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Architect Stamp Options

AlexanderLay

Does anyone know any good websites that offer something more unique than a standard wood handled rubber architect stamp?  I just got my license and would like to have something that looks cool for my desk.

 
Jan 18, 18 6:06 pm

1 Featured Comment

All 20 Comments

chigurh

I recommend a standard wood handled stamp so you don't look like a complete self important ninny.  Congrats on the license.  My wood handled stamps live in a zip lock baggie in my trunk.  

Jan 18, 18 6:19 pm
citizen

You say that like 'self-important ninny' is a bad thing.

SneakyPete

3D Print a handle. It's fun.

Jan 18, 18 6:39 pm

I think a stamp with unicorns would be cool.


Jan 18, 18 7:47 pm

I think I have seen them at Michaels.

chigurh

that's funny

Mount it on a large mallet. Something big enough to crush a table. Carry it around like Thor's hammer.

Jan 18, 18 9:50 pm
McTaco

get a self inking stamp if you actually plan on using it! 

Jan 18, 18 10:26 pm
chigurh

yup

Non Sequitur

Beer tap handle.

Jan 18, 18 10:28 pm
RickB-Astoria

EMBOSSER !!!! (NOTE: Check is the state regulations on acceptable methods of affixing your architect seal. This varies state by state.)

Jan 18, 18 11:36 pm
arch76

my expired stamp has a bear and possibly a star on it. its self inking.

Jan 19, 18 12:44 am
RickB-Astoria

Plan to renew it?

arch76

dunno...kinda like the thrill of practicing bareback...

accesskb

Get one that stamps in gold hot foil

Jan 19, 18 2:10 am
RickB-Astoria

Embossers....

Non Sequitur
Our office’s stamps are kept in a random drawer near the photocopier and in a large ziplock bag. Last time I saw someone physically stamping drawings was about 7 years ago.

Are physical stamps still required? Only my M & E p.engs still refuse digital stamps.
Jan 19, 18 8:02 am
Bench

Really? My co-op in 2014 we were still physically stamping some drawings, I actually billed about an hour doing all the manual work of stamping on a set of CD's so that the partner could sign each of them.

Non Sequitur

Ben, where was this? (state/province) I do remember stamping a 40-page set of drawings a while back and then the boss signed all of them. damn tedious.

Bloopox

My rubber stamps are all in a big ziplock bag in a file drawer somewhere too.  I last used one in 2012 when an old codger small town zoning guy insisted on a wet stamp.  I have an embosser from the first state in which I got licensed, but most places don't let us submit embossed originals anymore because they jam up their scanners and an embossed seal doesn't show up in the scans anyway. 

I still emboss the first page of my books when I buy them, for old time's sake.

Jan 19, 18 9:28 am
RickB-Astoria

That should teach them for trying to make more copies including a digital copy without permission so they can somehow later reproduce them for the builders. (Joking!)

Bloopox

Most jurisdictions scan everything these days to satisfy public record and document retention policies. Some don't even keep paper copies anymore - they dispose of them a year after the CO is issued. Besides embossing, a lot of other things we used to do up through the 1980s or early 90s would get the sheets rejected now because they don't feed through an OCE well - like using sticky-back, white-out, shading the backs of mylars with colored tape, pin registrations, even stapling typed specs to drawing sheets!

RickB-Astoria

Maybe they ought to get themselves a flat bed scanner for such large format printing. There should be some kind of setting where you can set on these scanner for type of paper, just choose one that is slightly thicker like photopaper or something so it can adjust to different paper thickness. The other trick is use a high resolution camera on a properly spaced distance to photo snapshot a 24 x 36 sheet. Table that is 38" x 42" and camera that is spaced at about the right distance and a lighting system to make sure the sheet is appropriate light in full spectrum light. Modern super-high resolution cameras should be able to produce a suitable copy of the sheet for those purposes. Oh wait, I'm assuming they have a brain.... NEVERMIND !!!!

Bloopox

They scan tens of thousands of pages at a time with a document feeder - stack them up in a special box-like thing, shake them on a vibrating table to get them all perfectly aligned, and leave them to run. Think about all the drawing sheets a large city gets in a year - easily tens of thousands per day, millions per year - it's not like they can have a guy putting things sheet by sheet on a flat bed, or taking photos of it. All the drawings have to be flat, unbound, no attachments, uniform thickness. Embossers are pretty much a thing of the past on anything but tiny projects in tertiary locations.

RickB-Astoria

Reasonable point. You seemed to miss that I was joking in the first post. I'll say I was being kind of sarcastic a little my previous reply. Cities have all kinds of options for records retention. I can't elaborate on how long they have to be retained because it varies but state laws usually spells out minimum retention and sometimes maximums.

RickB-Astoria

I could be a dick to the city and give them it good ol' fashion diazo or worse.... or carved onto basalt slabs. In a way of joking and humor in the building code class, I joking said, "What if submit it to you on stone slabs?" The B.O. joking said, "He'll break it across our heads". Figure, if he's going to lift up that heavy ass slab, he's going to break it over the head of the a--hole who submits it in stone slab work. 

As far as embossers and the scanners, some scanners should be able to handle multiple thicknesses of paper and have some measures of protecting itself from jamming and the emboss shouldn't be enough to completely jam up the scanner. I do suspect that goal leaf foil MIGHT screw up the scanner but simple embossing shouldn't. Ad long as the paper isn't tissue wad but a light tracing bond but not quite vellum/bum wad light, it should feed through as most scanners can take up to standards bond if not a little heavier stock. Those high speed machines tends to jam up more easily but that might be a an issue of the machine's reliability at high speed scanning.


Bloopox

I didn't miss that you were joking - I was responding to your general enthusiasm in this thread about recommending embossers.  It's not really an issue of what should or might or could go through the machines. The people who take in the drawings just follow the policy, which typically says no embossing, no tape, no attachments, no pin holes, and so on and so forth. They're not going to argue with you about the settings of their scanner - they just reject your drawings.  It's beside the point for a lot of cities now anyway, because they don't intake any paper drawings in the first place - they require everything to come digitally from the architect or print house. Now I suppose that if you were so attached to the idea of embossing that you wanted to print out a set, emboss it, give it back to the print house, let them scan it, and send it to the city, you could do that - but you'd have to emboss over a digital or ink stamp anyway for the seal to still be visible once it's scanned. You wouldn't be getting anything out of that other than an extra large bill from the print house and a waste of time.

RickB-Astoria

How does all that digital submission protect me from infinite unlimited duration liability for every single time the a--hole in the city gives away digital copies of the construction documents to other people? I don't mind the city making it available to view (not printed). Digital copies of digital content are 100% perfect copies and would be impossible to distinguish between an authentic original and a counterfeit.

Bloopox

How is that different from any time that you upload the set to a plan room during bidding (which is nearly always a requirement on any public or large-entity-client project)? Anybody who pays for it gets the construction set. On a large project the number of people who get the original set is typically in the hundreds, if not thousands (every GC and sub who is considering bidding, every potential supplier of every GC and sub, suppliers who are not named in the specs but want to request substitution, every potential fabricator of each manufacturer...) Having the construction set does not grant use of the drawings to build anything other than the project for which they were intended. If somebody who purchases the drawings - whether from a plan room or a city - goes out and uses them to build something else, the architect has zero liability for that.

RickB-Astoria

The old fashion days was architects/designers make the diazo copies and distribute accordingly. (Before diazo, cyanotype sets)

People tend to think because they have a copy with the stamp/seal on it, they have the right to use it. If something happens in the project, we get sued.

RickB-Astoria

Yes, we get sued, it doesn't have to be the copyright violator but the person who purchased or buys the place in a year or two later. The builder will say, it's built according to the architect/designer's plans. Therefore, we get sued. We have to go through the expense of legally defending ourselves. Not only would I never get a dime for my time, I'd be out hundred(s) if not thousands of dollars even if I successfully defended myself and not be held liable.

RickB-Astoria

POINT: If we have to defend ourselves through court, we are losing money because it costs money to defend yourself not just the court costs but loses in 'sales'. 

When you are a sole-practitioner, you don't have other people to keep the business operating and work in when you are in a court room for days if not weeks for some slow drawn out process... and in some cases, this stuff takes months. Who's going to get the work done for other projects for other clients when you're still in the damn courthouse all day multiple times a week for months. Who? Who's going to meet with the prospective clients to discuss their projects and bring in the more work the upcoming months. Who's going to answer the phone or respond to the client's questions when you're time is caught up. 

All that revenue loss is something you aren't going to get compensated for because it wasn't already happened and definite. Courts don't award hypothetical costs only exact dollar losses you spent not lost sales because prospective clients moved onto other professionals because they couldn't meet with you. In other words, you're finances are impacted and the courts won't reward you for anymore than the cost of the court and any legal costs for having a lawyer. Lawyers don't do this for pro bono. 

