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Help from Residential Architects

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Greg A

Hi All

Hopefully this is the correct place to post this question. I am currently trying to design my renovation for our house (I am not an architect). We are simply adding a large deck at the front, replacing some windows and doors with bifolds etc and landscaping an entrance.

I was hoping for advice on colour schemes, what needs to match etc. I have the structural side of things covered but was really looking for architectural advice on i.e. if trimming are one colour, the fence needs to match this colour etc.

Any advice?

*I have added the 3D render below. Note that this doesn't include a fence etc.

Kind regards

Greg

 
May 29, 17 11:54 pm

2 Featured Comments

All 28 Comments

arch76

Looks like a fun project. Depending on where you are, you may need an architect to put together plans and help you obtain a permit- and help get exterior materials and assemblies coordinated. It is a good start to have a structural engineer on board already. Good luck!

May 30, 17 12:22 am
Greg A

Yes, very fun so far, learning a lot (which is always good). We want to have a reasonable idea about what we are thinking before approaching an architect... no point getting there and spinning our wheels.

RickB-Astoria

That's not how your actions and your message in original post conveys.

b3tadine[sutures]

Greg,

If I may, what line of work are you involved with?

Respectfully,

Architect Trying To Pay Bills

May 30, 17 12:41 am
Greg A

Thank you guys for the quick initial reply. I am actually involved in Finance, Investment Management however my father is a structural engineer. Figured i would try my hand at design as i find this interesting. Regarding DA approval etc I have friends who can manage that process and dad can draw up the plans. I also have builders in the family who can build the project so looking for advice on how to fine tune the colouring etc. 

Because we are trying to keep things fairly minimal on the renovation, there doesn't appear to be too many options for colours etc (i.e. slate blue seems to be popular, charcoal black).

May 30, 17 1:35 am
b3tadine[sutures]

I think the fundamental point being missed here, is this; some of us, many here commenting, have 20 plus years doing this, and you are seeking benefit of that experience, without remuneration. You say principles, and I say experience, my education, and experience, has led me to develop stated principles. If you want free, might I suggest that you work with the contractor, and suppliers of the finishes you require; they are happy to give you all the free you need, and they'll agree with you, every single time.

Greg A

Unfortunately B3tadine, the fundamental point being missed here was that I wouldn't hire an architect for the job... what I have learnt is based on this small sample space of responses, 80.0% of architects are miserable and salty!

RickB-Astoria

You'll really love the salty mouths of construction contractors. Makes us look like angels from heaven. You didn't hire architects in the first place before you met any of us here. It already was given you wouldn't contract an architect in the first place. You and people like you made us miserable and salty to boot.

b3tadine[sutures]

Oh Greg. Salty? Really? I didn't even cuss. Miserable, no, actually, I'm quite happy. I'll even go you one further, I am so fucking happy, that I refuse to give advice away to anyone I am not friends with. I am so fucking deliriously happy, that I value what I do as a licensed professional, so much so, that just in typing a response to you, "a financial" type person, I am seriously thinking I should just send you a fucking bill, $1.00 per character, including spaces.

Salty. I'll give you fucking salty, you Wall Street carpetbagging whore.

But, I'm not salty.

God Bless.

RickB-Astoria

Nah, he's confusing you with the rest of the lot here including this salty asshole (points to self). :-)

RickB-Astoria

I bill by the bit. $1.00 per binary bit. I got a bill invoice for greg anderson.

Please tell me this is stored in Unicode UTF-32. I do count the binary padding zeros, sector interleaves, and all that good stuff.

RickB-Astoria

Chris_Teeter, I hope you got a bill invoice for that nice message. :-)

b3tadine[sutures]

See. I can't even bill correctly!

RickB-Astoria

LOL.... yes.

RickB-Astoria

b3tadine, too bad this person would be one of those that would run from paying the fee. Just two of my posts would amount to over $50K. The f---er owes Chris Teeter at least, $406,864 dollars assuming plain 8-bit ASCII / 8-bit Character set at $1 per binary bit.... just for the one post.

Standard 16-bit Unicode, it would be over $800K. Not bad, Chris... Not bad at all.

RickB-Astoria

You probably can keep at least 1%. Sure, Rem Koolhaas would make well on it.

Non Sequitur
So, is it kosher to not pay for any professional services in your world then? Hire and pay for an architect instead of seeking free services online you cheapskate.
May 30, 17 2:13 am
Greg A

I'm seeking free principles of architecture not free services...

Non Sequitur

You cheap asshole, you're looking to skip out paying for services.

First free principle of architecture: do it yourself. Or is that the first principle of free architecture?

Greg A

Look at you two salty architects, just trying to find a reason to attack. See previous comment to the other salty architect, I didn't say i wasn't hiring an architect... lol.

RickB-Astoria

You didn't say. You didn't hire one by trying to do it yourself. Your action speaks with more volume than your mouth or fingertips.

Non Sequitur

Loving the salty comments. Little does Mr. Super Star Finance Guru Greg know, but most of us here, myself included, are rather well employed, well compensated, and command hundreds in millions in projects every year.

RickB-Astoria

True, but then architectural professionals working primarily in residential architecture would be quite salty on average but yeah... the pay isn't entirely great considering the labor or headache and essentially the babysitting the client but the pay isn't too bad when accounting you take your account receivables compared to your account payables... if you do things financially right and you know how to charge enough.

randomised

Dear Greg,

Can you offer me some free financial advice? For instance, how to bill people who want my free architecture advice, advice I'm only able to provide after a lengthy and costly investment in my education and training on my part. Should I just give it away for free to every Greg, Dick  and Harry that comes along or do you have any insights from working in finance that could help me? Thanks!

May 30, 17 5:47 am
Greg A

Re free financial advice... I'd question a business model that demands payment for discussing principles of architecture... I'd also suggest you audit how you spend your time as posting sarcastic comments on a public forum can't be the best use of it ;)

Non Sequitur

Greg, this is not pinterest. You want to see what to do to look pretty? drive around your neighbourhood and see what others do. Don't try and sneak free services from us on your shitty house design/reno.

RickB-Astoria

Advice: Download and read this: http://academics.triton.edu/faculty/fheitzman/Vitruvius__the_Ten_Books_on_Architecture.pdf and after that, go to college for an architecture degree and while you are studying, go to http://www.miltonstricker.com and learn. Why do you expect us to teach you to become an architect and we don't get paid for it. Even the authors of architecture books get paid when you purchase it. Oh, yeah, as a common rule, you buy the book before can take it home from the book store to read it. If we freely give away what we spent money and a lot of hours to learn then we aren't going to be paying off those god awful student loans and be able to live the American dream of owning our own home and pay the bills to keep the roof over the head and food on the table to feed the family.

The very fact that you are designing this house without any form of architectural education and it is clearly shown in the amateur 3d model given with no good business or legitimate reason to do so instead of hiring an Architect or building designer/residential designer in the first place is indicative that your objective is to bypass paying what would likely be $10K to maybe $20K (or possibly more) in professional service fees for designing the renovation work. Considering what you are doing may cost you about $100K or more normally in construction cost. Especially if there is also interior aspects of the renovation. This is because you know you don't have the money or want to spend the money to have real professionals do the work of designing and building this. You said that you are having your structural engineer father involved. I don't see an issue of an S.E. taking care of structural issues but he's not an architect and his education would not encompass those things. Had you pursued an architect in the first place, the architect would have addressed not only the aesthetic issues but also could have adequately addressed the structural issues of a fairly basic house which is probably using largely conventional wood frame construction throughout with maybe a little irregular aspects but still well within the scope and capability of any competent design professional.

You are using the same old crap so many other dickweeds before you have already done. The reason is you don't understand what architects do and how they are a value to your project. You think all architects do is draw pretty pictures and that what is done is just about aesthetic concerns. Construction documents content are for more technical oriented than a 3d rendering. It is the design professional who does that. Architects are trained to look at design solutions holistically. Why the concern for aesthetics? How about when you try to sell the property in 10 to 20 years when you decide that you want to move somewhere else. Buildings/Homes is a major tangible investment that can be an asset or a liability. At some point, you want to make more than you spent renovating it plus the purchasing cost or you go out with a loss. Fugly buildings are hard to sell and when they sell, the price is almost dismal. On the other hand beautiful or at least aesthetically decent buildings will likely sell. There is a lot you don't understand but architectural design professionals are largely trained to take a holistic approach to the design challenges.

