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What are you reading (to your children)?

Lately, my daughter has been getting a lot of Maurice Sendak's Nutshell Library, specifically One was Johnny and Alligators all around. She's not a fan of Pierre.


 
Sep 19, 17 12:01 pm
Non Sequitur

This is one of my favorites

If You Happen To Have A Dinosaur by Linda Bailey

Sep 19, 17 12:05 pm
MomReadsDaily

This book looks great i put it on my list of books to read.

chigurh

The house in the night has awesome illustrations, as does Good night moon - classic 60s pop art graphics and colors.  Dragons love tacos is tight, Iggy Peck architect is the worst.  Age dependent.  




Sep 19, 17 12:07 pm

Of course, she also gets Iggy Peck, Architect and Ada Twist, Scientist due to her parents' professions, and we throw in Rosie Revere, Engineer to round it out.


Sep 19, 17 12:07 pm

I also love Harold and the Purple Crayon

Sep 19, 17 12:10 pm
Non Sequitur

Also a favorite

Sep 19, 17 1:23 pm
MomReadsDaily

I can't lie I choose books from the look of the cover and I love this cover so bright and vibrant, I have added this book to my soon to read book list thanks.

Justin Turdo

My son loves this book

randomised

This is awesome people, keep 'em coming! (fresh dad here)

Sep 19, 17 1:40 pm
won and done williams

Currently to my five year old:

To my seven year old:

And my favorite kids book of all time:


Sep 19, 17 2:48 pm
MomReadsDaily

I will be adding the Eloise and Runaway Ralph to my soon to read list thanks for the picks hopefully my son loves them .

The Story of Buildings.  This one is beautifully illustrated, and engagingly written.  Great stories for 6-12 year-olds.

Sep 19, 17 2:58 pm
Smile of Fury

My 21-month-old loves these:


Anything from Sandra Boynton automatically gets donated out of my house.

Sep 19, 17 3:18 pm

Mr. Plumbean and the Big Orange Splot is lovely for giving a sense of personal love for your home. 

Roberto the Insect Architect is an excellent social justice story with clever puns.

The Lorax because it's the smartest book ever written.

The original Magic Schoolbus series - the Classic books, not the later iterations - are dense and beautiful and full of so much nerdy information. Loved them.

The Snowy Day made me want to live in the city.

Next week is Banned Book Week! So check out Walter the Farting Dog, which we *loved* even though it uses the word "fart" or "farting" twenty-four times! (The horror!)

Sep 19, 17 3:24 pm
chigurh

richard scarry is cool.

Sep 19, 17 3:36 pm
JLC-1

last I checked my 16 yr old had read most of stephen king's, and the 21 yr old was reading some neuroscience stuff for class.

Sep 19, 17 3:41 pm
randomised

This one is on my list for when the time is ready:



It's about Constant's New Babylon, don't know if an international version is in the works, I hope so though.

Sep 20, 17 7:35 am
randomised

And this one was a favourite of my niece, about a little mole who wants to find out who shat on his head, his haircut looks very current affairs somehow ;)






Sep 20, 17 7:40 am

The Hobbit at around age 4-5, I think. A slow start but once you get going ...

Sep 20, 17 8:39 am
tintt

FORTUNATELY, THE MILK

Image result for fortunately the milk

and Skippy Jon Jones, Lost in Spice

Image result for lost in spice

Sep 20, 17 9:38 am

Oh god those Skippyjon Jones books are SO FUN to read out loud! When my boy was old enough to read himself we would argue over who got to read them out loud at his bedtime.

Sep 20, 17 10:20 am
Non Sequitur

I've got Dawkins' "The Magic of Reality" cued up for when my 15mo old starts asking questions. Might not be for a while, but that's ok. It's beautifully illustrated.:



Sep 20, 17 10:25 am

they go to the library each week and pick their own books

Sep 20, 17 10:38 am
tintt

I am reading this

Image result for the halloween tree

Sep 20, 17 12:59 pm

Also Zen Shorts has a beautiful message and gorgeous illustrations. 


Sep 20, 17 1:03 pm
Sam Apoc

Room on the Broom is a fun one to read aloud as well:


Sep 20, 17 2:24 pm
won and done williams

A few other favs:

We also found this at the public library by Don Freeman, the author of the original Corduroy; however, I think it's out of print. Anything by Freeman is incredible, but this was particularly good (and well illustrated).

Donna already mentioned it, but wanted to get a photo up - Ezra Jack Keats wrote about growing up in a city like no other. All his books are wonderful:


Sep 21, 17 8:51 am
MomReadsDaily

Wow funny you posted this I just picked this book up, we will be reading it this week on youtube it was one of the librarians finds for me.

chigurh

fox in socks

Sep 21, 17 11:18 am
shellarchitect

working on the magic treehouse series for the 5 year old. 

llama llama series for the 1 1/2 year old

Sep 21, 17 1:02 pm
jla-x

just finished reading To Kill a Mocking bird with my 10yo.  Before that, my wife read Catcher in the Rye and Lord of the Flies, Tom Sawyer, and Of Mice and Men.  We are covering all the classics...

Sep 21, 17 2:29 pm
tintt

Of Mice and Men is one of the worst books I've ever read. Get it out of the way early I guess?

It's Banned Books Week! Two more good banned books for kids:

1. For 3rd grade on or so, Harriet the Spy by Louise Fitzhugh. Banned because it challenged gender role norms for the time, and the girl protagonist is a badass.

2, For about 8th grade and beyond, The Absolutely True Diary of A Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexei. One of my favorite books ever, and loved by my son too, but banned because it - horrors! - mentions that masturbation is normal and fun.


Sep 25, 17 11:35 am
randomised

Didn't know the USA, land of the free etc. is banning children's books while Mein Kampf is readily available...not saying that it is a children's book of course.

