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3dsmax and architectural visualisation

KingUwerhi

hi, I want to learn to photorealistic renderings, I'm just fairly new to the 3d game. For a while I've been learning SketchUp, but a friend of mine recommended 3dsmax for it's renderings and animation. I looked it up and it's pretty good, but I've just gotten the hang of things with modeling on Revit and SketchUp, I want to know if it's possible to learn just rendering on 3dsmax, or do I have to go through all the basics from modeling and beyond

 
Apr 16, 20 4:36 pm
Almosthip

Our office uses revit to render the building and than we do all our post production in Gymp (which is free photoshop)

You really dont need to learn 3dstudiomax


Apr 16, 20 4:46 pm  · 
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Haha Hadude

You can get nice renders out of Revit or Sketchup with the right render program and post production, but it's not worth your time. 3ds will be a much better program for what you're trying to achieve.

Apr 16, 20 5:01 pm  · 
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KingUwerhi

Oh so you're saying its best to work on 3dsmax? What if I wanted to import works from other CADs to render, is it possible to learn just rendering on 3dsmax an create the models elsewhere?

Apr 16, 20 9:20 pm  · 
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Almosthip

I disagree, Its the post production that makes renderings pop. Not the rendering program. You are already creating the building in revit to produce construction documents. Who has the time or the Fees to create it again in 3dstudiomax? My clients would never pay for such a waste of time

Apr 17, 20 11:18 am  · 
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KingUwerhi

Oh wow

Apr 17, 20 11:29 am  · 
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KingUwerhi

Thank you very much for this

Apr 17, 20 11:29 am  · 
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Non Sequitur

^you can import your revit model into 3Ds and output renderings pretty easily. We have someone in our office who spends almost all his time doing this type of work.

Apr 17, 20 11:29 am  · 
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Almosthip

In our small office we certainty cant afford to a rendering guy. We have less than 14 staff including engineers and office manager. We have 5 technologist, all of whom are expected to take a project from design to contract completion. This includes the pretty pictures. I am the only on with any 3dmax experience. My point being you dont need to learn another program to produce photo quality renderings. The post production skills are way more important than what program renders the building.

Apr 17, 20 11:42 am  · 
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Non Sequitur

I agree with your post-production points, as I do that all the time, but it's not a big time commitment to drop a revit model in 3Ds, make some material tweaks and press the render button... but this is typically not your average arch tech's skill set. Ours, for example, can do this well enough but lacks any sense of scale or context. Sure, let's put in cars (euro models too) facing the wrong way on the street and max every surface to 100% mirror. Also, that tropical sky will look great for a southern ontario local. Still have to tune that out post rendering anyways.

Apr 17, 20 12:14 pm  · 
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Almosthip

I actually made one of guys take pictures of the Alberta sky from one of our tallest (only 12 stories) buildings because I was so tired of inappropriate skys. Not every rendering needs a dynamic sunset sky.....

Apr 17, 20 1:25 pm  · 
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Non Sequitur

Ahip, for the longest time, back when I was doing lots of post-production images, I kept reusing the same 3 sky pictures I took while out west: Tofino Pacific Ocean horizon, Banff NP treeline, Sask wheatfield sky. Those 3 are still used by others in the office today and love recognizing them in images even when not related. Our office did get slammed a few years back when someone used the wrong night sky for a competition in the Territories. That's sorta important up there. My current favorite is crystal clear tropical water material maps for the St-Laurence river.

Apr 17, 20 2:01 pm  · 
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SneakyPete

enscape out of revit with a good model and some quality materials.

Jan 6, 21 2:22 am  · 
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SneakyPete

3dstudio max is a modelling and animation program. It used to use Mental Ray for rendering, now ships with a new in house rendering engine.

Many renderers use vray, which is its own rendering engine. It has plugins for most architecture software, as do the other more popular rendering engines.

If you don't need the scene setup / camera controls or the animating elements, 3dsmax is really expensive and you still need the renderer you want, unless you like the one that comes with 3ds. 

Apr 17, 20 12:22 pm  · 
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frostfrog

Using 3dsMax in architectural visualization usually means paying for 3dsMax subscription + Render Engine (Vray, Corona, Redshift, Octane, etc.) + Powerful PC which is ridiculous amount that small office can't afford to.

Some studios can't even afford AutoCAD on every computer they have (seriously)

If you are after low budget, I would recommend Blender + Cycles / EEVEE / Octane.

If I remember, Octane for Blender is free for non-commercial use.

However, if you really want to achieve "photo realistic" and standard pipe-line in architectural visualization, 3dsMax + Vray is most popular.

Apr 17, 20 9:29 pm  · 
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