Not only do we look at issues from a structural and other technical perspectives, we also look at how each space relates to its neighboring and next greater context. We look at how the people experience the spaces. It is those things, you probably don't have a word for but you feel it when you experience a home or any building. It isn't about making a Taj Mahal, either or a Donald Trump style gold gilded gaudiness. It's about maximizing the experience of the home you live in within the relative budgetary concerns. Sure, it isn't going to be some castle for a british monarch. It could certainly be elegant, pleasant and well thought out even for the modest peasant but that's our trade secrets.

You can't expect Colonel Sanders to give away their secret recipes. Don't expect us to give away what we bill clients for. It's our instrument of service. Even in financial investment you won't be giving away how you determine the value of investments. You don't expect doctors to teach you what they learned in medical school and teach you how to practice the medical profession. You don't expect lawyers to train you in minutiae of law and everything you need to not need a lawyer anymore. None of them are in business to train you to not need their professional services. That goes against even the most fundamental business 101 principles. We have an interest in our job security just as you do. If you gave away to everyone you know about financial investment advising, you'd be out of a job before long because the people no longer need you. Why in the world do you think it is in our interest to give away the 'secrets' so you no longer need architectural design professionals to design your project. That's why YOU are suppose to hire an architectural design professional for your project (be it a licensed architect or an experienced but not necessarily licensed building/residential designer).

What you are and been doing is trying to be the "Architect" without any education in the field and try to get us to give away our professional training and expertise for free so that you can use it and never need an architect. If you want to learn the secrets, spend about 5 years in studies of architecture. Look at the curriculum and course materials and the books used in architecture school programs and learn them all. Whether you go to architecture school or use various architecture school programs as a guide for what to study.

Otherwise, I could suggest you learn from a correspondence school style 'architecture' education such as the one from SFIA (san francisco institute of architecture) - http://www.sfia.net

Until you take every course of their architecture education program, you have no business trying to be the "Architect" of this project. FREE ADVICE.... HIRE AN ARCHITECT OR RESIDENTIAL DESIGNER.

RickB-Astoria

Short version: Don't be a cheap ass dickweed that is trying to side-step using an architectural design professional when they should be paying for such professional service while also trying to pick our professionally trained brains for what we know without paying us. In the computer field, if you want me to fix your computer problems or even advise you on how to fix your computer issues, I get paid. Why would you expect otherwise for any other occupation. If you want to learn fundamental principles of architecture, there are tons of books on Amazon.com written by architects.

If you want more education but necessarily become a licensed architect.... maybe the correspondence school style program for SFIA (san francisco institute of architecture) - http://www.sfia.net might be of help you.

tduds

^^ Rich.

RickB-Astoria

Oops... notices a typo.... "...but necessarily..." should be "... but not necessarily...". Got to love it when someone at home draws your attention off for a brief moment and whatever. 

Either way, kind of funny to read that... he might very well need it just to get accepted into an NAAB accredited architecture program.... anyway.

Greg A

Saltiest of them all identified. Architecture must pay poorly for so many of you to be so salty. Come across to finance.

RickB-Astoria

Salty as the pickles you just slurped emphatically.

RickB-Astoria

Seriously Greg Anderson, when you and others like you don't first consult an architectural design professional to begin with like you should, then try to do this by yourself with only a structural engineer father only somewhat involved as if he was directly involved at a professional capacity, you wouldn't be making a serious & highly potential death trap along with several seriously design flaws that amounts to building code violations, then you come to us after making a cluster fuck of a mess and want us to give you professional advice for free? Suck and choke on the great salty pickle while you are at it. The pay does kind of suck when people like you don't want to pay and we have to spend an exorbitant amount of time to unmarry you from stupid ideas just so we can get things on track towards a proper design solution which you should have been at in the first place. Pay doesn't really pay for such exorbitant amount of labor it takes to unmarry people from stupid or misguided paths so they can get on a path that will address the issues, comply with the codes and is realistic with the building as it is that works in the real world.

When you consider that some people similar to yourself don't have the courtesy to pay on time. Dragging out the pay has ramifications on our own businesses. We deal with a lot of assholes in this profession.

RickB-Astoria

Take into consideration that when we design projects for client, we bear professional liability. Often decade long. This means, that if there is any errors or omissions done by us or even by others such as the builder, we get caught up in lawsuits that costs us money even when it isn't our own fault. You wouldn't be liable to squat for the most part. You wouldn't sue yourself. When we command a fee that commensurate of the professional liability that we bear for decade(s), the same kind of people as yourself would balk and whine that we are charging too much trying every tactic to push the design fee for as little as possible. You probably earn a salary of $90K to $100K+ a year. Those of us that works in the residential design sector is probably lucky to make that a year and only if we are so busy with projects that we have to work 60 to 100 hours a week. We get clients who treats us like shit because they think all we do is doodle pictures. Sorry, we are a lot more than an artist but yet far too many think we are just an artist and think we should be paid as a starving artist. Some people literally think all we do is a 5 minute napkin sketch and that we just run the napkin through a scanner and with a click of a button, the computer magically produces an architectural set of plans. Sure, we might be somewhat salty and miserable but for crying out loud, man, we are constantly dicked around by people trying to seek advice or other billable services without ever paying for it. I.M.Pei said this once..... "My name is I.M. Pei not I. M. Free". Do you think you would be happy if people kept coming to you and wanting free advice? Maybe it's free in their eyes from the bank because they have other avenues for earning income. If you are a private financial investment advising practice, you would find that to be entirely frustrating and if not irritating. You make money to boot as a financial investment adviser. Maybe not Donald Trump rich but well to do. It's not like you can't afford to pay the services of an architectural design professional. You do realize that most of us do in fact allow for a payment plan and even arrangements to pay portion of the service fees when you have the financial duck in row with lending sources. But then you should already calculate the fees of architectural/engineering services on top of the construction cost as you would the contractor's overhead & profit for a project cost budget and add about 20% for contingency at the very least. It comes to an outrageous level of insult when you would reasonably be able to afford the services of a design professional but won't. You did that prior to any sort of 'salty/miserable' response. You can't expect us to be jolly and happy to work for you when we have a good idea that you won't pay us or otherwise circle jerk around. You ask for professional services to given to you. What makes you such a special snowflake?

RickB-Astoria

Alright Greg Anderson, I'll say that I have been a bit salty / miserable to you. You said, " We want to have a reasonable idea about what we are thinking before approaching an architect... no point getting there and spinning our wheels." Here's the problem, you'll find that getting a shotgun of opinions from architects is kind of like the different opinions you'll get from a bunch of chefs. First thing I see is you are basing your renovation remodel design on poor existing building documentation. It's hard to assess your design on a poor execution of what your building currently looks like. I would recommend a better and very thorough set of drawings made of the existing building and good 3d model made. A method that could help produce more accurate model using a image/photo base modeling as well as some good set of measurements.

Not doing that part well, can result in a lot of trouble. This is where a design professional would be advisable to commission.

Greg A

RickB, it took a good while, but you should delete all your previous comments and just retain this last one.

RickB-Astoria

We can have the whole thread deleted after you're done. Users of the forum can't just delete posts so it would take a little work from the admin/mods. It would probably be better for the thread to get deleted when it's all done and over with.

Greg A

You're right Rick. I think i need to start a thread titled, ' How to avoid selecting a salty, miserable architect.' Will start it now.

RickB-Astoria

You should at the least figure out a solution to that one.

Featured Comment

Consulting starts @ $400 per hour plus expenses. 

You're going to need a lot of help if you want to fix that design.

May 30, 17 8:38 am
Non Sequitur

Your rates went up in your absence from the forum Miles. Business must be good.

