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New grad living in NY vs LA

131
ArchKid

Recently graduated with M.Arch. Have about 5 years of professional experience at architectural firms. I want to choose between New York city vs Los Angeles to live and work at. Single person.

Let me hear some of your thoughts about the 2 cities?  

 
Oct 30, 20 12:00 am
natematt

LA is cheaper and will be warmer for the next 5 months...

Oct 30, 20 2:33 am  · 
 · 
Jay1122

LA over NY any day. Shouldn't you let the job offer lead you if you have such flexibility? These major cities are very competitive both market wise and culturally. I would even go for 2nd tier city if the firm/job is better. Just my 2 cents. Also consider if you have relatives on east or west side. It will help when you need them or even just get together during holidays.

Oct 30, 20 9:28 am  · 
 · 

I've lived in both cities and love them both. Ultimately it will come down to what kind of lifestyle you want.

LA is only slightly cheaper than NYC these days, but in LA you'll have the added expense of owning a car, which will more than eat up any cost of living savings. Be sure to create a realistic budget for each city; you might be surprised which one comes out ahead.

LA has nicer beaches and better tacos, though, so it might be worth it.

Oct 30, 20 1:41 pm  · 
1  · 
ArchKid

Is living in LA without a car a bad idea? If realistically you work close to home?

Oct 30, 20 7:12 pm  · 
 · 

I guess it depends on where you are, what's within easy walking / biking or transit distance, and what you want to do for fun. It's great if you can commute to/from work without a car, but also keep in mind things like the grocery store, hardware store, the doctor's office, places to eat and drink, etc. And a big part of LA's appeal is being able to get up into the mountains or out to the beach pretty easily. You'll usually need a car for that stuff.

Oct 30, 20 8:29 pm  · 
 · 
atelier nobody

Our public transit is pathetic. There are a few places where you could live, work, and shop within a smaller area, but plan on an hour+ of multiple trains and busses (or an expensive Uber) if you want to see any of the city outside your little pocket of walkable urbanity.

Oct 30, 20 8:46 pm  · 
 · 
ArchKid

Yeah thats one of the biggest turn off about LA. Unless I'm making 6 figures, I don't think I can live that comfortable lifestyle. Most firms in NY are located in Manhattan, and living there is another whole story. There are def a lot of pros and cons in both cities.

Oct 30, 20 8:57 pm  · 
 · 
ArchKid

.

Oct 30, 20 8:57 pm  · 
 · 
archi_dude

"Work close to home in LA", HAHAHAHAHAHA!

Oct 31, 20 10:16 am  · 
1  · 
Non Sequitur

curious to see what the change in compensation is between a fresh (online) M.arch grad in toronto to one in NY or LA.

Oct 31, 20 11:14 am  · 
 · 
RobG

I lived without a car for almost 6 years in LA. It definitely depends on where you live/work/entertain yourself. Most people in LA are loathe to cross town unless we absolutely have to, as it is.The East side is near downtown and all the metro lines converge downtown so if you choose DTLA or the East Side you have access to a lot, but again that depends on where exactly you end up. The West side is its own thing anyway. I don't think most people on the West side come downtown or to the Eastside unless they have to.I think that would be more of a challenge to live car free but there is a lot of dining and entertainment on the West side too, so it just depends on how much of a fit you are for your neighborhood.

Sep 24, 22 1:07 pm  · 
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x-jla

stay single whichever city you choose. 



Oct 30, 20 2:26 pm  · 
 · 
ArchKid

noted

Oct 30, 20 7:12 pm  · 
 · 
atelier nobody

Counterpoint - 2 incomes really help in higher cost-of-living cities, but DON'T have kids.

Oct 30, 20 8:49 pm  · 
2  · 
przemula

It's even cheaper to kill yourself. And if city won't be able to identify your body, they'll have to bury you for free

Sep 29, 22 1:23 pm  · 
1  · 
Non Sequitur

wait 5 days and see if it's still a place you want to move to.

Oct 30, 20 2:29 pm  · 
1  · 
archi_dude

*which one is still standing

Oct 31, 20 10:17 am  · 
 · 
atelier nobody

I honestly wouldn't recommend either. I've lived most of my life in the LA area, but unless one is already connected with family, social circles, etc. it can be a harsh experience. If I were starting out fresh, I'd aim for "2nd tier" cities - Seattle, Portland, Minneapolis, etc. Cost of living is lower, stress is lower, and you'll generally find just as much "culture" as you would in LA, San Francisco, Chicago (probably somewhat less than NYC, though). My one sojourn outside LA was in Minneapolis for about 5 years, and I loved it (winters can be a bit much for some people though). I've also spent significant time visiting Seattle, and would move there in a heartbeat if I had a good job offer (or, better yet, Vancouver, BC).

