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Tragedy and Irony

Broadstreetexpresstrain

A New York architect has been tragically killed by falling debris from a building in midtown manhattan.....I have often been concerned about this issue for aging high rises in New York, Chicago, Philadelphia and Boston. The older high rises often have stone and metal cornices that cantilever out over the sidewalks below by 2 or more feet. The stone and metal cornices are usually held in place by metal cramp anchors and or metal framing that may be  corroded from age and water infiltration.

These all should be inspected as many of these structures are now 100 or more years old. The irony here is that architects are often involved in the demolition of buildings and in this instance, a poorly maintained building has demolished/ killed a person, who so happened to be an Architect of all people. 

More should be done to prevent this kind of tragedy from happening again.

 
Dec 18, 19 7:03 pm
citizen

Tragedy and coincidence.

Dec 18, 19 8:17 pm  · 
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citizen

Sorry, it is most definitely tragic, no matter the victim's profession.

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Dank Gehry

there is already a requirement for buildings more than 6 stories to be inspected because of this reason. look up Local Law 11 /  "FISP" 

Dec 19, 19 5:29 am  · 
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poop876

True. There are companies out there that just do that, inspect buildings like you mentioned. I had a client ask me if we could do it, but I wouldn't' even know where to begin and liability would be huge.

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Chad Miller

Also some of those building are really tall ::eep!::

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Chad, that's what the drones are for: https://archinect.com/news/article/150146687/should-drones-perform-building-inspections

At least until they start falling as well.

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Chad Miller

I've never done a hi-rise building inspection. Do you think a drone would provide enough information to do a proper facade inspection?

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My comment was mostly facetious. The replies on the article I linked are fairly strait forward in why it wouldn’t be the greatest idea in practice.

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mightyaa

Just FYI; A drone with a FLIR camera can identify potential leaks; which would be where you'll most likely find rot. With a good camera, you can also look for telltale signs of leaks or poor maintenance like you'd do visually. Another is you can set up a flight path so you can document the whole facade and photograph for later review. So basically drones can be useful in identifying areas you might want to investigate closer. I have wondered if it's stable enough to 3d lidar scan. What it can't do is intrusive investigations or testing or spot small fractures. Good tool for pre-inspection though to scope the visual/intrusive inspection areas.

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eeayeeayo

NYC's inspection requirements aren't just visual - they include probes of cavity walls at each site of visual inspection. Are there drones that can conduct that testing? Maybe eventually, but current law requires inspections to be done in person from scaffolding, in straight vertical paths from street to roof.

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Chad Miller

Interesting eeayeeayo.

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A $1,250 fine on a property worth 10’s of millions (or more) is not a deterrent, it is a joke. Multiply the fines by 1,000, asses them per day, and condemn the building if protections are not erected immediately.

The cheap asshole rentiers will skate on this. After years of legal wrangling the insurer will make a payout to the deceased's family.

The Code of Hammurabi comes to mind. Also known as "an eye for ab eye".

Dec 19, 19 12:24 pm  · 
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