The principles of architecture are Firmness, Utility, Delight.

How to actually achieve those principles is what you pay professionals for.
May 30, 17 8:39 am
geezertect

Great minds think alike. I didn't see your post when I posted mine

Greg A

Thanks Donna, any good book recommendations for a high level discussion on colour schemes? Not looking for anything too indepth, just the 101s?

RickB-Astoria

Take ARCH 101 at local university with an architecture program.

geezertect

Architectural principle:  Firmness, commodity, delight.  Look it up.

May 30, 17 8:52 am

I had a girlfriend like that.

proto

isn't the relevant principle here: the carpet should match the drapes?

Sam Apoc

Greg,

Paint that sh*t gold.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V35BNwfeDos

-Sam

May 30, 17 9:37 am
citizen

Sorry for the harsh words here, Greg.  Many folks on this forum are hardworking professionals who spend too much of their time trying to get residential clients to pay overdue invoices, on fees that have already been wheedled down, often for changes that go beyond the agreed-upon work scope.  It's an unfortunate part of small-scale residential practice: many clients are cheap and always trying to get work for free.

Fuses can be short toward requests for free "advice" (your original term, not "principles").  Providing advice is a service.

Archinect.com might learn a lesson from other websites' forums by sticking a "First-Time Posters FYI" thread at the top of the page.

May 30, 17 11:07 am

This has been raised before but as someone pointed out it would deprive us all of a lot of fun.

citizen

Agreed. I just think it'd be more sporting to post some kind of "Cheapskate Beware" notice somewhere. Not everyone who wanders on here asking a question deserves all the knives.

Greg A

Thanks Citizen. Miles, it doesn't appear like your kin are having fun lol. I am detecting a pretty satisfied undercurrent from a majority of the architects here!

citizen, thank you for being a good citizen! I'm too frustrated with learning Revit to play nicely today. I do think a "Non-architect newbie posting? Read this first!" sticky thread at the top of the forum would be an excellent idea. I'll float it past the Big Green Head.

Greg A

Oh no, Donna. I originally thought you weren't a salty architect... sigh another one bites the dust.

tintt

Hi Greg,

Colors can match your existing house colors. Like if your existing doors and windows are brown, so shall be your new doors and windows. If I were you, I'd protect those columns from car traffic... wouldn't want to back out of your garage and hit one and take it all down. Hiring an architect would help with more than just colors and I would def recommend it! You want your project to add value to your house.

May 30, 17 11:58 am
tintt

And your fence color... are you talking about the cream colored thing to the left? Why not just do a stained wood fence? Don't paint it.

Greg A

Fence doesn't exist yet, just the old fence on the block.

Greg A

Thanks Tintt, however we don't really like the existing green tint and were hoping to run with either wood textured trimming or a slate blue (still open to ideas). Most modernised brick homes appear to run with the slate blue, white, or wooden scheme. Is it simply a matter of having larger concrete footings with the columns?

tintt

Greg, It is too hard for me to tell what you mean by the rendering that you posted -- the existing trim is green? And you want slate blue? Sounds great if that is what you like. White could look good too, so could natural wood. Nobody can make that call from that rendering. And no, larger footings won't keep cars from hitting columns in your driveway. If your columns are steel you likely won't take them out with your car, but will cause damage to both posts and cars. Wood columns can get taken out by cars pretty easily (don't ask how I know). Columns in driveways can be done, just not good design. Perhaps you can explore suspending your deck with your architect. Google "suspended balcony" and see how they don't have columns but have cable tie-backs in hold them up.

tintt

Columns don't have to be at corners either. Pulling the supports towards the garage makes them less hazardous. I would post pics if I could figure out how but it seems you can't post pics in replies. Google image some stuff, see what you can see.

JonathanLivingston

http://imgur.com/w7YPwOG

May 30, 17 12:35 pm
Non Sequitur

It's probably a green roof over the 2nd storey balcony too.

RickB-Astoria

A-F***ing-MEN !!!

Greg A

Legend - thanks Jonathan.