Oct 30, 20 3:16 pm  · 
 · 
flatroof

Chicago is cheaper to live in than Seattle and Portland these days. Minneapolis seems to have the same rent prices as Chicago now. Philly is good if you want to live on the East Coast and still be 90 min to NYC.

Oct 30, 20 3:21 pm  · 
1  · 
whistler

Not Vancouver ..... don't go I hear it sucks!

Oct 30, 20 4:46 pm  · 
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atelier nobody

I'm totally ready to Californicate Vancouver at the first opportunity.

Oct 30, 20 6:36 pm  · 
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whistler

Wednesday???

Oct 30, 20 6:42 pm  · 
 · 
ArchKid

Vancouver is the closest thing to LA vibe Canada has

Oct 30, 20 7:13 pm  · 
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Non Sequitur

LA =\= Vancouver. Not even close.

Oct 30, 20 8:02 pm  · 
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whistler

Don't tell all those folks in Kitsilano, they think they're living in Venice Beach!

Oct 30, 20 8:11 pm  · 
 · 
ArchKid

haha I actually visited vancouver couple months ago. I can tell why they think its venice.

Oct 30, 20 8:18 pm  · 
 · 
atelier nobody

"Vancouver is the closest thing to LA vibe Canada has"

Gawd, I hope not - Vancouverites have my deepest sympathy if that's true.

Oct 30, 20 8:51 pm  · 
1  · 
ArchKid

nothing wrong with that. Vancouver has the warmest (mildest) average weather in all of Canada. Even that, compared to LA, its still pretty cold. It doesn't have the nightlife of LA either. But just in terms of mountains, beach, views. Thats how Im comparing it to LA

Oct 30, 20 8:55 pm  · 
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sp429

I agree w David. Depends on what lifestyle you're looking for. I'm in NYC and I moved here from the SF Bay Area. When I get older I may consider moving back, probably to the East Bay. I'm a single woman in early 30s... still prefer NYC. 

Oct 30, 20 3:20 pm  · 
 · 
The_Crow

Currently with the pandemic you're still paying the cost to live in NY without all of the world class things to do that make it worth it. Now that the cold weather is here, there really isn't anything to do...

Oct 30, 20 4:15 pm  · 
 · 
sp429

I still do the things I enjoyed doing. I love the diversity here. There is something unique about this city which I have not felt anywhere else. I have a simple lifestyle. I work hard and enjoy training thai boxing. My gym is now open, w all the safety precautions in place. Staying safe, working hard, training hard :)  

Oct 30, 20 10:13 pm  · 
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Koww

which state elected a body builder as governor?

Oct 30, 20 10:39 pm  · 
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archinine
Yep nyc is terrible. Definitely go somewhere else. Nothing to see here
Nov 1, 20 5:13 pm  · 
2  · 
randomised

it’s funny always those discussions about LA vs NY, there’s literally an entire country in between that’s being ignored, kind of explains the state your country is in...that said, NY no doubt.

Nov 2, 20 2:04 am  · 
2  · 
x-jla

And the area in between is far more livable and less annoying

Sep 23, 22 10:42 am  · 
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justavisual

LA no doubt, but dont pretend you can do it without a car.

Nov 2, 20 5:20 am  · 
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jennifersm

NYC is incredibly expensive. It’s loud. Noise is everywhere. The traffic, beeping horns, the subway trains, sirens, loud people. It takes a while to adapt. Speaking of safety, NYC is the safest large city in the US and one of the safest large cities in the world. It's a walking city. We don't own cars, and if we can't walk we use the trains. $2.75 and you can go anywhere, even to the beach.

Sep 23, 22 6:45 am  · 
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x-jla

I don’t think it’s the safest anymore. Crime is way up in both nyc and LA Thant

Sep 23, 22 10:43 am  · 
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x-jla

*thanks to the current “leadership”

Sep 23, 22 10:43 am  · 
 · 

That's not true x-jla.

Sep 23, 22 10:46 am  · 
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x-jla

Crime in nyc is reported to be up 30-40% this year from last year.

Sep 23, 22 11:32 am  · 
 · 

Source? Also a source for your claim about LA?

This source says you're full of it regarding NYC

https://www1.nyc.gov/site/nypd/stats/crime-statistics/historical.page

Sep 23, 22 1:04 pm  · 
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x-jla

This is common knowledge for people who live there and see it happening in real time. LA is completely falling off the rails.

