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Cycling Central

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Knowing a lot of us value seeing the world from two wheels and also seeing a few posts in Automotive Central regarding bicycles, I thought it would be worth creating a space for us to talk cycling. Anything related is fair game: commuting, fitness, beach cruising, racing, road, track, mountain, gravel, cross, bike packing, cargo, electric, fat tires, skinny tires, cycling infrastructure (or lack thereof), your last ride, your next ride, etc.

What are you pedaling?

 
Apr 9, 21 1:38 pm
Non Sequitur

I'm in the market for a decent commuter/exercise cycle but I'm told I've pretty much missed the boat on spring/summer 2021 stock in my area.  

Apr 9, 21 2:31 pm  · 
 · 

You probably have. Start checking whatever the Canadian version of Craigslist is (is it just Craigslist?). In my college town the local police would auction off the abandoned bikes they'd get called to remove from bike racks, etc. Might also be a possibility to find something you could fix up.

Apr 9, 21 8:36 pm  · 
 · 
Non Sequitur

yeah, I know. Was looking at one of the big local shops earlier and they are now taking orders for 2023... maybe I just wait another year and fix up the 2 bikes I have in the backyard.  One is heavy & cheap CCM from 30years ago and another is suspiciously devoid of any branding... That one I got off craigslist 12years ago for a cool $100.  Came with free bike lock but no key.  It's got funky rear shocks.  

Apr 10, 21 12:19 am  · 
 · 
SlammingMiruvor

Does Canyon sell/distribute to/in Canada? Not the cheapest, but they're all good values.

Apr 12, 21 11:20 am  · 
 · 
Non Sequitur

^They do, at least they claim to ship up here. Slightly out of the range I was looking into but not by much. I'll keep it in mind as I navigate my options. I'm not willing to have my bike cost more than my car. 8-)

Apr 12, 21 11:35 am  · 
 · 
SlammingMiruvor

There is always the infamous Bikes Direct option, if you can assemble and tune a bicycle it's not a bad option.

Apr 13, 21 1:39 pm  · 
 · 

You haven't lived until you have a bike that costs more than your car. It was just last month that Canyon started shipping to Canada. https://cyclingtips.com/2021/03/canyon-launches-in-canada/

Apr 13, 21 2:06 pm  · 
1  · 
archanonymous

I have purchased and rode a BikesDirect bike and can report that they are fine and a great deal if you have ever built a bike from frame up, but best avoided otherwise. They are not hard to finish assembling and ride, but if you want it to be a good long-term bike, you'll take it apart completely and re-assemble it correctly. Little things like correct lubrication at threads, cable and housing lengths, derailleur tuning, etc will all be just slightly off.

Apr 13, 21 6:10 pm  · 
1  · 
Non Sequitur

Thanks folks. I have a local Giant shop here but they have no stock, obviously. 

Last night, I took out the 2 beat-up bikes I already own and set up a work bench in the backyard. I took apart cables and breaks and whatnot and determined that one of them is salvageable, for now. I'll wait out the current shortage by replacing parts.

Apr 14, 21 9:09 am  · 
2  · 
Non Sequitur

Also, looks like Bikesdirect does not ship up here (http://www.bikesdirect.com/canada/). They suggest canucks set up a US mailing location and drive across to pick up. Not really something that is feasible at this time.

Apr 14, 21 9:28 am  · 
 · 
Bench

you can also try ChainReactionCycyes.com, shipping/customs is included for anywhere

Apr 14, 21 9:30 am  · 
 · 
senjohnblutarsky

1974 Gazelle Champion Mondial with a 9 speed/10 speed Shim-ergo mashup group set. 

It's on my trainer at the moment.  

Also have a cannondale hardtail that needs to be ridden. 


Apr 9, 21 4:28 pm  · 
1  · 
atelier nobody

Wow, '74! I had a '70s Motobecane that my dad handed down to me ca. 1980 when he upgraded - I pounded the hell out of that thing through the '80s.

Apr 10, 21 4:15 pm  · 
 · 
Wood Guy

My first "grown-up" bike, after riding BMXs through my childhood (including one with a banana seat--it was the 70s/early 80s), was a Stump Jumper rigid frame and random parts assembled by a bike-nerd family friend (and our Volvo mechanic) in the early 90s. I rode the hell out of it through college, when I spent more time in the woods (Middlesex Fells Reservation near Boston) than in class. Some of the guys I rode with raced competitively and I could keep up with them; they encouraged me to race but I never did. 

After college I bought an aluminum Schwinn with front suspension--state of the art at the time, with rear suspension still a pretty new concept. I rode the hell out of that until I had several mostly unrelated injuries and I haven't been on the bike since, about 15 years now. I've tried taking up running but I get hurt doing that too. One reason we bought the old farm we did a few years ago is the 30 acres of woods where I could make trails for walking and biking. We have almost 200' of vertical drop across our property so it would be fun, at least on the downhills, and good exercise on the uphills. Road-riding around here would be way too dangerous--all hills and big trucks with no shoulders on the road, so my woods is my best bet for local riding. 

So this thread is timed well, as I've been thinking lately that I want a new mountain bike. I'm not sure where to start, as I've been out of it for so long. I'm relatively old and out of shape but always loved bicycling. 

Apr 9, 21 4:55 pm  · 
1  · 
atelier nobody

In my neighborhood, banana seats were second only to sissy-bars in uncoolness - we all saved up our allowances to ditch them and put BMX seats on our Stingrays.