Greg A

Re the steel columns, the house is kind of weird at the moment. It has three brick pillars with three garage doors, while it is symmetrical, we hate the three garage doors of all equal size!

citizen

Greg,

See Jonathan's free advice (critique) in the graphic posted above.

May 30, 17 1:05 pm
tintt

.

May 30, 17 3:02 pm
chris-chitect

I dare someone to draw a sketch of the aftermath when the teenage son takes out the center column with the family minivan...

May 30, 17 6:57 pm
tintt

My bet is on the frustrated housewife who hits it on the way out to the second or third run to the liquor store.

RickB-Astoria

I'll put my bet on both. The teenage son taking out the corner post and the housewife taking out the other corner post and the dog taking out the center post.

chris-chitect

I suspect the aftermath of a minivan striking the centre column would look as shown below.

Greg, you now have a highly valuable Frank Gehry design! Gehry would charge a fortune for this design, but the members of Archinect have provided this for free!

 

 

May 30, 17 7:17 pm

Is it just a weird coincidence how similar this house looks to the one in Miles' post here?

May 30, 17 10:06 pm
b3tadine[sutures]

No doubt this guy found that image, and came here for advice.

You're welcome.

arch76

Greg A-

Why not ask the person that did the rendering?

Or ask your Dad if he knows an Architect- It sounds like you have a design and construction community around you. Buy them a beer and chat about your project- Architects like IPAs

May 30, 17 11:22 pm
b3tadine[sutures]

I hate IPAs, I like salty beers.

Greg A

Hi Arch, I did the render myself in Realtime Landscape Architect. As an aside, i found the program very user friendly. The design part of the community is the only piece that is missing. Hence why i have started my fact finding mission on this forum. All other parties will be related.

arch76

I hate IPAs, I like salty beers.

arch76

%%UI hate IPAs, I like salty beers.-- i hope that worked.... don't think its html... I almost flagged that comment!

archi_dude

Greg,

I will totally give you the principles of color if you will give me the principles of rebalancing my portfolio if the Fed raises rates in June. Deal?

May 31, 17 12:01 am
Greg A

What does your portfolio consist of?

Greg A

Never mind, I looked at your post history with your salary detailed. I can hazard a guess at your portfolio and suggest you don't really need to worry about too much as your net worth would be in the family home.

archi_dude

But wait wait wait, I've got to ask...this isn't really your house right? Like do you really enter through an outhouse next to your neighbors trashcans? And it's not actually completely covered with that cheap faux thin brick veneer right? And the shape? I mean less is more but it's missing have the roof and then oddly cubist behind? And your solution is to attach a monolithic box to the front so now you've got three different houses fused as one? Hmmm well I guess when your used to wasting other people's money......

May 31, 17 12:15 am
Greg A

Entrance is currently on an angle, need to design the proper entrance. Just threw that in the model to start getting ideas. Re brick, it is double cavity brick (not thin veneer). Agree regarding the shape being rather rectangular.

Greg A

Lol, at your last comment. Looking at your post history. Salty, poorly paid architect confirmed.

Non Sequitur

Greg, you fool, you can't really be that dumb now can you?

Featured Comment

Greg, you asked for design advice. When professionals here suggested that you hire an architect you claimed that you were seeking "free principles of architecture" (with "principles" related only to your amateur design attempt). If you had really wanted to talk about the principles of architecture - rather than try to get some free advice - many professionals here would have happily engaged in a heated discussion over the very same. 

When you didn't get any traction with that line of bullshit you turned on the 'salty' professionals you had just begged free advice from. This is the behavior of a spoiled, petulant child.

Architects deal with people like you all the time. Your high-school level house "design" and parvenu sense of entitlement are nothing new. You're just another asshole with a bit of dough that thinks he's smarter than everyone else. We've seen it all before from people with a whole lot more money and intelligence than you.

So thanks for the chuckle, and good luck with that project. Please keep us updated on the progress, we can't wait to see how it turns out!

May 31, 17 12:46 am
Greg A

Thank you for the chuckle, Miles. I feel better about myself after our discussions here. I'm happy to work in an industry where people are generally happy (not too mention the $$$).

RickB-Astoria

Stick with your day job in Financial Investment Advice but hire architectural professionals for architecture stuff and stick with what you know instead of being an amateur trying to get professionals to give away their professional services for free that you would use in your project. Pay for it, don't be a cheapskate. No architectural professional is going to rubber stamp or otherwise entangle themselves in a decade long professional liability to your amateur attempt at architecture but professional level at death trap making. :-)

RickB-Astoria

Let me put it in perspective for you. If I was seeking out or needing the services of a Financial Investment Advising, I would seek out one like yourself just as I would seek out the advice of a doctor (and pay him/her) if I needed medical services. The same for a lawyer. I had spent a lot of time to learn on my own initiative about architecture. I went to college to further my knowledge and skills. Others have done much the same. While our individual paths varies, we done a lot more than you have. You ask for advice but you expect it to be free. I have had the fortune of friends who were licensed architects. However, I never sought them to teach me how to design a renovation of my own home. However, I did learn a lot that could be used but I also put my own effort. I'm not giving specific design directions for your project. There is potential liability risks that I would face especially if I am not getting compensation for the 10 years of liability insurance that I would face. Point is, if you are an amateur and you have no business playing "Architect" even if it is your own house. You don't appear to have the knowledge and skills in structural design such as sizing beams among many other code related issues.... some of which was "red-lined" for you. If you don't properly drain the roof of the rain water from the roof to proper drainage, it will cause you problems. We are not your personal architecture school and it will take you years to learn this stuff to competent level. It takes more than just fundamental basics. There is significant science behind all this. Architecture isn't devoid of an underlying engineering science that architectural professionals learn.

Greg A

Rick, you (along with all the other salty, 'underpaid' architects here who all think they are Frank Lloyd Wright's of architecture and God's gift) have missed the point.

Greg A

Who would blindly sign up to an architect without some understanding of what the architect is doing and just taking the architect on face value? Perhaps it is an inherent superiority complex that is wrong with the industry and making so many of you unhappy?

RickB-Astoria

1. You are an amateur. 2. With all due respect to Frank Lloyd Wright, I have a lot more college level education in architecture than he had. Nonetheless, I have great respect for his work but he also had good clients willing to pay and let him do his professional work 3. You began before you posted anything on this forum by playing "Architect" when you do not have the education & training in the field putting your family at potential risk by amateur design. You don't know what you don't know. 4. You come to professionals asking us for 'free' advice as it pertains to your projects. We can't give you advice on specifics on a project where we don't have any idea where it is located. There is a lot of legal stuff that in order to give you advice on, is subject to knowing where the project site is. Outside a valid academic institution, we can be held liable for the advice we provide with regards to an actual project. 5. I had already told you where to look for general principles of architecture. I already given provided that information. There are books on Amazon. There are architecture schools. There are a lot of sources. The fact you came to this forum instead of seeking those obvious sources for 'principles of architecture', it is obvious when reading between the lines of bullshit that you want to pick our brains about how to solve some problems with your design that you do not know with any certainty about. However, just advising you on a solution has potential liability risks that will last years. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to ascertain my real name and open a law suit. The same with many others on this forum. As for God's gift, that his humorous. As for us being Frank Lloyd Wrights' of architecture, I sure the hell hope we all are considering almost all of us architectural professionals have more then a couple of semesters of formal college level education in architecture.

RickB-Astoria

"Who would blindly sign up to an architect without some understanding of what the architect is doing and just taking the architect on face value? Perhaps it is an inherent superiority complex that is wrong with the industry and making so many of you unhappy?" Do you study everything about medical science to know what a doctor does. Of course not. Sure, we'll explain things to general extent and guide you along the process but there's no way in hell we are going to cram all those years of studies into your head in an hour's time. Sorry, this isn't the Matrix where we can just download this information into your cerebral cortex in matter of minutes. You can't be micro-managing it. We wouldn't be your employee. We would be independent contractors. What is involved in architectural service, to begin, we discuss your project with you. We take photographs, measurements of the property. We do legal background about applicable zoning and building code regulations. We develop a range of rough conceptual designs and revise them through a process of dialogue over the design with increasing level of detail. Early in the pre-design phase of a project, we discuss project details and then formulate a contract. In this initial consultation or group of consultations, we discuss these things. We don't start giving answers to your design problems until we have assessed them with everything from spatial-function requirements that would be outlined in an architectural program (that is usually part of defining the contract for the design phases. It is not uncommon to start with an initial contract for pre-design consultation services and as we wrap up that phase, we move to design services contract.