Sep 23, 22 1:12 pm  · 
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Non Sequitur

I saw a black bear on the side of the road yesterday but did not see one last week in that spot. Does that mean bear sightings increased 100% in only 7 days? Time to panic... why would anyone think of the children?

Sep 23, 22 1:15 pm  · 
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x-jla

Rule # 300: when liberal policies fail miserably pretend that it’s not happening.

Sep 23, 22 1:20 pm  · 
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x-jla

Meanwhile in Brazil…

Sep 23, 22 2:12 pm  · 
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square.

do you live in either of those places? how can you speak to "common knowledge?"

while crime is up in nyc, it's no where near to the level you are describing. noticeable, yes. the apocalypse, no. i would certainly still describe it overall as a safe city.

Sep 23, 22 2:16 pm  · 
 · 
JLC-1

had to "ignore user" again when someone claims stuff out of their a**es.

Sep 23, 22 2:46 pm  · 
 ·  1
x-jla

Puts fingers in ears and yells!

Sep 23, 22 8:08 pm  · 
 · 
x-jla

I find it hilarious that as soon as someone posts something you don’t want to hear you ignore…the stats support what I’m saying…I know it’s painful to see policies that you may have supported implode, but maybe no ignoring other perspectives will help create policies that don’t implode in the future!

Sep 23, 22 8:12 pm  · 
 · 
x-jla

Also, much of this crime stuff runs counter to my own libertarian leaning. For example, I would in theory support abolishing bail, but it doesn’t seem to work in practice. That’s a problem, because it give valid argument to the authoritarians…but true is true no matter who says it.

Sep 23, 22 8:26 pm  · 
 · 
sameolddoctor

Crime in LA has been going up year after year, especially since 2020. Not sure if it is due to "liberal politics", or due to the sheer number of people that keep moving here and displacing others.

Sep 23, 22 9:00 pm  · 
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x-jla

The population of LA has not increased over the last few years. People are moving out. Criminals don’t materialize because they are displaced in 2 years. The root of the problem is that these people making the policies don’t understand the human condition

Sep 24, 22 10:25 am  · 
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x-jla

Criminals take advantage of what they perceive as weakness and opportunity

Sep 24, 22 10:26 am  · 
 · 
x-jla

Some liberal upper middle class lady looking for likes in their social circle of like

Sep 24, 22 10:27 am  · 
 · 
x-jla

-minded peers may think that they are expressing “compassion” by supporting these bail reform laws. The criminals see it as a green light to do what they do. This is reality. In theory cash bail is unjust, but in reality most people engaged in criminal acts are snakes, not all but most arrested are guilty, and removing bail is no different than releasing snakes after catching snakes. It’s a policy that will increase crime and misery for the majority of the city inhabitants who are normal folks. As a libertarian I can acknowledge that there is a shortcoming based on the feedback from these experiments. Why can’t leftists accept real world feedback? Maybe because it’s a religion?

Sep 24, 22 10:34 am  · 
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x-jla

I have criminals in my own extended family. They get out of one jail stint and do the same thing a week later. There is a element of every population that is antisocial and degenerate. The deserve Justice and due process, but don’t be naive and think that they will not prey on kindness and leniency. It’s an inconvenient truth.

Sep 24, 22 10:43 am  · 
 · 
Bench

I still have this person on ignore, so i can't read the direct statements. But can confirm that while crime is (apparently) up statistically in NYC, most people's lives - including my own - continue as normal. The fear mongering is pretty overdone, largely by outsiders who do not live here but need a convenient cudgel.

Sep 26, 22 10:44 am  · 
2  · 

x-jla - I wasn't ignoring you. I was out elk hunting. I have a life outside of this site. You should try it.  

 Your original statement: 

 x-jla wrote: 

"Crime in nyc is reported to be up 30-40% this year from last year. "


This statement is false.

We've both listed the same source. 

 You've taken that murders have risen 32% from the last month to mean that all crime is up 30 - 40% from last year. 

 If you look at the actual numbers crims has risen 12.5% in the past year.  

Sep 26, 22 10:47 am  · 
 · 
x-jla

I wasn’t saying that you ignored me. I was referring to JLC-1. “Overall index crime in New York City increased in July 2022, by 30.5% compared with July 2021”. I’m not sure where you are seeing 12.5%.

Sep 26, 22 10:58 am  · 
 · 
x-jla

This is a month to month comparison, so it may differ over the entire year. Typically July has higher crime in NYC. Probably because more people are out partying for the summer.

Sep 26, 22 11:00 am  · 
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x-jla

LA is even worse according to the times article. Homicides up 50% since 2019, and Armed robbery is up 60%. Car theft is up 44%. These are huge increases, not minor upticks.

Sep 26, 22 11:03 am  · 
 · 
x-jla

CNN even saying it’s up 40%.
…imo it’s being underestimated from what I’ve heard from friends and family who live there.

Sep 26, 22 11:19 am  · 
 · 
square.

to answer the original question before you derailed the thread with your ideology.. what is the safest big city in the us according to your "research"?

Sep 26, 22 11:32 am  · 
 · 

x-jla - I'm looking at all the various crime rates from this year to last year and doing the math. I'm not sure where you're getting your numbers.

I don't care what CNN or the NYT is saying.  The data from the NYC police department is saying something different.  Some crimes have gone up 32%.  If you take certain crimes and average them together you can get a 40% increase.  That's being dishonest though.  

That's not what you said though.  You said that crime has gone up 30-40% in NCY from last year.  That is not true.  Taking all of the crime data it's gone up 12.5% overall.  This is still a large increase though.  It's not 30 - 40% though. 

Sep 26, 22 12:24 pm  · 
 · 
x-jla

Lol. “Ideology” is what is causing the problems, and also blocking certain people from viewing the feedback objectively. Denying the reality of what is happening in cities around the country is not going to fix it. It’s the biggest concern for many citizens-especially minority and lower income communities.

Sep 26, 22 12:29 pm  · 
 · 
x-jla

The left is correct about some things, but this is not one of them.

Sep 26, 22 12:30 pm  · 
 · 
x-jla

Chad, some outlets are saying 30% ish, others reported 40-50% ish. Im not sure where you are seeing 12.5%. Maybe if you include petty crime, but these figures are for major crimes (felonies) rape, robbery, murder, assault, grand larceny, etc.
https://nypost.com/2022/08/08/major-crime-continues-to-surge-in-nyc-up-36-this-year-new-police-data/amp/

Sep 26, 22 1:22 pm  · 
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x-jla

30-40% is a lot, but it’s still no where near the levels of the 80’s and early 90’s.

Sep 26, 22 1:31 pm  · 
 · 
x-jla

But, something happened around the 2000’s-2010’s that worked. I’m interested In knowing what that was. Despite the recession of 08’ crime was very low.

Sep 26, 22 1:33 pm  · 
 · 

x-jla - you didn't say major crimes. You said crime. The 12.5% I quoted included everything except petty crimes. The only way you're getting in the 30 - 40% range is by only counting murder, felony assault, and felony car theft. Those three categories make up 27% of all crime in NYC. Again, this would be misleading to the point of lying if you say this represents all crime.

Sep 26, 22 1:41 pm  · 
 · 
x-jla

Its misleading by including crime that no one cares about like jaywalking and speeding to tamper down the number. The type of crimes that people are mainly concerned with in terms of their safety are major crimes.

Sep 26, 22 3:29 pm  · 
 · 
x-jla

I’m pretty sure a woman walking around is worries about rape…not if someone is double parked.

Sep 26, 22 3:31 pm  · 
 · 

Petty crimes were not included in the number. Only major crimes where another party where impacted. These are:

 Murder and non neglatent manslaughter   +5.6%

Rape 1%

robbery +1%

felony assault +1%

Burglary -20%

Grand Larceny 11.6%

Grand Larceny of a Motor Vehicle +11%


Sep 26, 22 4:05 pm  · 
 · 

Cases of rape went up 4.4%, not 1.0% Sorry for the error.

Sep 26, 22 4:14 pm  · 
 · 

Taking actual number of cases of the above offenses crime went up 7.4% total. If you take into account arrests for drugs then the number climbs to around 12.5 %

Sep 26, 22 4:17 pm  · 
 · 
x-jla

You are misreading it.

Sep 26, 22 4:32 pm  · 
 · 
x-jla

“The New York Police Department tracked increases across every major crime category. The city recorded a 41% increase in overall major crime through the first months of 2022 compared to the same period last year, including a nearly 54% increase in robberies, a 56% increase in grand larceny incidents and a 22% increase in rape reports, the data shows.”. This is per the cnn article. Others conclude similar trends. Some look at specific month to month comparison, while others compare the entire year which is why there is some difference, but the overall average for major crime is above 30%

Sep 26, 22 4:35 pm  · 
 · 

Source? Because that's not what the data from the NYC link says.

Sep 26, 22 5:35 pm  · 
 · 

x-jla wrote: "You are misreading it"

From the NYC report we both linked.  Major crimes . . . 