Apr 10, 21 4:17 pm  · 
1  · 
Wood Guy

It was the height of fashion in 1979 rural Maine. I'm not sure about earlier or later than that...

Apr 12, 21 10:44 am  · 
 · 
Wood Guy

Since you posted your banana seat bike below, I'll post mine here--except mine was the Red Fox, not the Silver Fox: 

Apr 12, 21 10:55 am  · 
 · 

Glad to see this already getting some traction (pun intended) while I was getting distracted with actual work.

My first bike as an adult was a Raleigh hardtail I bought to get around campus, but ended up using it in the mountains more. When I moved further from campus I got into road bikes and skinny tires as a way to get to campus faster and more efficiently. I eventually sold the Raleigh and have stuck with various road bikes over the years. I've thought about getting a mountain bike again as there are some great trails near me and I've got a decent group of friends who'd be able to show me around, but for now I'm sticking to paved roads and relatively smooth gravel (I can get some wider tires on one of my road bikes that does ok on the gravel when I want to get away from traffic completely). 

First on my list of most likely bike purchases is an e-bike of some sort. I'm currently debating between a cargo bike that can replace a lot of the local trips I use my car for, or something still based on a road bike geometry, but still light enough to make the commute a little easier or faster when I don't feel like a workout. I'm a little over 20 miles from the office with around 1,500 ft. of elevation gain one way, and while I will ride that as my commute occasionally, it takes time and an e-bike could make it that easier and more likely for me to do it more often. I've taken my wife's e-bike out for some rides and while I know it can do the trip, it's heavy and I don't think it makes me all that much faster overall. I'm faster uphill for sure, but downhill it tops out around 20 mph and then uses regenerative braking to scrub the excess speed, recharge the battery, and extend the range a little. Anyway, I'm leaning toward a cargo bike, but still exploring other options.

My two current bikes are both road bikes, one carbon, one aluminum. Carbon one is built up to be light, fast, and fairly understated. It's a shame I don't have the legs to really ride it like it deserves. The aluminum one is newer and set up as a commuter/rain bike (full fenders, hydraulic disc brakes, electronic shifting so no cables to get rusty). Still fast and is well regarded as a superior frame for crit racing and one I can take the long way home at times, or throw on the bus's bike rack without being completely freaked out it's going to get damaged by someone else throwing their bike up there too. I did one road race on the carbon frame years ago and won, but it was a pretty small field and the guy I expected to win was racing with a cold that day (I got a gap on a climb and soloed 11 miles to victory ... guy with the cold came in third by winning the field sprint).

Apr 9, 21 8:31 pm  · 
4  · 
Wood Guy

Hey, a win is still a win ;-)

Apr 9, 21 8:47 pm  · 
2  · 
whistler

I enjoy the road biking around my region but it's pretty much known as Mountain Bike Mecca so when in Rome... !

Currently sporting a Santa Cruz Hightower for fat tire adventures and a Giant TCR Advanced SL for skinny tire rips. Not sure the whole gravel bike thing is a go for me, but if the whole n+1 equation prevails I would certainly consider the gravel rig.  Better yet with the danger on the road these days the gravel bike could be a safer bet rather than the Road bike.

Office is considering buying an E-Bike for site visits etc still not sure we would use it enough but definitely could see myself going that direction once zee knees give out.

Apr 9, 21 8:54 pm  · 
1  · 
archanonymous

I'm about to buy a new road bike and all the models I'm looking at take up to 32c tires and have disc brakes. That would have been a full-on CX bike 10,15 years ago. 

I figure I can sell my gravel bike then and replace it with a fast hardtail which will let me shift my main MTB to a full-sus. (Talk about n+1 syndrome.) 32c tires are plenty for anything I'd want to ride on drop bar bike anyways.

Apr 13, 21 6:07 pm  · 
1  · 
citizen

[Wondering if I should post here, or start Spandex Central thread instead.]

Apr 9, 21 10:15 pm  · 
3  · 

No spandex required, but if that’s your thing, I won’t stop you.

Apr 10, 21 12:42 am  · 
2  · 
Wood Guy

I was actually wondering if a Fashion Central thread would get any interest. I have little fashion sense myself but appreciate those who do.

Apr 10, 21 8:45 am  · 
1  · 
atelier nobody

I'd chime in on a Fashion Central thread - my "signature look" is my large collection of paisley shirts.

Apr 10, 21 4:20 pm  · 
2  · 
citizen

I have zero fashion sense, and have to rely on my great personality to make up for that.

Apr 10, 21 4:58 pm  · 
 · 
luvu

Finally we have a thread about bike/cycling , thanks to EA.

I've been following cycling ( road ) for ages... and now to be able to pass on the love of cycling to my little 7 yr old son is something really special for us. We always ride and watch all the grand tours/classics together  ( he knows all the winners of Tour de France by year way back to 1980 !).

Recently just bought an alloy ( Scandium) bike from a Berlin-based brand, one of the best alloy bikes I've ever ridden/owned. The other two are a titanium (No.22) which i use dailly to commute to work / such a great all-round bike. The pride and joy bike though is from a boutique brand, locally-built ( made less than 2 KM from our house ) custom made carbon bike, I just love every thing about it, it's such a well crafted-machine.

If the weather is allowed we might go out and ride on our local cobblestone roads. It's our new family tradition that we do on the Paris-Roubaix race day ( I know it's been postponed to October, sadly ).

That's it for me for now.
Vive le Velo...