Sep 25, 17 2:19 pm

I tell my children about the strange emails I get from people trying to entrap me. They love that.

Sep 25, 17 2:23 pm
mantaray
HARRIET THE SPY WAS BANNED??! Omg that is so depressing. That book was one of the first, and upon reflection one of the FEW, books that resonated with me personally BECAUSE it was a female protagonist with her own thang going on. Ah FFS.

This thread is awesome. Besides the classics/ those already mentioned (more cheers for Richard scarry and the "little men/miss" series!) we've recently discovered the following delightful books:

Good Night Owl (by Greg Pizzoli)--very fun to read/act out and the illustrations are JUST RIGHT
https://www.amazon.com/Good-Night-Owl-Greg-Pizzoli/dp/1484712757

Carson Ellis' "Home" (about all different kinds of homes, beautiful rendered)
Sep 25, 17 6:09 pm
friend

she really enjoys big pop up books.

this one is The Architecture Pack. a bit older but still good.


Sep 26, 17 7:07 pm

I love librarians ... Melania Trump sent ten Dr. Seuss books to an elementary school library in Cambridge, MA. This was the librarian's response.

I'm including this from the end of the response because of the theme of the thread: "In return, I’m attaching a list of ten books (it’s the librarian in me) that I hope will offer you a window into the lives of the many children affected by the policies of your husband’s administration. You and your husband have a direct impact on these children’s lives. Please make time to learn about and value them."

Sep 26, 17 8:07 pm

I wasn't even the first to bring adult themes up in this thread. 

I think the adult themes have always been there, this librarian was just pointing them out to someone who seemed oblivious to them.


Here are My Hands is what I've been reading to my daughter recently.

Nov 24, 17 10:42 pm
RickB-Astoria

My suggestion is that at some point when they begin to have some grasp of language that you ween them off of depending on you to read and have them begin the process of reading for themselves and in turn encourage them to be self-learners. 

I agree with the idea of beginning with reading for them but before long, they need to learn to read and be encouraged to do so on their own initiative so if they want to read something or learn something, that they should be encouraged to take it on themselves to learn. This way, they aren't depending on you to learn but become self-dependent on their learning. That is one of the best skills they can learn to develop because that is what they can take with them throughout their life.


Nov 25, 17 2:24 am
Wood Guy

I don't have kids but a good friend's father has written and illustrated a lot of popular kid's books, including this one: http://davidmcphailillustratio...

And I just finished a gut renovation and new studio for this author/illustrator: http://melissasweet.net/?book=....

Dec 9, 17 3:23 pm

The stack this week. 


Dec 9, 17 7:16 pm
dominiond

Mixed up Files of Ms. Basil E Frankweiler ( I loved this one when I was a kid)

Rad Women Worldwide

Dog Man



Dec 9, 17 9:31 pm

Rad Women Worldwide sounds similar to another book, Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls. IIRC, there is a chapter on Zaha Hadid.


Dec 11, 17 6:07 pm
tintt

Image result for the big fat cow that goes kapow

quick and cute

Jan 14, 18 10:59 pm
tintt

Frog and Toad. There is a great story about overcoming procrastination. Toad is anxious about all the things he has to do and can't relax. Frog suggests instead of trying to relax today by pushing chores to tomorrow, just do the chores now and relax all night and all day tomorrow. Genius. Good lesson for tax season...

Mar 9, 18 9:41 am
randomised



Just picked up this beauty from the library. It's a look book with some simple assignments and very cute drawings.

Mar 9, 18 12:09 pm
shellarchitect

6 year old now reads to me at night, best part of the day

Mar 9, 18 12:43 pm
grrd

I don't have kids yet, but I know I will read "The Little Prince (Le Petit Prince)" by Antoine Saint-Exupéry to them. I don't know why it isn't as popular in the US as it is in the rest of the world, but I feel like it's one of those books that all kids should know about.



Mar 9, 18 6:17 pm
wynne1architect@gmail.com

who can afford children based on an small architect's fee basis?

Mar 9, 18 8:07 pm
randomised

Anyone can afford them, in the poorest countries they have the most kids, go figure...

shellarchitect

Kids are cheap, they only want the very basics

shellarchitect

Daycare on the other hand....,.

MomReadsDaily

The books for last week were...

Apr 16, 18 10:54 am
MomReadsDaily

One of last weeks books were, Don't Bring Your Dragon To The Library: We loved the book and the pictures were great too.

My son will be 7 in Oct. of this year he loves to play and watch others on youtube play video games like most other little kids. I did some thinking that not a lot of kids are getting exposed to just simple reading any more, so I started recording myself and my son reading. My hopes are that others get to see his growth and some kids his age might also be motiveted to read or if nothing else enjoy us reading. 

Apr 16, 18 11:24 am
TomCrawford

I don't have my own children yet, but I remember what I liked the most when I was in my childhood. At the very young age, I liked the most books which contained a lot of different pictures - no matter what was the book about. That could be even Alice in the Wonderland. Then I started to enjoy Alice in the Wonderland because of the story itself. Then I became familiar with such books as Harry Potter (all parts), Eragon, Crhistmas Carol and so on. Also, I know that children like reading different comics. And elder children like Stephen King's books.

Apr 17, 18 10:21 am
yaramowafy

Enjoy this fiction for children based in Ancient Egypt. Very intriguing with strong characters and visuals! http://littletut.com 

Jun 26, 18 8:11 pm
randywallace

My daughters love the illustrations in Mo Willem's books (any of the Pigeon stories are great!), and we enjoy The Spider and the Fly by Tony DiTerlizzi - the artwork in this book is fantastic.


Jul 5, 18 2:03 pm

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