Sep 26, 22 5:36 pm  · 
 · 

Graduated in NYC, Interned and started post-grad here, so I really have no idea what it would be like if I wasn't here. My opinion of NYC is:

- Not needing a car is super nice. I cannot imagine owning a car (paying insurance, maintanence) to be able to live fully. It is just such a hassle in my mind. But I get the freedom of owning it however. 

- I can cycle anywhere, as long as I am going less than 13mi away, bicycle would be comparable or considerably faster commute. 

- Just pleasant to walk to favourite restaurant, cycle to a nice park, subway to a musical. 

- If you don't have rich parents, and want to actually save some of your earnings, I guess you just have to have roommates until marraige or live in dangerous neighbourhoods. But I do not get the fuss of 5 storey walk-ups, etc etc... unless you are like 50. Laundromat experience sucks, but you get used to it. 

- the density of the city does wear me out sometimes though. I noticed this especially when I visited Seattle. Just needed a reminder that cities do not have to be so loud and crowded. As a person who hates night life, NYC sucks sometimes.

-homelessness, lack of street etiquettes are also very noticeable. 

Sep 26, 22 12:31 pm  · 
 · 
homme_du_jura

I keep encountering this fixation on these two cities so much on these forums and I'm asking myself why. I've visited New York and L.A. multiple times and experienced their various neighborhoods each time and the appeal diminishes pretty quickly. Neither of these cities possess the kind of cultural and commercial advantages they once had a few decades ago.  You can enjoy a lot of the same amenities and retain more of your income for a more comfortable lifestyle in the so-called "second" and "third tier" cities mentioned above. This has become more evident during the last few years as NY&LA are beset by rising crime and endemic corruption, with neither likely to be adequately addressed for a long time to come.

Sep 26, 22 1:27 pm  · 
1  · 
square.

Neither of these cities possess the kind of cultural and commercial advantages they once had a few decades ago.

this is a wildly exaggerated statement that needs a lot of clarification. say what you will about living in nyc (yes it's hard, yes it's expensive as hell, and certainly not for everyone), but it's one of the capital cities of the world, and for a reason. just because you don't "find the various neighborhoods appealing" (whatever that means) doesn't make your claim accurate.

Sep 26, 22 5:44 pm  · 
 · 
homme_du_jura

I question this idea that since NYC is one of the "capital" cities of the world then it's really worth living there. With the onset of globalism, power has been dispersing from the large global cosmopolitan centers to smaller more regional capitals. LA and NYC have lost much of their commercial and cultural clout during the past few decades.  The industries that shaped these cities' identities have rapidly been leaving for other more favorable environments (e.g. financial companies relocating to Charlotte, Miami and Dallas; Hollywood migrating to Georgia one blockbuster at a time; Tech establishing new hubs in Salt Lake City, Austin and Raleigh).  What these older pedestrian-oriented cities offered was convenient physical proximity to job centers, but since the pandemic the large out-migration of residents to less dense suburbs and smaller cities revealed that many people would rather live elsewhere if given the chance. When work from home finally became viable, and all of a sudden the demand for more offices, a key component of downtowns, is going to inevitably shrink. The spike in crime in these "capital"' cities doesn't help things either.  When I wrote that cities such as NY and LA seemed to lose their appeal, I meant that from various scales and locations, both in their commercial cores as well as in their neighborhoods, there seemed to be evidence of neglect and dysfunctional municipal services.  Brooklyn and Queens might have their charm, but they are saddled with decaying built fabric and crumbling infrastructure that makes these places far from world class. Manhattan still retains an incredible built legacy that makes it stand out among all cities on the globe, but it increasingly becomes a city best enjoyed for visiting rather than for living.

Sep 28, 22 11:58 am  · 
 · 
square.

LA and NYC have lost much of their commercial and cultural clout during the past few decades

where is your evidence on this? tech has a huge presence that is growing in nyc, alongside traditional financial markets which are so obvious i can't believe i need to say it. sure things are shifting but some of the most important cultural institutions are still here (broadway, museums, etc etc etc etc..)

Manhattan still retains an incredible built legacy that makes it stand out among all cities on the globe

my point is proven, thanks.

Sep 28, 22 4:23 pm  · 
 · 
x-jla

I was born and lived on NY until I was in my mid 20’s.  Walked home through the worst neighborhoods at 2am when crime was way higher than now. I would not feel safe in a crowded city with my kids now.  Last time I visited it was nerve racking to be in the subways with an infant.  Not only the crime, but the potential for terrorism, pandemics, natural disasters… I was there during 9-11.  I could see the smoke stack from my house.  After that, my opinion of dense urban environments as a place that I wanted to live changed.  It’s a great place to grow up.  It’s a great place to live when you are single.  The dynamic changes when you have a family to worry about.   I know that statistically it’s safe, but there is a claustrophobic nature to nyc that becomes overwhelming for some folks.  I remember as a kid feeling overwhelmed by the noise and lights. And I was born there.  It’s not for everyone.  

Sep 28, 22 12:10 pm  · 
 ·  2
square.

i'm sorry you live in so much fear- nyc is still a wonderful place to visit and live. i can hear the kids in the playground right now. it's a beautiful day.

Sep 28, 22 12:28 pm  · 
 · 

Wasn't x-jla posting that NYC isn't safe farther up thread?  Something about crime being up 40%? Now he says he knows it's safe.  

I'm not a fan of living in large metro areas.  I don't have to misrepresent their level of safety to justify my personal preferences.  I've been to many, many, huge metro areas in the US and Europe.  I was uneasy because I don't like huge crowds.  I never felt unsafe through.

Sep 28, 22 12:32 pm  · 
1  · 
square.

chad imagine people having different preference for how they live, without needing to project those preference onto others?

Sep 28, 22 2:52 pm  · 
 · 

I know, how weird would that be!?

Sep 28, 22 3:19 pm  · 
 · 
x-jla

Chad, you have a very black and white thinking style. Crime is up 30-40%. That’s a fact. That doesn’t automatically make the city “dangerous” in comparison to higher crime cities like Detroit or St Louis. It’s becoming more dangerous for sure. That’s a factual trend based on data. Yes, as a parent I fear for the safety of my offspring. I’m pretty confident in my ability to knock out a crazy subway dweller…I can do much about a more virulent pandemic break out and a govt lockdown if I’m in a crowded city like nyc. I like being closer to the outdoors. That’s my preference, as I clearly stated in the personalized post. I’m not projecting that preference, you are projecting your preference for urbanized areas. As for the crime, that’s not a feeling, it’s a fact based on data as I clearly pointed out.

Sep 28, 22 3:33 pm  · 
 · 
x-jla

Especially after the draconian and frivolous lockdowns and mandates in nyc, the failures after failures, lies, hypocrisy, the corruption, the riots…it’s clear to me that densely populated urban areas, especially those run by a certain party, are places where the shit can hit the fan pretty quickly. It’s something to consider strongly of you are considering opening a business that can be shutdown or destroyed, having a family, etc.

Sep 28, 22 3:37 pm  · 
 · 

The 30-40% number you keep stating isn't correct. Look at the NYC crime data you linked. It's the same data that I'm using. 

You said that crime has gone up 30-40% from last year.  The data you're providing says that crime has gone up 13 - 32% from July 2022 to August 2022 depending on the type of major crime. 

Overall major crimes have gone up 9% from this time last year.  

Sep 28, 22 3:37 pm  · 
 · 
x-jla

But here is my exact quote from “above”, Chad. “ 30-40% is a lot, but it’s still no where near the levels of the 80’s and early 90’s.”

Sep 28, 22 3:39 pm  · 
 · 
x-jla

I think the intelligentsia judge everything by the state of their enclaves, where dogs wear sweaters, and artisanal mayonnaise is sold for 40$ a jar.

Sep 28, 22 3:41 pm  · 
 · 

See my reply above. You're using a rise in major crime from July to August 2022. Your data is NOT for the major crime rates from this time last year. That's the point that you don't seem to understand.

Sep 28, 22 3:43 pm  · 
 ·  1
x-jla

You are wrong.

Sep 28, 22 3:48 pm  · 
 · 
x-jla

No one is reporting anything lower than 30%. Even dnc state media-aka
cnn.

Sep 28, 22 3:51 pm  · 
 · 
x-jla

“Overall index crime in New York City increased in July 2022, by 30.5% compared with July 2021 (11,619 v. 8,906). Six of the seven major index-crime categories saw increases, driven by a 40.6% increase in grand larceny (4,588 v. 3,262), a 37.2% increase in robbery (1,730 v. 1,261), and a 25.6% rise in burglary (1,325 v. 1,055).”. This is from the ny.gov site. It’s comparing July 2021-July 2022, but that’s not the big increase. The trend starts in 2019. If we compare the increase over the last 5 years
it’s way higher than 30%.

Sep 28, 22 3:54 pm  · 
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Look at the NYC crime data page that you linked.  It says something different.  

I'm not looking at anything but the NYC reported data.  