Apr 10, 21 12:03 am  · 
3  · 
Abie

This pandemic is really encouraging more people to ride bikes to avoid the public commutes. A booming business indeed :)

Apr 15, 21 1:10 pm  · 
 · 
RJ87

In the college days I had a mystery brand road bike that I enjoyed riding to class / friends houses. I say mystery brand because by the time it came into my possession the frame had been painted all matte black. Post college the infrastructure where I live doesn’t have enough bike lanes & I don’t have enough love for cycling that I’m willing to have everyone on the road frustrated as they try to navigate around me. So I’m now the proud owner of a stationary bike that I ride while watching Netflix. We live within walking distance of a brewery / restaurant district that I could easily ride neighborhood roads over to without disrupting traffic, so my wife and I may eventually get another pair of bikes if we buy in this area. May just spring for a golf cart though that would be more kid friendly.

Apr 10, 21 10:15 am  · 
1  · 
tduds

My ride: 

I haven't ridden in a few months, but the spring weather is here and the after-work light is good for some short training loops soon! 

Apr 10, 21 3:11 pm  · 
8  · 
tduds

& yes, the paint job is 90% of the reason I bought it.

Apr 10, 21 3:12 pm  · 
1  · 
atelier nobody

First bike I had without training wheels:

Easy Rider: 1971 Raleigh Chopper Mk 1 – Barn Finds

Apr 10, 21 4:22 pm  · 
5  · 
luvu

100 % paint job the reason I bought mine ...

Apr 10, 21 8:35 pm  · 
3  · 
luvu

anyone else have an orange (ish) bike ? ..ha

Apr 10, 21 8:38 pm  · 
 · 
tduds

That is a very sexy paint job luvu

Apr 12, 21 12:09 pm  · 
1  · 
archanonymous

luvu - beautiful Standert, looks fast!

Apr 12, 21 1:10 pm  · 
1  · 
archanonymous

Nice one tduds, I have an AC for one of my bikes and the paint is amazing.

Apr 12, 21 1:10 pm  · 
1  · 

For orange(ish) bikes, I had a Jamis with a copper color scheme...

Apr 13, 21 11:26 am  · 
1  · 
luvu

nice one EA..

Apr 14, 21 6:52 am  · 
 · 
atelier nobody

I was a pretty avid road cyclist about 40 years ago. Now I'm old and fat and have been looking for a decent inexpensive bike to get back into some kind of shape.

All the bikey web sites "budget" recommendations start at about $600 - since I'm a long way from being a serious cyclist again, if ever, I'm hoping to find something in the ≤$350 range that is better than the $50 Walmart special.

Apr 10, 21 4:12 pm  · 
 · 

You should ask how much axonapoplectic wants for their vintage road bike.

Apr 11, 21 12:35 am  · 
 · 
axonapoplectic

I spent the past few months looking around at ebikes. I really like the look of the vanmoof, but it’s controlled via your phone and you can’t remove the battery for charging, which means I’d have to schlep the entire bike inside every night - and I’d have to make sure it was fully charged before I went to the office. I ended up going with the rad city - mostly because it is cheap, built like a tank, and has a removable battery. I haven’t gotten it yet, but am looking forward to seeing how fast I can get in to the office. 


I own several bikes - a vintage road bike (which I rarely use anymore), a full size folding bike, a long tail cargo bike (which I used to use for grocery runs until the pandemic), and a hybrid commuter that has seen a lot of miles.

Apr 10, 21 6:50 pm  · 
2  · 

The rad city is a tank (that’s what my wife is riding). So much fun to ride. You’ll love it.

Apr 11, 21 12:40 am  · 
1  · 
axonapoplectic

I am really hoping that battery prices continue to drop and by the time the battery wears out on that thing (probably around 4 or 5 years with how much I plan to be riding) it’ll be maybe $200 to replace instead of $450.

Apr 11, 21 12:04 pm  · 
 · 
randomised


This is my other bike, a so-called pastors bicycle with added bicycle seat in the back and crate for shopping in the front (the cross in the frame is so the pastor could step on the bike in their robe, see below)




Apr 11, 21 3:11 pm  · 
3  · 
axonapoplectic

Really like that frame.

Apr 12, 21 7:07 am  · 
 · 
randomised

Me too, love the strength and stability of the frame and the ease of stepping on with a child seat on the back as you can't swing your leg over the seat, as you would normally do, without decapitating the kid...

Apr 12, 21 7:30 am  · 
1  · 
proto

in the garage: cannondale caad 10

in the basement: KHS dirt jumper, Giant hardtail 29er (4” travel), Soma Rush fixie/ss 

Was a daily bike commuter 8yrs ago, now just ride for fitness

Apr 11, 21 7:42 pm  · 
1  · 
archanonymous

Yeah, I ride bikes.

Apr 12, 21 11:29 am  · 
5  · 
x-jla

I love riding, but my sciatica is aggravated by it.  I have a Trek.  Good bike.  I rode it like 5 times over the last 2 years...wish someone would design a back friendly bike for old beat up punks like me.  

Apr 13, 21 3:55 pm  · 
 · 
JonathanLivingston

You need something more upright probably. You should take what you have to a bike fitter, they can make it a lot better swapping some parts like stem, crank length, and seat position, so you are much more efficient as you age.

Apr 13, 21 4:49 pm  · 
1  · 
x-jla

Yeah, I’m not too old, and in good shape, but the hunching over is so rough on the back. I’ll look into that though. Thanks

Apr 13, 21 4:55 pm  · 
 · 

Getting set up with a fitter is a good recommendation. Something I probably need to do anyway as I'm always dealing with little annoying pains and stuff.

