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Architectural Style Help

HouseQuestionForYou

can someone help me identify what kind of style this house is? I've been looking and I can't seem to find anything that resembles it.

 
Nov 26, 23 1:13 am
citizen

No discernible (by me) style, just the end result of construction over a period of time.  Lots (and lots!) of buildings can be characterized this way.  It's not a slam, just an interpretation.

Nov 26, 23 1:23 am  · 
3  · 

There’s a little bit of 70s shed going on with the clerestory and mono roofs, but it’s completely obscured by that 2nd floor. Agreed that it’s just contractor/building designer making something up to sell

Nov 26, 23 1:16 pm  · 
3  · 
HouseQuestionForYou

If it helps, it was built in 1990.

Nov 26, 23 2:29 am  · 
 · 
∑ π ∓ √ ∞

Why is style important to you?

Nov 26, 23 1:41 pm  · 
 · 
HouseQuestionForYou

I was just curious if it had a style that's all

Nov 26, 23 6:06 pm  · 
 · 

stucco modern

Nov 27, 23 1:25 pm  · 
 · 
proto

OP, my first reaction was this thread is a troll (I find it hard to consider anyone thinks this has a style, def not architects).

This house clearly doesn't have a style - it was built by someone who didn't even consider style. The roof dormer was stacked on the outside wall because it was easier structurally, and it maximized floor space. There are tiny and few windows, again indicating more interested in cheap before style. The trim at openings is flat casing without sills (cheap). Windows don't match. Minimal eaves. Plywood T-111 type siding (again cheap) & (if i'm not mistaken) the thinnest comp roofing available with a discontinuous gutter. Not to mention this is the front facade (by the house numbers on the trim?) despite looking like a back elevation of a cheap house.

Nov 29, 23 11:43 am  · 
2  · 
Non Sequitur

very few houses built in the last 40 years have a style. This one is no exception, it’s just typical cheap suburban sprawl. 

Nov 26, 23 6:48 am  · 
3  · 
gwharton

Probably this...


Nov 26, 23 8:14 am  · 
5  ·  1
HouseQuestionForYou

Unnecessary

Nov 26, 23 12:27 pm  · 
 ·  1
citizen

Here at Archinect, we specialize in unnecessary... with varying degrees of politesse. Buckle up.

Nov 26, 23 3:14 pm  · 
6  ·  1
ill_will

Why are you adding extra letters to the word *necessary* ?

Nov 29, 23 11:56 am  · 
1  · 
gwharton

Or maybe this...


Nov 26, 23 8:15 am  · 
6  · 
mission_critical

Ah King County. That’ll be $2.5M please. You mentioned you build spec homes. Mind sharing some images? Im finding it difficult not to over spend for my location.

Nov 26, 23 11:37 pm  · 
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gwharton

That one's in Mason County, if you can believe it. I'll post a couple of work-in-progress home designs we have in the pipeline right now in a separate thread.

Nov 27, 23 6:43 pm  · 
 · 
bennyc

home depot post modern

Nov 26, 23 8:20 am  · 
1  · 
JLC-1

that clerestory and the 12:12 pitch gives me nausea. I'd say it's "Fast Cabin with cheap additions" style based on past experiences. 

Nov 26, 23 5:15 pm  · 
1  · 

I can’t believe it was built in 1990. Those clear story windows scream 1970s.


Nov 29, 23 7:55 am  · 
4  · 
Non Sequitur

but those home owners/slimy realtors deserved it.

Nov 29, 23 8:04 am  · 
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Voice-to-text apparently doesn't recognize "clerestory" oops.

Nov 29, 23 8:45 am  · 
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Also, to HouseQuestion OP: Search for any thread here, going back decades, when someone asks for help identifying a style and you will see that we mercilessly roast every single one of them. It's not personal, it's just fun for us. Unless it's truly a historically significant example, style isn't important, at all. It's a term real estate agents use to sound knowledgeable. 

Nov 29, 23 8:48 am  · 
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proto

but if we're honest, most accompanying photos to these types of posts are not houses that were following a style in the first place

Nov 29, 23 11:51 am  · 
3  · 
gwharton

proto - That's kind of the point of why the roasting happens. The reality is that 90%+ of homes built in the USA have never had an architect associated with their design at any point, and most of the design decision-making has not been organized around any kind of coherent principles. They are all a pastiche of various things thrown together ad hoc by people who are not prioritizing design quality. Hence "Contractor Traditional" and "Contractor Modern."

Nov 29, 23 12:21 pm  · 
2  · 
proto

Totally agree

Nov 29, 23 12:34 pm  · 
1  · 
Volunteer

This must be "Beat the Contractors Day". Ever wonder what contractors think of architects? 

Nov 29, 23 12:26 pm  · 
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proto

no, they make it pretty clear

Nov 29, 23 12:35 pm  · 
2  · 
gwharton

I work closely with a bunch of them. I'm intimately familiar with what they think about architects. And they're usually more than justified in those opinions.

Nov 29, 23 12:35 pm  · 
2  · 
Volunteer

I recall a famous architect's design that was built in New England in the 1970s. It was on the cover of a popular magazine at the time. It fell apart ​after only a few years. A do-gooder group of architects enlisted a contractor for advice on saving this modern icon. He told them he could build it back exactly as it was according to plans but it would just as quickly fall apart again. He did not want the grief or the stain on his reputation. Then we could visit "Brad Pitt and the Famous Architects Folly" in New Orleans but maybe that's to painful. \

Nov 29, 23 12:38 pm  · 
2  · 
Wood Guy

An architect friend of mine calls his style "carpenter modern." I use the term for this recent project of mine. 

Nov 30, 23 9:58 am  · 
1  · 
Wood Guy

I meant to add that I see some resemblance with the OP's house.

Nov 30, 23 10:10 am  · 
1  · 

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