Sep 28, 22 3:55 pm  · 
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x-jla

like I said, there were about 500 murders in 2020. In 1990 it was like 2200. There is a rising trend, but it’s still not like it was in 1990. I lived there in 1990. Travel Warnings were issued to tourists. It was “dangerous” for an American city. Not Caracas dangerous, but relatively dangerous.

Sep 28, 22 3:59 pm  · 
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Look at the NYC crime data from this time last year. I don't care about what happened in the 90's.

Sep 28, 22 4:09 pm  · 
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square.

xlax, your insecruties are showing. op showed up originally asking about living in la and nyc, and you've gone on a tirade about why YOU don't like nyc and think it's dangerous as someone who hasn't lived there for decades. meanwhile those of us who actually live here have genuine, credible advice to give (all of which has acknowledge that yes indeed there is crime, but it's largely worth it if it's something you want to do). surely if you were in their shoes and an actual sane person, you would listen to the first-person accounts and not those of some loony who left the city literal decades ago and clearly has an agenda and unaddressed neurosis.

for the record, i like spending time in rural areas/outdoors, and completely understand why people choose to live there.

again, i ask you to respond to the original question without bringing up your pet anxieties like "artisanal mayonnaise", which is really just a stand-in for your grievances against coastal liberals: what is the safest big city in the us?

Sep 28, 22 4:16 pm  · 
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x-jla

You sound butt hurt that people are noticing rising crime and the failures of liberal policies. How dare they! People are leaving nyc and la for good reasons. It’s overpriced and social decline is obviously expanding. Portland, Seattle, Chicago, SF, are all experiencing decline. Can you guess the common denominator?

Sep 28, 22 6:01 pm  · 
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x-jla

And like I said, “dangerous” for 1200.00 a month is acceptable. “Mildly dangerous” for 5000.00 a month is not. For the prices of NYC, I can have a nice place somewhere without people shitting on the sidewalk.

Sep 28, 22 6:03 pm  · 
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Of the top 20 cities in the US with the most crime per capita, 13/20 cities are in  republican run states. Notice a common denominator?

https://worldpopulationreview....

Sep 28, 22 6:33 pm  · 
2  · 

x-jla wrote: 

"And like I said, “dangerous” for 1200.00 a month is acceptable. “Mildly dangerous” for 5000.00 a month is not. For the prices of NYC, I can have a nice place somewhere without people shitting on the sidewalk."

Farther up you where saying that NYC was safe.  Now you're back to saying it's not not safe?  You also said you were worried about terrorism and pandemics but later on lamented the responses to these situations as if NTY was over reaching. 

You're contradicting yourself a lot here x-jla.

Sep 28, 22 6:36 pm  · 
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homme_du_jura

Well said, x-jla. I understand the romantic aspirations of those who want to move to such vaunted cultural capitals like NYC. I did the same earlier in my career when I worked in Chicago, where I enjoyed the perfect aesthetic lifestyle living in a cute brownstone, taking the El train, walking by landmark buildings on a daily basis by Louis Sullivan, Mies, and SOM while enjoying views of Lake Michigan from the office window. But after a year living there it was clear that it wasn't well suited to my goals of raising a family in comfort and safety, and that was during the "good" days when the mayor was competent and crime was at historic lows. What annoys me is that we have so many threads started by people who committed themselves to live the rough and tumble urban life in an overpriced cultural capital complain about their lives becoming difficult because they don't make enough to enjoy a lifestyle that is really only accessible to the richest.

Sep 28, 22 7:06 pm  · 
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x-jla

Chad, this is too hard for you. The nuance is too much. Stop trying to say what I wrote. We can all look and see. One can be concerned with potential future Pandemics that are more virulent, and the over reaching responses we saw to covid. I know it’s hard for you, but one can say that crime rates are rising, and it’s of concern, and simultaneously say that the city is fairly safe relative to other cities and it’s own past rates. We are allowed to do this. It’s called nuance. Nuance is not the same a contradiction.

Sep 28, 22 7:16 pm  · 
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square.

Of the top 20 cities in the US with the most crime per capita, 13/20 cities are in republican run states. Notice a common denominator?

this should have ended the conversation.. xlax still can't answer the original question of what big city is safer.

What annoys me is that we have so many threads started by people who committed themselves to live the rough and tumble urban life in an overpriced cultural capital complain about their lives becoming difficult because they don't make enough to enjoy a lifestyle that is really only accessible to the richest.

also, what's with the obsession of other people choosing to live in the coastal cities? if you don't want to, great! but op does. you're contributing nothing by airing your personal grievances and obsessing with other people's lifestyles. comment on other threads if it annoys you, but it shouldn't come as any surprise that many architects choose to move to two of the largest cities in the country, where there is a ton of concentrated building, hence jobs.