If you need a new bike, check out the Trek Domane. It's a bit more relaxed and comfortable and has some fancy bits that soften the ride.

If a road-style frame is just too hunched over, try looking at mountain bikes or hybrid/commuters. They'll automatically put you into a more upright position which a lot of people find more comfortable anyway.

Failing that, you could always get bent. By that I mean get a recumbent.

Apr 13, 21 5:32 pm  · 
 · 
archanonymous

Saw a dude smoking a fat cigar riding a recumbent the other day. I was confused/ impressed. Hope he had a trippel in his bidon to match.

Apr 13, 21 6:02 pm  · 
1  · 
JonathanLivingston

I love riding. My table has a couple of road bikes Carbon Felt F70, BMC time machine, a Motobecane commuter cheapy, and my favorite a SS cyclocross bike that is an absolute blast on singletrack.  I love watching the mounties look of astonishment when you blow by them. We also have a Peloton (I'm ready for the ribbing but that thing is addicting and the view is good). I just however picked up a 2 stroke Yamaha XSR750 for longer "work" trips so I'm headed to the gasoline dark side but at least it's still a bike. 

Apr 13, 21 4:47 pm  · 
1  · 

+1 on the Peloton. We got one not that long ago. I was skeptical of the whole thing myself at first. I still find a lot of the "you can do anything" affirmation talk from the instructors a little over the top, but I really like just being able to get on and get a workout done without really needing to think about it. I don't know if I'm addicted to it yet, but I've been pleasantly surprised.

Apr 13, 21 5:48 pm  · 
 · 
archanonymous

If I went to a Peloton/ Zwift + smart trainer I'd lose the smug superiority of sweating out intervals on my rollers with eurobeats pumping. And there's nothing architects crave more than smug superiority.

Apr 13, 21 6:01 pm  · 
1  · 
proto

my understanding of zwift is that it is better than fentanyl...i'm using the propective cost of a new kickr as my preventive cost hurdle [for the moment i'm not sure you could even get one anyway]...and the seasons are changing

Apr 13, 21 7:38 pm  · 
 · 
JonathanLivingston

Zwift is definitely more of a biking experience.  We opted for the peloton because the spin class vibe was more approachable for my wife, it's also nice and heavy equipment. You can really go hard, crank on it, throw your weight around and not worry, unlike the trainer where I feel like if I sprint that hard I could damage my bike or flip over. 

Opps that should have been in response to above

Apr 13, 21 8:38 pm  · 
1  · 

I'll continue down here so as not to disrupt the timeline...

The Peloton was completely for my wife and the price was right (check out The Comeback program they have). I was on the fence about a smart trainer, or a power meter, and doing the Zwift or Trainer Road thing that way. When we found out she was getting the bike, and the subscription would cover the household, I opted for pedal-based power meter so I could put them on the Peloton and use it for training with proper power. My plan was to try the Peloton classes and see if they worked for me. If not, I'd look more seriously at Zwift or TR. So far the Peloton power zone workouts have hit the spot.

I'm also really glad I got the power meter pedals because the power from the Peloton is low. For example: Peloton shows power for my last workout at about 125 W avg, 180 W max. The pedals were showing about 150 W avg, 245 W max. Been trying to figure out if I care enough to try to recalibrate the magnets to the flywheel, or just let it go. Currently I don't really care. I look at the power zone on the Peloton and my Garmin and hit my targets that way and so far it works out. I'm doing the work, just the Peloton thinks my FTP is lower than it actually is.

Apr 14, 21 1:10 am  · 
 · 
JonathanLivingston

I don't have any way to measure power on the peloton like your pedals but I can confirm I can put out way more watts with my stages meter on a crank than I can on the peloton. and I don't think that's true, cause you can put way more leverage into the big steel stationary bike. Pelotons power is a calculated simulation, like what strava produces based on speed and some other input, like space of magnets/resistance factor. Basically, I agree it's not accurate, but it makes up for that in consistency so it is effective. Actually way more than my meters on bikes. I can find it really interesting to watch power on a set interval on the peloton. I can usually see a day or two before I get or feel sic k, power drops.

Apr 14, 21 1:31 am  · 
 · 

Based on what I've looked into, the output readout on the Peloton screen is simply a calculation of the pedaling cadence and the resistance knob. Pedal at X rpm and Y% resistance and you get Z watts output. The calculation on my bike is correct ... that's all in the software.

My issue is that I think the magnets are closer to the flywheel than they should be. If that's the case, my magnets are creating more resistance than the computer thinks they are. Consequently, the software calculation says I should be putting out like 200 W and that's what shows on the screen ... but I'm actually putting out more because the bike doesn't have anything (i.e. strain gauge) to actually measure output. It doesn't know the magnets are causing more resistance than they should be on the flywheel because they were set up too close. It's like always riding with a brake pad rubbing and then going by the estimated power on Strava. The calculation will always be less than what you were actually putting out because Strava didn't know you had a brake pad rubbing that was constantly working to slow you down.

That being said, I haven't checked the precision of my pedals to know if they are correct. I have no reason to believe they aren't, but as long as I can have consistent numbers from the pedals across my bikes, I'm good.

FWIW, my pedals state they are accurate to +/- 1% from the factory. Peloton says their bikes are accurate to +/- 10% from the factory. I'm trusting my pedals.

Apr 14, 21 1:48 am  · 
 · 
Bench

JL - funny you say that about throwing weight around on a trainer, I'm a relatively large person and the old-school 'dumb' trainer is the only thing i can fit in the tiny apartment. Due to the lack of extraneous stability i have to keep the body form to a very small window, mostly in the drops. I'd love a setup that was more forgiving, but im pretty hardy for getting outside so its only about 3 months of the year that I actually train indoors. I have to train by HR monitor for zones, but i may convince myself to pick up metered pedals if the right deal comes along.

Apr 14, 21 8:39 am  · 
 · 
archanonymous

@Bench - if you are on slightly older rim-brake bikes, I snagged a hub-based power meter built into a clincher wheel for like $125 on ebay not too long ago. Works great for training at least. When combined with a wheel-on trainer or rollers it makes for a very cost-effective winter solution.

Apr 14, 21 9:45 am  · 
1  · 
Bench

AA - thanks for the suggestion, I was not aware those existed. Unfortunately I also train on my secondary track bike setup to the mag-resistance trainer, so the likelihood of compatibility is probably a no-go. Admittedly the nice thing about the pedals would be that they are a solution to both winter training and then for use during racing/training in the summer. And based on EA's comment above, the accuracy is probably unbeatable. I just still can't believe how expensive they are, for an item that seems likely to take a beating.

Apr 14, 21 10:34 am  · 
 · 
archanonymous

Ooof, yeah the pedals are so expensive. I use SPD-SL cleats anyways so they were never an option until Garmin's recent release.

Apr 14, 21 11:07 am  · 
 · 
JonathanLivingston

$1200 for pedals! I hope those prices come down. I guess you can buy just one side but that feels like I would be disappointed. I have also trashed numerous pedals over the years so I would be hesitant to make them my most expensive component. But the interchangeability is really nice.

Apr 14, 21 11:18 am  · 
1  · 

Re: one-sided options ... I bought the two sided, and while I am glad I did just to be able to see that I'm not unbalanced ... I also now know that I probably don't need dual sided. YMMV. My recommendation would be just go one-sided unless you have a serious reason to believe that you put out more power with one leg. Alternatively, ask around your friends to see if any of them have dual-sided power you can try out for a week or two to check if you're unbalanced.

Check pricing on the Garmin Vector 3 pedals if you're seriously considering it. The Vector 3 pedals are shipping with all the upgraded bits to correct the battery issues that they had initially ... the same upgraded bits that are being used in the Garmin Rally pedals. Bonus, while the Vector 3 is Look Keo, the new Rally conversion kits to SPD-SL are compatible with Vector 3 pedals so you could change them out if you absolutely needed SPD-SL cleats ($200 just to convert cleats seems steep to me though). I can't tell much of a functional difference between those two cleats myself, so while I have ridden SPD-SLs in the past, I'm also fine with the Keo cleats.

You could also look into the Favero Assioma pedals which have tended to be a little cheaper but still very accurate, and a lot of people are super happy with them. Although I did just check and they appear to be around the same price at the moment as the discounted Garmin pedals. I also don't think they have a SPD-SL conversion kit either, but that may be changing now that Garmin offers one.

Personally, I prefer Speedplay cleats and pedals, but I bought my Vectors before the Wahoo Speedplay announcement for their power meter pedal which still isn't available yet. So far my knees haven't complained too much with the Keo cleats (I need to see a fitter anyway which might solve any little issues I'm seeing with them). In a few more years with a track record behind them, the Wahoo Speedplay POWRLINK Zero pedals might be my next set of pedals.

Apr 14, 21 12:38 pm  · 
 · 
Bench

Great thread. Wasn't sure if people here would be on it.

I race both track and criterium. I had not planned to get *this* into it, but when everything shutdown last March it ended up being essentially the only activity i could safely do, either on my own or in very small (~4) masked groups spread out apart. Fortunately I have a great crew of friends that I can train pretty hard with a few times per week. And the silver lining was that once the city emptied out, riding (fixed) became a totally new experience. I managed to pick up some hefty KOM's that would never have been possible with normal traffic congestion.

Normally I try to aim for roughly 150 miles per week, although that's dependent on both the work and race schedule.

Apr 14, 21 8:36 am  · 
5  · 
JLC-1

I had an old pinarello road bike and a newer motobecane 29er, sold the pinarello when I moved house and gave the 29er to my son to use in college, and was stolen on campus. Now I only have the stationary spinner.

Apr 14, 21 12:45 pm  · 
 ·  1

Thumbs down only because that's a sad story. Been there, done that on the selling bikes before a move. I had an old Pugeot fixie conversion I scraped together that I sold before moving once and I regret it to this day.

Apr 14, 21 2:50 pm  · 
1  · 
JonathanLivingston

Yeah, super bummer. I had a fixie once. Before it was cool. It was the only thing I could do after I mangled a derailer hanger on an old Japanese fuji, Learned the joy of riding fixed. but It was stolen my first day of grad school off a rack right in front of the building in broad daylight. smashed a combination lock. It was too cool for me. I still do double-takes when I see bikes like it. still hurts.

Apr 14, 21 2:56 pm  · 
1  · 
archanonymous

I sold a custom-built single speed Independent Fabrications cross bike for a move. A bike that I still long for to this day...

Apr 14, 21 3:05 pm  · 
2  · 
JLC-1

I had a loaned fixie in lake tahoe, and it was wonderful in steep inclines.