Please note, there are variations in how each of us approached this. 

Each phase of the design phases we signed off on approval of design direction and concept such as the rough concept path before moving into a more revised and detailed design and this process is signed off before we move to even more detailed design through iteration known as design development. Eventually, we arrive at the construction document phase and prepare the technical drawings for construction and permits. 

RickB-Astoria

Are you following along Greg Anderson? It is an iterative process that is on purpose to not overlook things and keeping on track with what our clients wants, needs, budget, regulations, etc. There is a lot involved. Bear with me, it's past midnight where I am at. One thing that is generally important for architectural professionals when working with an existing building is visiting the site. Looking at existing conditions of the building. It is not uncommon that before we do designing that we do a detailed building condition & assessment report to identify non-concealed issues that needs to be addressed before anything that may effect the design. There is always situations that may need to be looked at throughout construction that were concealed behind interior finishes and what not. If there are issues or potential issues, we have to note them. If they aren't addressed, they may pose problems during construction and even after.

shellarchitect

I love that greg has thrown in some good barbs, I hope he sticks around. 

some of us are too high and mighty for the work being done.  Who cares about a crappy residential remodel.  well over 90% of homes somehow get built without an architect, residential construction isn't rocket science and most of the contractors involved can barely read.  Anyone working in that field is asking for headaches.

I'd love to see how this develops.

May 31, 17 9:22 am
tintt

Oooooo, check out this balcony-over-the-driveway-with-columns I found on the internet. 

Image result for balcony over driveway

May 31, 17 3:46 pm
JonathanLivingston

That is nice.

JonathanLivingston

Greg, Keep working on your design, but have a professional help you. The thing is you don't know what you don't know. In the case of architecture there is a lot to know. I'm not going to belittle you for trying. An informed and engaged client can be a good thing. 

May 31, 17 4:08 pm
tintt

Supports don't have to be vertical columns. 

Bozich Residence #architecture

May 31, 17 4:23 pm
( o Y o )

Here's a nice one

May 31, 17 4:57 pm
tintt

Ya know, I've done three jobs for people who had careers in finance and they were the best clients. Never balked at the fee, in fact expressed that they thought it was low. I always wondered if that was maybe because they saw thousands of dollars, even millions cross their desks in a short time and got annual bonuses in the tens of thousands on top of their salaries. Plus, if you are into recognizing value, you recognize that architects provide value. Spend money to make money. 

May 31, 17 5:01 pm
dccolombo

Greg, Most of our firm's clients come in with some idea of what they are looking for.  We don't tell our clients what they want, we help them find it. By working together we create the right balance between form and function tailored to the individual.  My 30+ years of experience is a valuable commodity, likewise for anyone in a profession for a long time. Do you ask lawyers for free advice? Doctors? Do you give away free financial advice? (other than buy low sell high). 

Not all architects are the same, some are flat out bad designers as in "how did they pass the design test?" Find a good one by looking at the projects the firm has done. Then set up an appointment to meet them - for us, the first meeting is free. Following the meeting we send a letter proposal, if that is acceptable, we follow it up with an AIA contract.

If you are dead set against hiring a professional, then I will give this free advice. Read about good design and go to a lot of open houses.  Reading about good design will help with the exterior of the house - sorry it really needs help. Going to lots open houses will give you a feel for spaces - take note of how a house makes you feel. If you walk into a room that makes you uncomfortable figure out why and avoid that. If you see something you like, make note of that.

As for color advice? go to the paint store. They have colors that go together whether it's a monochromatic scheme or complimentary colors. Pick a scheme you like and go with it. Not rocket science. 

Jun 25, 17 7:15 pm

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