It is why I try to make sure I control the distribution of plans and the quantity of sets produced. Maybe on large scale projects, the contractors are more professional than the typical numb skulls that works on smaller projects like residential.

Bloopox

Do you have any actual examples of court cases involving an architect or design professional being sued for problems resulting from someone building from a set of plans that was not intended for that project? I've never seen any court case or engineering board decision having anything to do with such a situation. I can see how something like this might conceivably happen if an architect were to sell stock plans - then the architect could reasonably be named as a party to a case in which some issue resulted from using those plans.   But I don't see how an architect would be accepted by a court as a party to any case in which a builder or anybody else purchases plans from a city and then used them for a different project than the one for which they were intended and permitted.  That would be illegal act on the part of the purchaser and builder - but the architect would have no liability whatsoever. I've been to court as an expert witness on several cases, and while lawyers sometimes do try to name everybody they can possibly throw into the mix as a party to a case, the bogus ones are always rejected by the court long before anybody actually makes it to a courtroom.

In any case, many jurisdictions have gone completely digital for drawing intake - that's just the way it is. If you feel there's an unacceptable liability cooperating with the requirements then I suppose you just wouldn't take on a project anyplace where you'd need to submit that way.

RickB-Astoria

Anyone can be sued. All that is required is a person filing a lawsuit against you. Does that mean that they win the case? No. What does it mean for you winning? Out a bunch of money and time because you get rewarded nothing for defending yourself and winning. What is the identifiable difference between a stock building plan you send digitally and the one in the hands of the building department that was copied? The one suing might not be the violator but the person who buys the building/house and found flaws and names you in the lawsuit. 

Keep in mind that the party suing may not be the builder or whoever that illegally reusing the plans on other sites but a purchaser of the house or building. If it was the violator, that person isn't going to say that he or she took the plans from the building department and is violating your copyright and illegally reusing the plans. They will paint a story. When your name and stamp is on every sheet of the plan, they aren't going to immediately identify the issue is bogus. You mentioned stock plans. That is conceivable but a purchaser of a stock plan is only licensed for an X number of times being used. 

For non-developers, it would be 1x times for a specific site and that would be spelled out in contracts. What happens when copies of the digital copy sent to the building department are used somewhere else by some other person. You become potentially liable. The problem is, the person suing isn't necessarily the person who violated your copyright. Say... a sleezy builder took a copy of the file from the city and is then using it on another project site near by and something is wrong and you are brought into the case because your name, stamp/seal is all over it. Wet signature possibly forged but the building department won't necessarily notice that because they don't know your signature well enough. Something is wrong and then the buyer of the house sues you. This is what I am getting at. It won't be immediately apparent that the house they bought were made from counterfeit building plans. It might not be until you are dragged in to defend yourself in the courtroom.

The city needs to not reproduce the digital file in any way or form. Limit people to only viewing the plans from the city's computers NOT print or copy the files. If the plans are reproduced digitally, it can become harder to detect. For example, I can face those issues as a building designer with my name and business name on the plans. ORS 12.135. If my plans are illegally used, I face liability exposure. Therefore, there needs to be means of authentication legitimate copies from counterfeit copies.

RickB-Astoria

As far as legal cases, I don't have access to court docket cases. They don't have that stuff available for free... you know expensive subscription services.

Bloopox

I believe you're worrying about something that so rarely (if ever) happens that it is an insignificant risk. It's certainly your call as to whether you judge that to be enough of a risk that you choose to limit your practice to only those projects for which it's possible to submit embossed original drawings and not submit digital files. You'd just need to make sure before you sign any contract for design services, or respond to any RFPs or RFQs, that the project is not located in a jurisdiction that requires digital submission for permitting, and that your clients, their representatives, CMs, etc. do not require it for bidding.

RickB-Astoria

Here's what I say to 'em, don't reproduce the files. VIEWABLE ONLY. Public records request does not require copying the content. They just have to provide in a fashion where they can not download the copy and reproduce digitally or in print except for staff members who needs to make copies for official purposes. The public in general does not need to reproduced copies. If they need a copy for research purposes, they can contact me and I would provide them a copy with a note on it indicating "this copy is for academic research only and may not be submitted for permit process and shall be automatically denied by the building department if anyone attempts to submit this copy or any copy made from this copy." Any copies to client, contractor and other parties would be delivered by me to them, they just have to order the explicit number of copies and that is what they receive.