Sep 29, 22 9:24 am  · 
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x-jla

I don’t care where the op chooses to move. He is asking for opinions. I gave one. None of the above is my answer. You are using 1 metric- safety. I am saying that rising crime is one of many factors to consider. Crime is a proxy for many problems that the city is experiencing. It is in a state if decline. You can choose to move to a very expensive and crowded city, with draconian tendencies, in a state of decline, or a less expensive less crowded city, that is doing well. It’s the op’s choice.

Sep 29, 22 11:00 am  · 
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x-jla

You would have to be a special kind of serf to open a business in a state that is willing to wanton shut you down for months, putting many hard working peoples dress

Sep 29, 22 11:03 am  · 
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x-jla

* dreams out of business. Same time leaving McDonald’s and all the corporate overlords alone. That’s a city that hates its citizens. That’s a city who’s priorities are clear. What kind of stupid person would invest their time and money into such a place?

Sep 29, 22 11:05 am  · 
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That's not what you said. 

You stated that crime in NYC had gone up 40% and that made the area unsafe.  None of that is correct. 

You then backpedaled and contradicted yourself when conflicting information disproved your original statement. You didn't post a personal opinion on the living in NYC until after all of the above.  

You're now trying to blame the high crime ( or is it the relative safety? ) of NYC on liberal policies and assign malevolent motivation to the government for overreach. 

You need to get professional help x-jla.  You have some serious mental issues regarding your paranoia and delusions of grandeur.   

Sep 29, 22 11:05 am  · 
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x-jla

Crime has gone up 30-40% per the articles and data that I linked. Are they lying? Can you pin point where I contradict myself?

Sep 29, 22 11:18 am  · 
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Look at the actual data in the report. The page you're looking at was for July. If you take the data from Sept 21 to Sept 22 the crime rate has gone down putting major crimes around a 12% rise.  Also look at the contributing factors to the initial rise in crime rates.  Simply look at ALL the data, not just the portions the support your opinions.  

 Also I like how you're ignoring that you've been contradicting yourself throughout your posts: "NYC isn't safe - just look at the rising crime rate, NYC is safe - it was way worse, NYC isn't safe because of the liberal policies."  Make up your mind.

Sep 29, 22 12:10 pm  · 
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x-jla

It’s pretty low to make up fake quotes by me when what I actually wrote is all above.

Sep 29, 22 12:48 pm  · 
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x-jla

Jla-x “The temperature has been increasing over the last few years because of xyz”. Chad-“is it hot, or is it cold, make up mind you contradicting!” A rising crime rate is an indication that it may be it may soon become “dangerous”. No one said that it is currently “dangerous”- which is a subjective designation. It may seem dangerous to someone coming from Tokyo, but safe to someone coming from Caracas. Crime in nyc is not at the levels that it was in1990, but if the trajectory continues, it can exceed 1990 rates. The policies that contributed to this show no signs of changing. If they do, one can reassess. A reasonable person would take this into consideration when planning a long term decision to live there.

Sep 29, 22 12:58 pm  · 
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x-jla

Like I said, crime was a primary concern for people (especially people in less wealthy areas) in the 80’s and 90’s. Why wouldn’t it be? Those concerns are once again becoming a major issue for inhabitants. What is hard to understand?

Sep 29, 22 1:00 pm  · 
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homme_du_jura

Square,

Sep 30, 22 12:03 pm  · 
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homme_du_jura

Square,

The OP simply asked for advice on where they should move to, NYC or LA.  My advice was "neither", and then questioned why young architects were still fixated on this common binary choice when it comes to making such an important move. It might not be the kind of advice that the OP wants to receive, but I've come across way too many fellow professionals who have fled both NYC and LA in recent years for precisely the reasons I described to be ignored on a discussion thread on this topic. It might seem curmudgeonly to mention these problems, but not to mention them would be irresponsible after all that has happened to these cities in recent years.

Sep 30, 22 2:56 pm  · 
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square.

let them learn the lesson for themselves then- you've made your point with a cheeky (but vapid) answer. the fact is they are still interested, and are incredibly unlikely to change their mind based on anonymous trolls. so move on?

Sep 30, 22 3:30 pm  · 
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ArchKid

Well its been 2 years since I made this post. I can confirm I made it to SoCal with a really good salary. I did learn my lesson, I should have moved here earlier. Welcome to my TedTalk.

Oct 4, 22 2:02 am  · 
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