Archinect
anchor

Metaverse

justavisual

Guy guys! New idea - use all the 3d models of projects never built to populate the metaverse! Go!

https://www.archdaily.com/9752...


 
Jan 18, 22 10:21 am

I think its neat that people are beginning to build in decentraland, but its literally second life 2.0. What i do not like is this whole "metaverse Architect" as i have seen many articles call digital builders that. Just another way to water down the term "architect"

Jan 19, 22 10:56 am  · 
 · 
monosierra

Why not. It's a win for young designers. How many times do you see folks complaining about the designer's lack of agency, not to mention the constraints of gravity and finance. Now all that is gone. Unless it comes at the detriment of practice in the real world, I think it's cool that architects get to exercise freedom in a meta-world without consequence.

It'll be funny when users without any design experience start building their own virtual buildings with freeware.

Jan 19, 22 11:31 am  · 
 · 
justavisual

But like - am I missing something? A world with no constraints at all - no reality to contend with - not even gravity - and then they go an make a city grid?? Like...where is the imagination?


Jan 19, 22 11:36 am  · 
2  · 
monosierra

The market's taste determines it, I guess. You still have to design stuff that whoever uses the metaverse wants. And be better at it than users who can DIY with freeware. Until whoever runs that section of the metaverse sets up rules (I'd imagine view corridors and light access would still be issues, even in a virtual world!), it could be the wild west.

In all likelihood, the metaverse creations will look a lot like real world or well-known fictional buildings. There's no reference otherwise. It's like trying to imagine a brand new color - you still recourse to existing colors as a starting point.

Jan 19, 22 11:44 am  · 
 · 
SneakyPete

You might enjoy the novel Fall by Neal Stephenson. It discusses the creation of something from nothing and the human propensity to continue to be controlled by the world as they understand it even without rules. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fall;_or,_Dodge_in_Hell

Jan 19, 22 11:46 am  · 
1  · 
monosierra

Hehe I quoted that book in another thread. That the dead people ended up living in a boring recreation of their former lives, overseen by fantasy tropes, was the highlight for me.

Jan 19, 22 11:53 am  · 
1  · 
SneakyPete

If I'm totally honest I couldn't get through the middle part where the author spend hundreds of pages wanking off about the new worlds creation. It's a shame because I know that Stephenson usually wraps things up really nicely. It was just so goddamn boring.

Jan 19, 22 12:07 pm  · 
 · 
z1111

I think it is ridiculously inane. The next time a programmer has the termerity to call themselves an architect we
should post that image.

Jan 19, 22 1:10 pm  · 
 · 
z1111

*temerity*

Jan 19, 22 1:15 pm  · 
 · 
monosierra

SneakyPete - It was slog for me too. The world building was interesting but Stephenson doesn't do much with it. The afterlife was as inane as the fantasy fiction tropes trotted out - I get the point that the afterlife was bound by the memories and tropes of the living, but the novel went far too long before the predictable Good Vs Evil ending.

Jan 19, 22 2:15 pm  · 
1  · 
SneakyPete

That's a bummer. I think I'll just find a good synopsis.

Jan 19, 22 2:32 pm  · 
 · 
Almosthip

Grid blocks are easier to sell

Jan 19, 22 12:36 pm  · 
 · 
cipyboy

This…

Mar 24, 22 3:18 pm  · 
1  · 
OneLostArchitect

isn’t this what Balkins does? 

Apr 22, 22 7:16 am  · 
 · 
rcz1001

Heh, well you can be a virtual building architect design virtual buildings in cyberspace. Of course, a license isn't required for being such because virtual buildings don't kill people if they collapse... only virtual avatars which can just respawn. However, I do support regulating the title architect and where such work would constitute public health, safety and welfare in a serious level where incompetence can lead to serious bodily harm or death to occupants... with existing exemptions being the exception to the norm but again, designing a building versus designing a virtual building are of two completely different level of seriousness relating to HSW. 

You can express your architectural art side with virtual buildings which you might not have as much freedom and latitude to do with actual physically real buildings. It is another revenue stream opportunity to keep busy. Of course, not all architects may want to do that and that is totally fine. I think we just have to be making sure our enforcement of the title respects these other fields and endeavors while making a clear message that use of the architect title to design real buildings in the real world not the virtual world (or metaverse) would require a license and many such projects in the real world would require a license but as long as it's virtual and not applied to being used in the real world as well, you wouldn't need a license but when you do, licensing laws and regulations may become applicable and would be enforced. 

I think licensing boards should not be wasting its resources on stuff like this or going after those who design these virtual buildings calling themselves virtual building architects or metaverse architects or such when they are solely designing buildings in a virtual world no different than already people do with designing buildings in video games which are 'virtual worlds' or 'metaverses' so to speak. Why bother when it is people who not licensed engaging in the actual practice of architecture designing buildings intended to be built, which would require an architect to design and stamp/seal the plans prepared per the laws. That is what the board should focus on aside from making sure those who are licensed are abiding by the laws and rules and discipline them when they do violate the laws and rules that they agreed to abide by. 

I do not believe we need to be wasting financial resources on things that isn't going away just because you scream and whine about it because an architects as a whole is likely to not outnumber the shear number of people in the software/IT field that is on an international level which the board could never hope to get anywhere with going after. 

Like good like going after some "Virtual Building architect" or "Metaverse Architect" who is in India who can literally tell the state licensing board to go *bleep* themselves and they just can not hope to compel them to pay the fine or extridict them because it's not something like murder or other such crimes. They are going to be about as effective as our state and federal government is about stopping unsolicited calls from India and phone number spoofing and stuff like that. In short, good luck. So why piss money down that toilet with practically 0% effectiveness to stopping such. 

Courts have already made rulings that constrains the licensing board enforcement to a certain degree. Therefore, I believe it is important that we don't waste resources of the licensing board on fruitless efforts. There is practicality to consider.

Apr 22, 22 4:01 pm  · 
 · 
Miyadaiku

If you get licensed in the Metaverse, will it be reciprocal for Minecraft?

Apr 25, 22 10:39 pm  · 
 · 
rcz1001

Well, the license is your software license.... lol. Anyway, I don't think it is best use of state resources to fuss with stuff that doesn't matter and has no more danger to HSW than all the architects of the "virtual worlds" that already existed for the past 40 years or so. However, perhaps some folks with architectural training might enjoy doing something using their skills and being paid that isn't necessarily designing buildings to be built. It's up to them if they want to. At the same time, I think we just have to be mindful that being a "metaverse" architect does not mean you can design non-exempt buildings are use the architect title for when designing buildings intended to be built. The license is, after all, about HSW matters because if it wasn't there wouldn't be the architectural licensing in the first place.

Apr 26, 22 4:30 am  · 
 · 
monosierra

I'd love to read more about the technical aspects of metaverse design - what kind of software or workflows do they use, what becomes of the design priorities in a world without gravity or material performance etc. From what little I know, it seems game designers and VFX artists are better trained to take advantage than most traditionally trained architects.

Apr 26, 22 10:41 am  · 
 · 

Block this user


Are you sure you want to block this user and hide all related comments throughout the site?

  • ×Search in: