft-bottoming more and more of the river would go a long way Orhan

Feb 9, 24 1:43 pm  · 
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So...I've been out of architecture practice for about three years now; I'm in a multi-office nonprofit organization. I completely love my job, and my organization is incredibly progressive and generous, so this is no slam on them. But oh boy let me tell you: the level of business-ey jargon outside of architecture is just unrelenting! Every day it's like "strategic implementation matrix" this and "theory of change areas of focus" that and I know architects have a jargon but at least ours applies to physical things?!?!  I'm drowning. 

Feb 7, 24 10:54 am  · 
1  · 
bowling_ball

"Can you please explain what that means, without using the jargon?"

Feb 7, 24 11:47 am  · 
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JLC-1

when I moved to the states 21 years ago I couldn't understand half of the architects' jargon and none of the acronyms. Language is a virus.

Feb 7, 24 12:01 pm  · 
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sameolddoctor

Oh right Donna, I thought architects were bad but working with MBA types is a whole another trip. Too much jargon, too little work (at least in my experience)

Feb 7, 24 12:05 pm  · 
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Non Sequitur

working for government "clients" is even worse. Everything has it's own 3 to 6 letter acronym and people keep regurgitating listicles of requirements using nothing but letters yet hardly anyone knows what they are. (very very few who work for the government actually know what they are doing. Most are there simply to fill seats). It gets worst with security terms. We had to adopt acronyms for certain parts of buildings to mask their true use... then the acronyms become so common that we had to further abbreviate them. Now we simply can't talk about them at all.

Feb 7, 24 12:28 pm  · 
4  · 

If I ever hear someone saying that we need to circle back to make sure we have synergy and ensure strategic implementation our core mission I'd probably punch them in the face.

Feb 7, 24 12:42 pm  · 
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Chad, we need to circle back on your attitude.

Feb 7, 24 2:18 pm  · 
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LOL Josh.

Feb 7, 24 2:38 pm  · 
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abracadabra

After listening my rant about this, an administrative friend told me “b b baby you ain’t seen nothin yet” !

Feb 7, 24 3:19 pm  · 
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sameolddoctor

Not to be a negative nancy, but I am gonna have you guys do a pencils-down on this issue. Lets circle the wagons in the morning.

Feb 7, 24 9:01 pm  · 
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::cracks knuckles:: I warned you all.

Feb 8, 24 10:05 am  · 
1  · 
sameolddoctor

Chad I need to send you a HR training video regarding unwarranted micro-aggressive behavior. This type of "outta the box" thinking is what we do not need thanks.

Feb 8, 24 2:04 pm  · 
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.


Feb 8, 24 2:43 pm  · 
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Academia isn't any better :(

Feb 7, 24 2:08 pm  · 
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SneakyPete

What happened to b3ta?

Feb 8, 24 7:12 pm  · 
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The same thing that happened x-jla.

Feb 9, 24 10:11 am  · 
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Bench

wasn't beta an admin too? is this something donna can chip in info?

Feb 9, 24 10:33 am  · 
1  · 

I didn't know he was an admin. I hope he's OK.

Feb 9, 24 10:58 am  · 
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Non Sequitur

X popped in last week to post a picture in the food thread.

Feb 9, 24 11:03 am  · 
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I know x is back. His time out is over.

Feb 9, 24 11:44 am  · 
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Archinect

We were concerned too so we reached out. He's fine, he just changed his screen name, and seems to be taking a break. Rumors of him being banned are about as false as all other moderation rumors posted in the forum.

Feb 9, 24 1:17 pm  · 
8  · 

That's good! 

Just to be clear - when I said time out - I meant taking a break from the forums, NOT a banning.  Sorry that was confusing.  

Feb 9, 24 1:49 pm  · 
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Now I kind of want to know about the other moderation rumors.

 Come on Archinect, gossip! ;)

Feb 9, 24 1:56 pm  · 
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Non Sequitur

and the big green head graces us once more with it's holy presence.

Feb 9, 24 2:00 pm  · 
1  · 

I love when Big Green Head checks in! b3ta is fine, we've texted this week. Thank you guys for the concern! Non I wish I knew some good rumors. Instead I'll give you this, ins't at least one of these folks Canadian? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y3ywicffOj4

Feb 10, 24 2:14 pm  · 
1  · 

Come on Donna, we all suspect the the BGH (all praise its glory) and the admins are in some type of secrete cabal like a cross between the Illuminati and Scientology. :)

Feb 11, 24 3:37 pm  · 
1  · 

Since January 3rd I've only had one full day off and have been putting in 55 hour weeks.  Fortunately this project is due on Tuesday and I will not be doing this much overtime for another year. 

Feb 10, 24 1:38 pm  · 
5  · 

Hang in there Chad! I've been working every weekend in 2024, some longer hours than others, but the end is in sight for both of us! You got this!

Feb 10, 24 2:20 pm  · 
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pandahut

Sorry to hear, Chad. Hope you can get a quick break to hit some fresh pow
der, it's dumping today!

Feb 10, 24 3:39 pm  · 
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I'll be going cc skiing tomorrow morning before coming into the office. I hope to get in 8-10 miles.

Feb 10, 24 5:55 pm  · 
3  · 
bowling_ball

@chad how long is the commute? Sadly my would-be route doesn't yet have any snow, but I'm thinking about it for next year. By roads it's 7km, probably 5km (3mi) by frozen river from my house to office

Feb 10, 24 11:06 pm  · 
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It's up on the Grand Mesa - about an hour from my house. I got in ten miles today.



Feb 11, 24 3:31 pm  · 
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bowling_ball

Wow. Those views alone are worth it! Feeling jealous from the prairies.

Feb 11, 24 3:53 pm  · 
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Non Sequitur

Winter in my area is measured by the number of days our canal skating is open. Last year was zero days. This year was less than 48hr. Almost no more snow… hopefully this does not mess up the maple harvest. Nice pics Chad.

Feb 11, 24 4:39 pm  · 
 · 

Thanks for the kind comments. It's all above 10,00 ft (3,048m) so some days I feel the elevation. I live at 4.800 ft. If anyone is in the area and wants to do some cc skiing just let me know! I'm happy to take people out and / or recommend trails.

Feb 11, 24 6:14 pm  · 
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proto

Cool to see that in the winter…do you climb the road? Or is it cleared and you just ski the top?

Feb 11, 24 7:37 pm  · 
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That's not a road. It's a groomed skate / Nordic ski trail right at the trailhead. Hence why it's so wide.  ::insert joke here::

There are around 60 miles of groomed trails in that area. There are another 25 miles of backcountry (not groomed) trails. I'll ski both when I can. Of course you go slower on the backcountry stuff with 6' of snow and fatter skis but the downhill sections are much steeper. ;)

Feb 11, 24 7:58 pm  · 
2  · 

I downhill skied as a teen but wasn’t a fan. I CC skied a few times in my 30s and loooooved it. Chad your pics are beautiful! So glad you got some time out in nature, it helps!

Feb 12, 24 6:23 am  · 
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Well the fire station project drawings went out yesterday. Not the real fun begins as the contractor bids it and creates a GMP.

Feb 14, 24 10:59 am  · 
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archiwutm8

I took some ceramic classes and this is what I’ve been missing. The creativity and ability to make things again with my own very hands. Going to look at longer courses to destress myself instead of spending thousands on holidays abroad.

Feb 13, 24 9:31 am  · 
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citizen

What a great reminder about alternatives for enjoyment and stress reduction.

But if Patrick Swayze joins you at the potter's wheel, be careful   ;O]

Feb 13, 24 3:27 pm  · 
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Or be happy? No judgement.

Feb 13, 24 3:42 pm  · 
1  · 

I'd let Patrick join me.

Feb 14, 24 1:56 pm  · 
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curtkram

ya, no. we need patrick swayze defending us in red dawn, not messing up pottery.

Feb 14, 24 5:18 pm  · 
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Bench

Ive been preaching similar ideas to young architects around me the last few years. Get a hobby that you enjoy for the shear enjoyment of it. Not everything needs to revolve around architecture. Make friends who aren't architects. You're allowed to be a multi-dimensional person.

Feb 14, 24 5:32 pm  · 
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I'll take that one step further Bench. Have friends outside of the architectural field.

Feb 14, 24 5:36 pm  · 
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pandahut

Bencharoni hitting the nail on the head. multi-dimensional person. When you ask an American what they do they will tell you, I am an Architect! When you ask a European what they do they will tell you they swim, play instruments, laugh at silly Americans! but in all seriousness, hobbies and friends outside of the profession is a critical way t o live this life and not be overwhelmed and consumed with the industry.

Feb 14, 24 6:16 pm  · 
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I had to think about this for a minute. I only have four friends who are architects. One of them is a sibling. One I work with. The others live on opposite sides of the country than me. Other than that I don't socialize with anyone in the field outside of the office.

Feb 14, 24 7:18 pm  · 
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citizen

I just got home from a quick run to RiteAid and the grocery store.  In both places I saw quite a few people, women and men, and even a few kids, buying flowers, balloons, and the last of the cards to take home to their valentines.  For some reason I felt kind of nice, imagining all the hugs and smooches at the end of all this.  This doesn't normally occur to me in that way, seeing others.

I must be getting squishy in my late (late!) middle age.

Feb 14, 24 9:52 pm  · 
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SneakyPete

Chad, is that you over on MP?

Feb 15, 24 8:55 pm  · 
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Probably?

Feb 20, 24 7:06 pm  · 
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SneakyPete

I was just reading the thread on the rapist and saw you. You do rock as well as mountains?

Feb 21, 24 9:11 am  · 
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I only do rock climbing. No mountaineering or ice.

Feb 21, 24 10:02 am  · 
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SneakyPete

Nice. I stopped when my daughter was born but I really miss it.

Feb 21, 24 11:16 pm  · 
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ill_will

I just suggested a rebranding on a survey at this new-ish (4months) job I have. I think I used the words "rebrand to a more professional appearance". I'm pretty sure I'll be fine (not fired?). Our CEO sits super close proximity to my desk and *inherited* the firm from her father, not sure what to expect, if anything.