Apr 14, 21 4:03 pm  · 
1  · 

Moving to an area with more steep inclines was actually one of the reasons I decided to sell the fixie. I have to be really creative to find a ride longer than a handful of miles where I don't get over 1000' of elevation gain. I'll hit climbs with double digit grades on just about every ride whether I want to or not. Even then, I still wish I had that bike.

Apr 15, 21 11:15 am  · 
1  · 
tduds

I had a fixie / single speed (idk the term for it.. the rear wheel was flippable & had a cog on both sides) when I lived "downtown", but it was useless for rides outside of the central city grid. Upgraded to real gears when I moved to "the burbs", but I still love that indestructible cheap hunk of steel.

Apr 15, 21 11:56 am  · 
1  · 
JonathanLivingston

Fixie = no freewheeling, Single speed is the side of the hub that spins freely to coast. The fixy is efficient uphills until it's too much. a workout going down too though. I ride a SSCX bike and if I'm with others is a hilarious leapfrog pursuit of spinning my brains out on descents and flats and then passing them when the grade turns up and they downshift. SS is not for socialization.

Apr 15, 21 12:22 pm  · 
 · 
Bench

I've considered picking up a freewheel cog for the training track bike solely for using on hill-ride training days. A couple friends and i will do routes of about 5000' climbing on fixed without problems going up, its spinning out on the descents that gets truly hairy. Having a freewheel would be great just for getting down... we can smash out pretty heavy gearings going up.

Apr 15, 21 12:37 pm  · 
 · 

One of my all-time favorite rides was a 40 mile mostly gravel ride I did on my fixed gear with a couple of friends just exploring some back roads. It was absolutely not the right bike for the terrain, but it was all I had that could fit a tire even remotely wide enough (28s) to even attempt to manage the gravel. Walking up the steepest hills because you could not power up the climb without losing traction on the gravel, and then desperately trying to slow down without skidding and losing the rear wheel on the descents. Despite all of that, I'd still do it again in a heartbeat. Maybe with a single speed with proper brakes instead of a fixie though.

Apr 15, 21 12:55 pm  · 
 · 

Grew up riding the trails in BC, the mecca for mountain biking. Been my passion to this day. Currently riding a 2021 Commencal Meta Power, 2016 Specialized Stumpy (currently converting to a 1x12), and have been letting the dust settle on my road bikes, a Specialized Tarmac and old Bianchi hardtail that I converted to a street commuter. Riding with LA traffic is a death wish, I like to keep it on dirt mostly. 

Apr 14, 21 1:53 pm  · 
3  · 
JonathanLivingston

Ha, I tend to feel the opposite. Every time I go mountain biking, especially downhill, I hurt myself. It just becomes more and more fun until suddenly it's not.

Apr 14, 21 2:57 pm  · 
 · 

Yes, chances of going down are way higher on the trails, but there's nothing more terrifying than giant SUV's driving inches away at 50mph. Par for the course in LA.

Apr 14, 21 4:08 pm  · 
 · 
archanonymous

It's fun to injure yourself, it's not fun for someone else to injure you.

Apr 14, 21 5:39 pm  · 
5  · 
JonathanLivingston

Can we make cycling the new golf?  FREE DESIGN MEETINGS to anyone willing to have the meeting on a bike ride.  

Apr 15, 21 12:23 pm  · 
4  · 
archanonymous

Please yes.

Apr 15, 21 12:31 pm  · 
 · 
JLC-1

done


Apr 15, 21 12:31 pm  · 
 · 

I've had reps offer bike rides before (more social than business, but we could talk a little shop if needed). I haven't taken them up on it yet, but I might at some point. One of my supervisors at a previous firm rode quite a bit and we'd sometimes take off a few hours early on a nice day and go for a ride as a "performance review" or "department meeting."

Apr 15, 21 1:01 pm  · 
 · 
tduds

This is actually not uncommon in the PNW.

Apr 15, 21 1:13 pm  · 
3  · 
randomised

That's a beercycle, used in Amsterdam for Brits having their bachelor party:

(they are banned now from the city center, too many "accidents")

Apr 15, 21 3:04 pm  · 
 · 
JonathanLivingston

"Business Development" and associated "Marketing Expenses" 

Apr 15, 21 1:08 pm  · 
 · 

There was a time when it seemed like every photo shoot for someone's modern home design included a bike (usually a single-speed or urban bike of some sort) hanging on, or leaned up against, the wall like a piece of functional artwork. I've been seeing less and less of those over the years, but they still show up here and there. 

Has anyone else noticed this, or is it just me?

From an older ArchDaily article as an example

Apr 15, 21 1:37 pm  · 
 · 
archanonymous

Did notice at the time, yes. Now I feel it's more common to see a high-end road bike.

Apr 15, 21 2:03 pm  · 
 · 
JonathanLivingston

Or a Peloton

Apr 15, 21 2:34 pm  · 
 · 

There's a twitter thread for Peloton placement ... and it's hilarious. https://twitter.com/ClueHeywood/status/1089699762331217920

Apr 20, 21 11:47 am  · 
2  · 
Wood Guy

A few years ago an old friend asked for a design for a bicycle-based coffee cart. She lives on an island off the coast of Maine and wanted to be able to serve the lobster fishermen as well as tourists. Her plans changed but it was a fun design project. I did full shop drawings so she and her carpenter friend could build it themselves. 

Apr 20, 21 12:16 pm  · 
3  · 

Nice WG! Hope that awning material is easy to see through.

Apr 20, 21 1:07 pm  · 
1  · 
Wood Guy

Thanks! That was the idea, twin-wall polycarbonate. Not my first choice but she provided me with the bike specs and what she had to carry, so I figured the short ride from her coffee shop to the wharf where she would set up would be doable looking through clear-ish plastic. But then her (rented) shop had repeated sewer failures/backups and she had to close the business, so as far as I know the bike never happened.

Apr 20, 21 1:42 pm  · 
 · 
Non Sequitur

This is one of the local breweries near my house.  They built this keg bike a while back and used to tour festivals.  I'm told it's a bitch to steer when full.

Apr 20, 21 12:23 pm  · 
3  · 

Anyone doing any rides on roads closed for the winter before they reopen for cars? I know various mountain passes, etc. get closed for the winter and there is usually a small window where you can ride them before they are open to car traffic. For example, Glacier Point Road is one in Yosemite that is fairly well known for this that opens up to car traffic tomorrow morning. Can't beat the view either ...

Image source

I'm contemplating a big ride this weekend on a closed road if the weather cooperates and they've cleared enough of it. Even if it's not clear to the top of the pass, there should still be plenty of car-free riding ahead of me. Some great views too, although not quite like the one above. 

Another factor is the time required. Pretty much a full day needs to be devoted to this with travel and the ride itself and well ... that's hard to get scheduled just right. I need some time away from work though. So even though I'll probably be in the dog house, I'm going to be a bit selfish.

Final factor is fitness. If the full ride I have planned is available, it's going to be a lot of climbing. Nothing incredibly steep, but more than I've completed in a single ride before by a factor of about 2x ... and that was 8 years ago. Wow, as I'm typing this out I'm realizing I might have bit off a little too much. I have been training and riding more this year so far, so maybe I'll be ok. Worst case scenario is I bonk, turn around and coast back down to the car and learn my lesson for next year.

Apr 29, 21 4:59 pm  · 
 · 

Update: Change of plans. Didn't do the ride I was thinking of, and they're opening the road to cars this week. Maybe next year.

May 5, 21 12:30 pm  · 
 · 

Def looking forward to getting back into riding again, now that I am nearing end of my 9 months of PT. Been doing a few minutes on bike as part of my warmup (and started my "Return to Run") but with weather warming up it will be nice to get back out for some longer rides.

One thing I'd be open to advice/thoughts on is integrating my now 16 month old into my love of bikes/riding. Should I start with handlebar/frame mounted seat or Chariot/pull behind? Obvs one is cheaper but I was gifted an older model of the later.

Don't ride anything fancy currently. Just a Marin commuter(ish) that I've had for years. Not sure why, something about their geometry/history I think, but always had wanted one.

Bianchi were always a brand I lusted after though now (see above) I probably prefer a dutch/cargo e-bike.


May 7, 21 12:00 am  · 
1  · 

I used the style of seat that is positioned between the saddle and the handlebars when my kids were little. It felt much safer having them between my arms while riding, and I think it's more enjoyable for them in that position. My 11-year old son is now an MTB fanatic, so maybe this is what sparked his love for it.

May 7, 21 12:19 pm  · 
1  · 

I preferred the pull behind trailer when my daughter was little. I felt she was safer there where if I fell over for some reason the trailer was still grounded, or at least she was closer to the ground and might not suffer serious injuries. She quickly outgrew it height-wise, and now we have her on the back of the bike in a seat attached to the bike's rack. I actually prefer her there compared to the trailer, TBH. I can interact more with her on the ride and she can get my attention easier. Plus I'm not worried about the extra length and width of the trailer.

May 7, 21 12:45 pm  · 
1  · 

I used a trailer when taking both the kids. It could also carry a bunch of stuff. Great for beach rides/outings. It was too wide and sketchy for LA streets though. Didn't feel good to have the kids in their trailer sticking further into the street than I was.

May 7, 21 1:04 pm  · 
2  · 

I wish we took cycling infrastructure more seriously in The States. I'm not sure where your comfort level is Paul, but I'm assuming if there were dedicated, protected bike lanes that connected to an overall grid/network of cycling lanes through the city it would be a different story.

I was fairly limited to our neighborhood's quiet streets and multi-use pathways with the trailer. I did feel like people gave me a little more space with the trailer, but it was always a little nerve-racking.

May 7, 21 2:12 pm  · 
1  · 

Totally. LA has a lot of "bike lanes" but they are often half-assed, and a lot of drivers in this city don't respect bike lanes or cyclists. The key word in your comment is "protected" bike lanes. I don't tend to shy away from dangerous activities, but I honestly think riding a bike in LA is one of the riskiest things you can do here. The ghost bike memorials all over the city are a constant reminder.

May 7, 21 2:23 pm  · 
2  · 

"Protected" might also need some caveats. This is not "protected" ...

May 7, 21 3:25 pm  · 
2  · 

And there's this classic showing the bike lane situation in NYC...

May 7, 21 3:42 pm  · 
4  · 
Bench

^ ^ This is my everyday nightmare Paul ...

May 7, 21 4:35 pm  · 
1  · 
SneakyPete

Casey deserves an award.

May 7, 21 4:49 pm  · 
1  · 
square.

this is an amazing form of performance art/protest.

Aug 20, 21 12:29 pm  · 
 · 

My new ride, as of my 54th birthday last month.


May 7, 21 1:31 pm  · 
8  · 
Bench

You got a patch on the back of that leather jacket Donna ?

May 7, 21 4:35 pm  · 
3  · 
Non Sequitur

where's the firechicken decal? back of helmet hopefully.

May 7, 21 4:39 pm  · 
2  · 

For anyone looking to be a "dot watcher" ... the Race Across the West (RAW) is starting in minutes with the Race Across America (RAAM) starting after that. 

http://trackleaders.com/raam21

Also, the Trans Am Bike Race (TABR) is underway with the leader on what looks like it might be a record-setting pace.

http://trackleaders.com/transa...

Jun 15, 21 3:01 pm  · 
 · 
archanonymous

CROSS IS COMING!!!!!



Aug 2, 21 7:03 pm  · 
2  · 

I like watching the grand tours and spotting the famous or more modern architecture. The Vuelta went through Valencia today and they were showing a lot of the City of Arts and Sciences. Calatrava and Candela fans would be happy. 

I do feel like you see more in the Vuelta than in the TdF or Giro. TdF almost always focuses on the historical churches, chateaux, etc. I've heard, though I don't know if it's actually true, that they pick routes to avoid areas that are more modernized to portray a more quaint, historical, and provincial France. It makes it almost jarring when you catch a glimpse of a McDonalds in the background of a camera shot. I do recall a number of years ago they had some helicopter shots of Corb's Notre Dame du Haut when the route passed nearby. 

Aug 19, 21 7:27 pm  · 
1  · 
luvu

TDF tv coverage has evolved over the last 40 years or so / the other grand tours , especially the Giro has been improving a lot. Yeah , La Veulta last stage through Valencia was beautiful ..have you spotted half built Valencia soccer stadium ?

Aug 20, 21 12:55 am  · 
 · 
Bench

Interesting - I'm currently watching the Vuelta and felt like today's stage is notably dearth of much interest. Its incredibly dry/arid looking without much in the background. Whereas the Tour being in mid-July and at a more temperate climate means the background landscape is much more interesting.

I imagine the focus on a "quaint" France (if thats true) is largely trying to cater to an American audience, where those kinds of historical sites and landscapes would be exotic/foreign images.

Aug 20, 21 10:23 am  · 
 · 

TdF viewership numbers for the US are not really all that great. While growing it's just shy of 400,000 viewers these last years.

Compare that to numbers in the millions for other European countries and for France itself ... I doubt the French organizers are trying to cater to an American audience at all.

https://advanced-television.co...

https://www.sportspromedia.com...

Aug 20, 21 11:41 am  · 
 · 
Bench

But doesnt NBC hold the main/largest broadcast contracts since the Lance days? Seems like that would be the big money maker ... ?

Aug 20, 21 11:50 am  · 
 · 
randomised

In the Netherlands a talkshow where they simply discuss the Tour has half a million viewers...

Aug 20, 21 11:54 am  · 
1  · 

NBC does hold the current US broadcast rights contract for the TdF (reportedly valued at $8 million per year) until 2023, but they don't control the race route, or the video footage. ASO the race organizers do and they'll do whatever they want even if NBC's $8 million wants something different to cater to their 400,000 Americans.

I was trying to find a list of the broadcast deals ASO has in place but couldn't quickly find anything. I was seeing that back in 2013 (a year after NBC and ASO completed the current contract) ASO renewed their deal with France TV through 2020 reportedly worth at least €20 million per year. That's like over 3x the value of the US/NBC contract. One of the links I posted earlier above indicated that France TV pulled in over 40 million viewers for the 2020 race so a MUCH larger audience too. 

I couldn't find what the Eurosport contract for the majority of the European broadcast rights is valued at.

Aug 20, 21 1:05 pm  · 
 · 
archanonymous

I liked that 5 minute long shot of the buzzards on stage 9.

Aug 23, 21 11:35 am  · 
 · 

So many views of the Mezquita-Catedral de Cordoba from today's stage.

I was thinking about this the other day and it seems like in Spain they are more likely to have the route go straight through a major city, but in France they usually hit just the outskirts (that or I might be suffering from a selective memory or greater familiarity with cities in Spain compared to France). The obvious exception is Paris as the last stage in the TdF. I'm assuming there is a difference in the local government's willingness to shut down main roads or areas of the cities for the race. Anyone else notice this, or is it just me and my imagination?

Aug 26, 21 6:27 pm  · 
 · 
ivanmillya

I'm in the process of selling my car (trying to pay off student debt and saving for a down payment on a condo), so I'll be buying a bike. Never bought or learned to ride a bicycle before, but I live real close to where I work (I could feasibly walk). Anything in particular I should look out for?

Aug 24, 21 4:26 pm  · 
1  · 
sameolddoctor

Be sure to visit a bike shop and talk to them. Most bike shop employees are super knowledgeable and helpful. And dont spend too much money on your first bike.

Aug 24, 21 7:04 pm  · 
2  · 
randomised

Don’t let them trick you in getting training wheels on your bike though, if you can’t keep your balance you’re not ready to ride.

Aug 25, 21 5:37 am  · 
3  · 
ivanmillya

I have tried a couple times to ride a bike and found that I can (probably) keep my balance well enough to do the two minute bike to work. At worst I can walk, and practice riding after hours. What would be a good amount to spend on a first bike?

Aug 25, 21 7:22 am  · 
 · 
go do it

try a bike co-op or creig's list and look for an old beater bike or a rat bike we used to call them.

i had a single speed rat bike that i would paint a different color every week it seems and didn't care if i crashed it.

ah yea good times bro


Aug 24, 21 9:07 pm  · 
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