Bloopox

Good luck with that. Always limit your practice to small projects for private clients, in very small places, in states without laws that require permit drawings to be available publicly (as is the case with several states' QBDS protocols) and that might work out fine.

Steeplechase

Who knew that it is so crazy and difficult to put the project address on the titleblock.

jla-x

"If they need a copy for research purposes" like if they are researching big foot or something?

My favorite is when Balkins complained about potential loss of revenue because you’re tied up in court defending yourself. I wonder how much loss of revenue you’d see if you have to spend all day trying to get them to intake your drawings for permit when you don’t follow their rules?

RickB-Astoria

First off, a lot of the cities do in fact still accept submissions of plans on paper. While they encourage submission digitally and want the encourage the bulk of plans submitted digitally... especially very large commercial projects.

Bloopox

Some cities still do, but some don't accept paper plans at all anymore. They've cut budgets by cutting staff who handled those in-person transactions and processed and stored those drawings. Most likely more cities will follow in that direction. 

If the drawings are for public projects or even partially publicly-funded projects it's beside the point in some states anyway, regardless of the size of the project, and regardless of whether the town or city where it's located would otherwise accept paper drawings, because the quality-based design process regulations require digital submission. Different states have different rules and thresholds for QBD - in some the construction budget would have to exceed 500k, while in others it's only 10k, so even something like bathroom renovations to the town library or renovating a community room in a state college dorm kicks the project into the QBD queue, and then paper submissions are out of the question.

RickB-Astoria

I'll probably submit digitally if I absolutely have to but I would talk with the people involved about policies and procedures and how they will keep the pdf from being copied and given to other parties because even if I digitally signed it, that digital signature is perfectly duplicated any time the pdf is duplicated. FOIA doesn't explicitly require the city to duplicate the pdf but it can be set up so it is viewable ONLY. I can care less if the city makes copies for the fire chief/fire marshal to review, the engineering department reviewed, etc. That is not the problem.

Steeplechase

A city isn’t going to set up document streaming because of your irrational fears and inability to include basic information like an address.

Bloopox

I posed this question to my insurance rep today. He said: If one of their policy holders were to be named in a suit for a project on which they were never involved, the insurance company's attorney would send a letter to the court demanding that proof of a contract be produced. That sort of legal assistance is part of what my insurance pays for. If the court did not receive proof of a contract, or other evidence of my involvement with the project, such as correspondence from me regarding that project, then the court would dismiss me from the case - almost certainly long before it made it to a courtroom, and with little further involvement from me other than a notarized statement that I was never involved in the project and did not authorize use of my work.  He seemed a little amused at the possibility of such as case.  I'd still like to know where this has ever happened.

RickB-Astoria

I like your insurance company. Thanks for the info. As a building designer, this might not be so simple because they may claim the agreement was done verbal and there was no recording devices. Now, we both know it would be stupid but it is something that can muddy things up but a written and signed contract isn't required per se which I believe would be something that should be required even with projects not involving licensed architects. My business policy would have a written & signed contract and an extra measure employed for authentication. The contract wouldn't be part of the permit set submitted.

RickB-Astoria

"A city isn’t going to set up document streaming because of your irrational fears and inability to include basic information like an address." - Stock Building Plans???? On a custom / one-off project, it would have the street address of the project.

Steeplechase

If one can’t provide proof of an agreement then one does not have standing, which means the suit gets dismissed
. Stock plans can still have an date and address placed on them for each time they are utilized.

5839

Rick I think you'd have other more plausible things to worry about if you're selling stock plans that are stamped and signed. That seems like an irresponsible thing to do in the first place. What happens if someone buys a stock plan from you for a 1600 square foot house, with your stamp and signature on it but no project address, and then submits those plans for a permit in New York, where that project requires an architect? Then you're going to get fined for practicing architecture without a license. That seems like a more likely scenario than one where you sell the plan to someone who builds an authorized project with it, without ever putting an address on it, and then somebody at the city sells that same plan to someone else who builds an unauthorized project, over which some lawsuit ensues, in which you are named as a defendant...

RickB-Astoria

5839, that is absolutely plausible good point. I did bring this up because it is a rare kind of case that might be unprecedented but could happen. I agree, it would outright stupid to send out plans, even stock building plans, without a project address for which the plans are authorized for use. I see the New York case. Simply put, I want to be sure how we cover our rear ends so we don't get in a f---ed up situation.

RickB-Astoria

Steeplechase, how do you prove an agreement that is verbal? Oregon technically accepts verbal agreements. If my name or even business name is on the plans, they would use that in their argument of an agreement and that the plans are a deliverable. In a stock building plan set up, there might not be the typical contract for design services. I would think anyone smart with stock building plans would have some mechanism of recording purchases and the appropriate transactions that are carried out.

Bloopox

The burden of proof is on the plaintive. The point that the insurance rep was making is that THEY have to come up with something that shows your involvement or express authorization.  It's not enough that your name or business name is on the plans - they have to prove that you had intentional involvement with that project. You keep saying anybody can name anyone in a lawsuit - that's true, but any lawyer can file a motion to dismiss, based on lack of evidence (you can even file that on your own behalf, without an attorney, though I wouldn't recommend that) and it's the plaintive who has to cough up the evidence, or that motion will be successful.  Let's say this theoretical enterprising person at the city resells your plans from project X to person Y, and person Y builds a copy of that house, unbeknownst to you. Something goes wrong, person Y sues you, and claims there was a verbal contract. Your lawyer is going to write a motion to dismiss. Now even if there was a verbal contract, person Y has to be able to come up with proof:  some proof might be that payment to you for your services cleared your account, right? Or perhaps emails from you, discussing the project? Or phone bills showing their calls to your number during the project's progress? If they can't produce any of those, then too bad so sad for them.  It's not enough that they claim that there was a verbal contract, they always talked to you in person, and they paid you in cash, and got no receipts. If they can't come up with something to substantiate the existence of a contract then they haven't satisfied their burden of proof.

Steeplechase

Blooper pretty much covered it. Just because there is a verbal agreement does not mean there would not be some sort of recorded outcome. You're worried about potentially getting roped in with someone who is willing to commit 1) theft by stealing your plans, 2) fraud by submitted them to a local AHJ or even contractor as valid and legally obtained and 3) perjury by lying to the court about these circumstances. Even if someone else is selling your plans, the victim is not going to be irrationally attached to you and convince the court to follow along, the focus would quickly shift to the reseller.

RickB-Astoria

"The burden of proof is on the plaintive. The point that the insurance rep was making is that THEY have to come up with something that shows your involvement or express authorization. It's not enough that your name or business name is on the plans - they have to prove that you had intentional involvement with that project. You keep saying anybody can name anyone in a lawsuit - that's true, but any lawyer can file a motion to dismiss, based on lack of evidence (you can even file that on your own behalf, without an attorney, though I wouldn't recommend that) and it's the plaintive who has to cough up the evidence, or that motion will be successful. Let's say this theoretical enterprising person at the city resells your plans from project X to person Y, and person Y builds a copy of that house, unbeknownst to you. Something goes wrong, person Y sues you, and claims there was a verbal contract. Your lawyer is going to write a motion to dismiss. Now even if there was a verbal contract, person Y has to be able to come up with proof: some proof might be that payment to you for your services cleared your account, right? Or perhaps emails from you, discussing the project? Or phone bills showing their calls to your number during the project's progress? If they can't produce any of those, then too bad so sad for them. It's not enough that they claim that there was a verbal contract, they always talked to you in person, and they paid you in cash, and got no receipts. If they can't come up with something to substantiate the existence of a contract then they haven't satisfied their burden of proof." 

Given that civil courts are a little difference to criminal court case, the "burden of proof" is not a thing in civil case like it maybe in a criminal case but they will have the burden of substantiating their argument and they usually are the one to substantiate or form a compelling argument to shift the burden. Civil courts is about who has the stronger argument. Civil court and burden of proof can be like a pong game.

RickB-Astoria

Blooper pretty much covered it. Just because there is a verbal agreement does not mean there would not be some sort of recorded outcome. You're worried about potentially getting roped in with someone who is willing to commit 1) theft by stealing your plans, 2) fraud by submitted them to a local AHJ or even contractor as valid and legally obtained and 3) perjury by lying to the court about these circumstances. Even if someone else is selling your plans, the victim is not going to be irrationally attached to you and convince the court to follow along, the focus would quickly shift to the reseller.

Lawsuits is about going after the money. They want to go after us for money, if we have more money to collect from.

Victim and rationality might not go together. I don't think anyone wants to get roped into a shit situation for some b.s. I agree with you that it is likely they'll shift to the "reseller".