Feb 20, 24 5:49 pm  · 
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JLC-1

whatever happens, let us know. what is it un-professional right now?

Feb 20, 24 6:06 pm  · 
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ill_will

My orientation was given to me someone wearing sandals and jeans... in November. I guess it's technically a legacy firm now, but both the kids are the CEO and CTO with no architectural background. Maybe I'm a little more used to a more enforced business casual, but this is just plain casual. It's also not a small firm either, like 300 people or so. Our logo sucks too, like we even need one LOL.

Feb 21, 24 10:21 am  · 
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ill_will

I got HR to let me redo the survey, so this time I'll be gentler too.

Feb 21, 24 10:23 am  · 
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I really want to know what firm this is . . . .

Feb 21, 24 3:34 pm  · 
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I do too! I love a bad logo!

Feb 21, 24 9:36 pm  · 
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Non Sequitur

Can I change my vote to Dick Busch on the Pritzker discussion?

Feb 22, 24 12:00 am  · 
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Wood Guy

That green thing at the tip doesn't look good. They might want to get it looked at.

Feb 22, 24 8:28 am  · 
1  · 

So my dad passed in December and I've been on the phone with lots of financial folks working out the inheritance process and I have to say these banker-investment-types have NO people skills. They're all jargon and Jersey accents.

Feb 21, 24 9:26 am  · 
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axonapoplectic

Also went through this recently. Can commiserate. Took over 2 years to sort everything out.

Feb 21, 24 9:57 am  · 
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ill_will

Sorry for your loss

Feb 21, 24 10:22 am  · 
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sameolddoctor

Sorry for your loss

Feb 21, 24 11:52 am  · 
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Wood Guy

I'm sorry for your loss, Donna. As annoying as the process may be, it could be worse. My dad died penniless in 2011; we didn't even bother with the probate process. Wells Fargo let him take out mortgages worth far more than his home, with no way to pay them back, and hounded me for years afterwards to repay his loans. Fuck that company.

Feb 21, 24 2:00 pm  · 
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I'm sorry, Wood Guy, that sounds awful. One of the people we spoke with today said to my sister "I sent you the form by email. Look for the email with a little paper clip on it." Um, yeah, lady. I've opened an email since 1996, I know how attachments work.

Feb 21, 24 9:36 pm  · 
3  · 
Wood Guy

Thanks, I didn't mean to make it about me, just that when someone dies the aftermath sucks no matter the situation. I'm not sure whether it's funny or sad that they thought your sister didn't know how to operate her email!

Feb 22, 24 8:27 am  · 
1  · 
sameolddoctor

Mom passed just before the pandemic here in CA, but we are from a different country where her bank accounts etc still exist. Still havent closed them as it will take quite a while to get things sorted. At least she still lives on in the Bank's records!

Feb 25, 24 8:10 pm  · 
1  · 
gwharton

My dad passed a year ago January, and I am STILL trying to sort out all the accounts and other financial bullsh*t. Sigh.

Feb 26, 24 2:43 pm  · 
1  · 

I'm sorry for your loss Donna. I'm probably going to loose my father in the next year. I can relate to what you're going though. No matter how old you are you never think of your father as a mortal who gets hurt or sick. It's tough.

Feb 26, 24 6:42 pm  · 
1  · 

Exactly, Chad. Growing up the attitude of my sister and me was always “Daddy can do anything!” And he did, he was an amazing and supportive father in every way. He actually went out on his own terms, surrounded by his grandchildren, and it was as good a death as one could hope for.

Feb 26, 24 9:17 pm  · 
 · 
citizen

I'm sorry to hear about your dad, Donna. Bless you and your whole family.

Feb 27, 24 1:49 am  · 
1  · 
midlander

my sympathies Donna. my parents both died during the pandemic. even for a middle aged adult it changes your life and understanding of the world.

Feb 27, 24 11:42 am  · 
 · 
midlander

wood guy - my mom opened a handful of credit card accounts in her last year and maxed them all out before dying. i kind of admire her fuck-you to the world on the way out - it's amazing banks let people do this. 2 years later and the estate is still in probate... our lawyer is from providence and has a wicked strong boston accent, which cheers me up because it's so appalling. we're strangers IRL, but i cherish all of you - a toast to the grief of love.

Feb 27, 24 11:51 am  · 
1  · 

Good morning from the front porch. 35° F.

Feb 25, 24 9:24 am  · 
10  · 
SneakyPete

I'd lend you the 30 extra degrees we have on mine, but then I'd need to put on pants.

Feb 25, 24 6:53 pm  · 
2  · 
citizen

^ What are these "pants" of which you speak?

Feb 27, 24 1:47 am  · 
2  · 
ill_will

This weekend it hit 70 degrees in the midwest!

Feb 27, 24 11:09 am  · 
1  · 
JLC-1

this is awful and arrogant, beside being AI generated  https://archinect.com/firms/pr...

Feb 27, 24 2:49 pm  · 
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The design brief of those images has a 'unique' take on reality.

I'm trying to be more positive in my life.  ;)

Feb 27, 24 4:05 pm  · 
1  · 

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