Archinect
anchor

How long to be a black belt in architecture?

RValu100

How long does it take to become a black belt (or black turtleneck) in architecture? Are there skill levels that denote white belt, brown belt, etc?

 
Sep 8, 22 8:59 am
Non-ASD

For a black belt in Architecture this is the level you should be aiming for.

Sep 8, 22 9:03 am  · 
3  · 
monosierra

Start an Instagram practice before school starts and you can rightfully claim to be a blackbelt.

Sep 8, 22 9:37 am  · 
 · 
max.lakonsky

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question, as the amount of time it takes to achieve a black belt in architecture can vary depending on experience level, intensity of training, and natural ability. However, most experts agree that it takes an average of 10 years... it includes both the time spent acquiring the necessary education and hands-on experience

Sep 8, 22 9:55 am  · 
 · 

The ten year timeframe to become an expert at something only applies to tasks that are comprised of a very narrow skillset. Complex skills like architecture aren't one of these tasks.

By your comment after five years of school and five years of real world experience you'd be an expert architect.  That simply isn't true since most people have just passed of their licensing exams by that point.  

Except for Non.  He was born and fourth degree black belt in architecture.  

Sep 8, 22 10:01 am  · 
3  · 

How long - your entire life.  


Sep 8, 22 9:58 am  · 
1  · 
Non Sequitur

break 8 concrete blocks (split-face, for artistic flair) with your fore-head without spilling your late.  

Sep 8, 22 10:52 am  · 
1  · 
Miyadaiku

Bonus points if you can do a jump move headbutt through an opening and break some bond beam blocks.

Sep 8, 22 11:54 pm  · 
 · 
curtkram

probably doesn't need to be said, but you have to do it without scratching your corbu glasses.

Sep 9, 22 11:14 am  · 
 · 
atelier nobody

Eric Clapton played his first recording sessions (with the Yardbirds) in 1963 and released his first solo album in 1970.

In 1989 he titled his 11th solo album "Journeyman".

I got my first drafting job in 1994 - I understand what Clapton meant...

Sep 8, 22 1:15 pm  · 
 · 
bowling_ball

The more experience you gain, the more you come to understand that you'll never know everything, or do everything perfectly every time.


As somebody with actual belts in a bunch of things, this isn't a great way to look at the profession at all. It's simply a different beast.


Based on my own experience and those of my colleagues, some of us start hitting our stride about 10-12 years in (not including school) but for others it may take 20. It's a marathon, not a sprint.

Sep 8, 22 1:24 pm  · 
2  · 
b3tadine[sutures]

Question: how's your single leg takedown, and baseball choke?

Sep 8, 22 1:50 pm  · 
 · 

It's ::meh:: Grappling is for if I miss with my gun and bow. 'Murica.

Sep 8, 22 1:56 pm  · 
2  · 
Miyadaiku

Here in Japan after you design your first dojo, when the building is occupied you have the option to storm the dojo and challenge the master. You announce yourself as a literal god of architecture and declare battle to the death via fencing with T-squares. Upon defeat of the sensei you may take his belt and wear it back to the office. You must now lead his lost disciples as well into the abyss that is architecture or lose your honor forever. Appropriate forms for registration of the black belt and the disciples will be faxed to you. Don't forget to stamp them and send them back to the local building dept.

Sep 8, 22 9:43 pm  · 
7  · 

What happens if you lose?  Do you have to perform some type of architectural seppuku?

Sep 9, 22 10:04 am  · 
 · 
Miyadaiku

Self-disembowelment using the 60 degree corner of your triangle.

Sep 11, 22 7:47 pm  · 
 · 

Fitting. Now excuse me, I need to go find my 60 degree triangle.

Sep 12, 22 10:49 am  · 
 · 
Wood Guy

It seems to be around age 40-50 that residential architects and designers know enough to be successful on their own. Some outliers get there earlier, and some never do, but that's what I've seen. I'm about to turn 49 and just starting to really feel like I know what I'm doing on all aspects of home design. I had plenty of confidence when I was younger but looking back I didn't have all of the skills yet. In 20 years I'll probably say the same thing about what I know now.

Sep 9, 22 10:41 am  · 
6  · 
x-jla

The experimental spirit of youth and the experience that comes with age seem to be in harmony around age 40-60. That’s probably different in different professions. Before that period, the experience falls short of the ambition, and after that the ambition falls short of the experience.

Sep 10, 22 7:56 pm  · 
1  · 
Stasis

I agree.. i think architects bloom/mature around that age range. When I go to the job sites, GCs/Subs take my colleagues (little over 60) more seriously than they do to me, even though he and I were saying the exactly the same thing. I too have tendency/preference towards older architects than the younger ones.

x-jia's spot on... I don't listen to anyone under 35 who talks really big about what they can do.. :).  Some of them still believe the GC can and should step up and take their Rhino models into shop drawings...  Under their ambition of creating beautiful space, some still think they can make changes later during construction without ever facing the client's wrath over a change order.

Sep 13, 22 4:03 pm  · 
 · 
JLC-1

https://www.feacinstitute.org/...

Sep 9, 22 6:25 pm  · 
1  · 
atelier nobody

LOLRay Liotta Goodfellas Laughing Scene Meme And Viral GIF Meaning Explained -  The SportsGrail

Sep 12, 22 8:38 pm  · 
 · 
whistler

When the contractors either salute you or bow when you walk on site!


Sep 13, 22 1:55 pm  · 
3  · 
Stasis

lol, that happens very rarely or the GCs strategically put up fake respectful façade to put architects at ease, then blame you later for design changes/errors/omissions.

You do get a little respect for showing up in a F-150 truck instead of a full efficient compact cars. 

Sep 13, 22 3:58 pm  · 
 · 
whistler

Drop some F-bombs and buy Friday beers goes a long way too! Fancy euro cars not so much!

Sep 13, 22 4:11 pm  · 
1  · 
Stasis

lol, spot on.. one GC called and shouted at me 'Don't F^$* with me, Boy!' I did realize later that he's old enough to be my father. We brushed it off later over a BBQ lunch :).

Sep 13, 22 4:24 pm  · 
 · 
archanonymous

When they see you know your way around a jobsite and can run a tape like a pro, that happens pretty quickly.

Sep 16, 22 7:42 pm  · 
 · 
whistler

That's a low bar for a black belt! ... I would expect that of any registered Architect. I have to say it's always a bit of a fencing match with the "know it all" site superintendent, but all fair. In fact it's when you can win a code compliance battle / interpretation with the local building inspector / plan checker when you can put some notches on your belt to becoming a black belt!

Sep 16, 22 8:21 pm  · 
2  · 
bowling_ball

I put a GC in his place, way too harshly, when he interrupted me for the umpteenth time in front of the client. I'm not a chatty person so it was completely unwarranted. I threatened him physically.

Sep 16, 22 9:14 pm  · 
1  · 
bowling_ball

Oops. Anyway two weeks later, he calls to hire me to design his house. We've become good friends and have since worked on $100M+ in projects together.

Sep 16, 22 9:15 pm  · 
4  · 
MinArch

Some of the answers are really funny:))

Sep 19, 22 11:00 pm  · 
 · 

We try.

Sep 20, 22 10:09 am  · 
 · 

Block this user


Are you sure you want to block this user and hide all related comments throughout the site?

  • ×Search in: