Archinect
anchor

Stair Detail

ellaine

Hello fellow architects!

For an interior design project I am working on, I would like to do the popular nowadays floor to ceiling tube railing like the one in this project:

https://afasiaarchzine.com/201...

I already have the metal structure of the stair in place: 

Wood boxes will come on top of the metal threads.
However, I am not sure what is the best way to do the detail of the railing and in particular how each tube attaches to a thread. There is the geometric problem that a tube should be longer that the distance between the thread and the ceiling, so how does it go in its hole? I have some ideas, but would love to hear from more experienced architects how you would do this detail. 

It is important to mention that the tubes should have a structural function too.  Thanks in advance!

 
Oct 24, 21 4:32 pm
Non Sequitur

I think your client is paying you for a design solution.  They are, however, not paying you to source free solutions.

My 2 cents' worth: it is literally impossible to offer any advice since we don't know anything about the project (ie. location, AHJ, code, use of space, budget, adjacent fixtures, etc)... so just do the cliche stainless steel cables and black square HSS with offstands and be done with it.

Oct 24, 21 4:43 pm  · 
4  · 

You have half of a copied stair built and you don't have a clue about how to finish it ... priceless.

Whatever you are charging it is waaaay too much.

Oct 24, 21 8:14 pm  · 
10  · 
b3tadine[sutures]

Bingo! I mean, I can't even.

Oct 24, 21 8:43 pm  · 
1  · 
Non Sequitur

Sweet exposed conduit detail below the feature stair.

Oct 24, 21 10:48 pm  · 
 · 
randomised

leave as is and sell it as industrial loftish

Oct 25, 21 2:40 am  · 
 · 
tduds

Where I'm from we design the whole stair before we build anything.

Oct 25, 21 10:55 am  · 
2  · 
randomised

In China they often start construction before anything is designed.

Oct 25, 21 12:07 pm  · 
2  · 
SneakyPete

I find it really difficult to keep my balance when the stair is made of thread.

Oct 25, 21 12:48 pm  · 
1  · 
ellaine

I agree with your criticism, but you are not being very helpful. I am designing this for my family so it's not a typical architect - client relationship. You are certainly right that it should have been designed before built. We planned on using ropes and I had relative clarity on this one, but we changed to rods recently for aesthetic reasons. 

In general, it's a pity that architects don't have a Q&A platform where they help each other with technical questions. For example, programmers have stack overflow, where I was able to find already asked and answered almost any question I ever had. There are also the grasshopper and rhino forums where the community is being extremely supportive, solving specific issues. Of course, a forum cannot replace education, books, research, experience etc., but can be really helpful in some cases, at least for hints and a starting point for further research. 


Oct 26, 21 6:59 am  · 
 · 
Non Sequitur

why again should we do your job, for free too? I have enough on my plate with my paying clients. Figure it out, that's the design challenge.

Oct 26, 21 7:17 am  · 
1  · 
Wood Guy

The regulars here are actually quite helpful when responding to others who have contributed to the forum previously and/or who we know are really architects with a challenging problem. Your post reads like many here by homeowners, students or real estate agents who want advice and no qualms with lying to get what they want.

Ass, grass or cash, nobody rides for free.

Oct 26, 21 8:16 am  · 
5  · 
ellaine

@NS then why reply to my thread at all?

Oct 26, 21 11:54 am  · 
 · 
ellaine

@Wood Guy so this is a forum for regulars only? How does one become a regular when one gets accused in lying right from the start?

Oct 26, 21 12:24 pm  · 
 · 
burgerbarn

Because you're looking to take advantage of people. Do the same thing anywhere else and the competent ones with actual answers will say the same thing. Stack Overflow isn't taking kindly to work-related or homework questions either. 

You are not exploring fundamentals or abstracts but rather seeking an easy solution so you can get work done and paid. This isn't a "need help modeling unique stairs for a school project or generate a parametric shape". Go ask your consultants for free answers, see if they oblige. Flip the scenario and you had the knowledge, would you even bother with a total anonymous stranger to give them every little detail?

Oct 26, 21 12:33 pm  · 
1  · 
ellaine

​Sorry for the many comments, I keep pressing enter. So if you are busy guys, I totally understand, you don't need to reply. But I don't understand your position that it is inherently bad to post such questions. Indeed, this is my first thread on this forum, but I contribute, for example, to a local professional group in facebook where many of the questions are from homeowners. If it doesn't take too much of my time and I know the answer, why not? Next time when I need help, somebody else will answer. What's the problem with students asking questions, come on!

Oct 26, 21 12:35 pm  · 
 · 
Non Sequitur

^ hey, you're not the boss of me. Don't you start trampling all over our day-time entertainment. But to WG's point... far too many people come here to ask for solutions or lazy shortcuts without ever contributing something themselves. I can understand that this is above the average int-des' scope (the int des in my office would never touch a typical stair, let alone a floating one), but it's not our responsibility to fill in the gaps. See my point above about missing info. You're probably better off just showing a few magasine pictures to a half-decent carpenter or misc steel guy and let them do it.

Oct 26, 21 12:37 pm  · 
1  · 
Wood Guy

There's a right way and a wrong way to join an ongoing conversation. (Threads in forums like this aren't really stand-alone discussions, but part of a larger conversation.) The wrong way is to barge in and say that you need something, without first introducing yourself, observing how others behave, or weighing in with your expertise on other parts of the conversation first. I spent several years on here learning the ropes before I started posting much, and I'm one of the newer "regulars."

I'm reminded of my mother-in-law, who is an inherently nice person but does not understand social conventions. I can't recall a time in the last 30 years where she doesn't enter a room, with others already chatting, by loudly announcing something that draws attention to her. It derails the conversation and annoys those conversing.

Oct 26, 21 1:21 pm  · 
4  · 
b3tadine[sutures]

You should consider the reason for the criticism, is due solely to your initial presentation of the questions. Not in the response. If you were more open in the question, the more helpful people here are likely to be. 


If you are looking for evidence of that thoughtful Q&A, review the recent thread on whether or not it made sense to go to architecture school. 


Thorough questions, that demonstrate both breadth of knowledge, lack solutions, open to questions, with all of the narrative presented, will bring a thoughtful response.


Or, you can have this.

Oct 26, 21 2:30 pm  · 
5  · 
CrazyHouseCat

Agree with some of the complaints that the original question was not super clear.  And apologies to those complaining about giving away free services, but this is a fun problem to play, for free.

Ellaine, am I correct to understand your question as: you’ve got threads (from a bolt or embed) in the ceiling poking down, and you know you’ll have threads from the wooden step poking up, so how to fit the tube perfectly between ceiling and wood tread? 

Let’s tackle one end at a time.  If you don’t have the threads poking up from the wood step, you could reasonably fit full length tube over the threads from the ceiling, yes? Provided you don't have very short distances.  So the real problem is the connection at the step.

The example in the link you provided gave away the answer.  Did you notice the cover / round plates at the bottom of the steps?  That’s likely a countersunk cover for the treat going through the step.  If threads go through the step, then the tubes above can be the full length, and the tread will thread into the tube from the below through the step.  And if this plate is connected (welded to) the thread, it’ll provide bearing on the step.  Is this the structural function you are looking for?

And how fortunate to have this awesome stair in your home!  Congrats!


Oct 28, 21 8:08 pm  · 
 · 

Block this user


Are you sure you want to block this user and hide all related comments throughout the site?

  • ×Search in: