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Emily Oechslin

Emily Oechslin

Lexington, KY, US

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 The combination of the three cubes. The cubes are larger than the orginial, but the initial designs behind the areas remained the same.
The combination of the three cubes. The cubes are larger than the orginial, but the initial designs behind the areas remained the same.
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Light and Shadows

Fall 2007

Studio with Rokshana Kahn

The focus of the semester was the exploration of light and shadows, and how both worked together to discover a purpose for a space.  Cubes were designed to give the area a set boundary, but by adding or taking away from the cube’s solid walls space began to emerge.  Six individual cubes were made to test different techniques freeing up space.  From there the assignment was directed towards the creation of spaces for a painter, poet, and musician.  Each room was to embody the person within, and in the end the three cubes had to connect in a smooth transition.  The goal of establishing a room through addition or subtraction contributed to setting the mood.

 
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Status: School Project
Location: Lexington, KY, US

 
All six cube designs showing the process throughout the semester towards ones that embodied a space for a poet, painter, and musician.
All six cube designs showing the process throughout the semester towards ones that embodied a space for a poet, painter, and musician.
The inside of the musician’s cube. The exterior cuts displayed a musical quality that allowed enough light for instruments to be played and for sound to bound back.
The inside of the musician’s cube. The exterior cuts displayed a musical quality that allowed enough light for instruments to be played and for sound to bound back.
The inside of the poet’s cube. The unique shapes cut into the ceiling gave pockets of spaces where there was light and darkness, which depended on the poet’s attitude he wanted to take in his poetry at the time. The light and shadows produced were always changing, which could inspire.
The inside of the poet’s cube. The unique shapes cut into the ceiling gave pockets of spaces where there was light and darkness, which depended on the poet’s attitude he wanted to take in his poetry at the time. The light and shadows produced were always changing, which could inspire.
The inside of the painter’s cube. The ceiling contained spotlights that the painter could place objects under to paint. The walls had shapes cut into them large enough to allow light in and for the painter to look out on the world.
The inside of the painter’s cube. The ceiling contained spotlights that the painter could place objects under to paint. The walls had shapes cut into them large enough to allow light in and for the painter to look out on the world.

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