RickB-Astoria

Bloopox, thanks for the information from the insurance agent. It is an unusual scenario that probably doesn't happen often but you know.... people come up with new ways to con especially in this age of technology including clever spoofing.

RickB-Astoria

Since you both probably know me enough to be anal retentive and have some kind of communications records of some level in some form, I would be able to blow them out of the water (especially with an attorney). If the party suing has no communications records to support their claim, it would be clear and apparent before too long. With physical plans, I probably identify that their plans are invalid due to measures I employ. On digital copies, it is harder to authenticate a duplicate of my digital plans from an original but there would be means at my disposal to have such cases dismissed from court. I could even distribute plans to my client on an SD card or something with associated copy of the terms of use agreement and so forth with the company seal, invoice record, and so forth. These would be a procedural evidence that I could call forth with stock building plans that can be used as supporting evidence. If they can't furnish it, they don't have an authentic copy of the plans.



Steeplechase

A law suit requires standing. Just because someone can file a suit for anything does not mean it will actually go anywhere. If you have no evidence of a relationship with another party then you have no standing. Digital signing does not just mean using an image of a person's signature. Certificate-based digital signatures provide authentication because they do not allow for a file to edited. Using an SD card to distribute plans sounds like a horrible idea. You should use something that creates a record.

RickB-Astoria

We aren't talking editing files. We are talking about copying files. If I use, say the certificate based digital signatures, that's fine and dandy. Here's the thing, the plans may have a alpha-numeric or a barcode or similar system affixed. The code is not the electronic signature itself but a reference to an in-house database of mine. The medium in which it is delivered is kind of irrelevant.

Almosthip7

I have all the engineers stamps from my firm, past to present, on my computer.

I prefer this to having my own stamp.

Jan 19, 18 10:53 am
Featured Comment
SpontaneousCombustion

Whether or not you need a physical stamp might depend on what type of work you're doing.  One of the states where I work still has in their statutes that drawings need to be wet-stamped and signed - with a rubber stamp, embossers aren't allowed there.  But if you go through decades of old board minutes you can find where first they decided about 20 years ago that only the signature had to be ink, but digital stamps are ok - and then about 10 years ago they decided that both digital stamp and signature are ok.  Since those decisions are in the minutes but haven't made it back into the statute, almost all officials know that a digital stamp/signature is ok, but some tiny-town officials don't and will still insist on ink.  So if you're working on single-family residential or tiny projects in tiny towns, you might still need an actual rubber stamp there.  But if your firm is doing larger projects then most of the cities have their whole submission process online anyway, and your drawings are getting uploaded by your print house directly to the city and code officials, and to plan rooms for bidding - so it really makes no difference whether there's an inked original somewhere in your flat files, or whether you digitally stamp/sign everything, because all the official, filed "originals" are digital files.  I spent the $14 for the simplest rubber stamp, and put it in a drawer just in case.  If you need something to decorate your desk, how about a nice plant, or the red swingline?

Jan 19, 18 11:50 am
RickB-Astoria

I have to joke from time to time when I hear "wet stamp". Ugh.... yeah... so is the stamp when it is printed with an inkjet printer. It's wet until it dries. I'll have them a "wet stamp" right on their forehead.

RickB-Astoria

Anyway, interesting points there and the above reply isn't really directed at you but more commentary about the "wet stamp".

mantaray
I've had my stamp for years and I've never yet gotten to use it :-( love the idea of stamping my architectural book library fly leafs! Think my state board would come after my for that??
Jan 19, 18 12:34 pm
wynne1architect@gmail.com

I like the retro-feel of my wet stamp wood handle. I have it in a drawer for safe keeping, it is a connection to the legacy of Sir Christopher Wren, and FLW.

Jan 19, 18 6:36 pm
shellarchitect

Self inking is pretty cool, but I've only stamped books

Jan 22, 18 12:21 pm
Le Courvoisier

I have one of the Arrow self-inking stamps. Doesn't look pretty cool on a desk. Count me as part of the "Only have stamped books with it" club.

Jan 22, 18 5:44 pm
StephenW

I had to buy a rubber stamp because my state requests a print from everybody's stamp to keep on file. That's the only thing I've used it for. I think it's in a shoe box in my laundry room at home. I don't like to keep junk on my desk. 

Jan 23, 18 11:14 am
BulgarBlogger

Still curious- what do foreign ones look like? Any examples?

Jan 23, 18 11:48 am
wynne1architect@gmail.com

Good fences make good neighbors

Jan 23, 18 8:38 pm

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