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Container placed on its side ok or not?

TheDude

Hi guys,

I have a project I am working on and don't know if this idea can work. Hope someone can help me

I would like to flip the containers on their side. The reason why is I need a max height of 5m.

Standard size 6m(20Ft) container has a height of 2,60 Two of them on top of each other will be more than 5m.
So I was thinking to flip them on their side(2,44) this will give me total height of 4,88. 
The doors will be closed and not used. Nothing will be stored inside the container or even moved around. I want to build a platform so people can go up. It needs to be max at 5m height x 6m length x 6m width. will build the platform out of wood.
The question is, is that possible to build it like that?
Hope this makes sense how I explain it.
Cheers

 
Jan 20, 21 10:31 am
Wood Guy

Possible? Yes. Safe? Depends entirely on the design loads, product specs and how long you expect these to remain in service. 

Jan 20, 21 10:35 am  · 
 · 
Non Sequitur

Not likely.  Containers are built for one purpose only, and it's to stack vertically for transport.  Their strength comes in part due to the corrugation of the walls... which is turned sideways, become useless.

Jan 20, 21 10:42 am  · 
1  · 
Almosthip

Just say NO! to shipping containers as architecture.

Jan 20, 21 10:45 am  · 
3  · 
TheDude

its for a film shooting nothing staying there for ever.

Jan 20, 21 10:52 am  · 
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TheDude

Wood Guy thanks for answering. Its for a film shooting will be used as a balcony of a set. Max 100 people on it

Film shooting max 2 months

Jan 20, 21 10:46 am  · 
 ·  1
Non Sequitur

Don't.

Jan 20, 21 10:46 am  · 
2  · 
TheDude

ok well noted. Just wondering why they hold tons and I would use 4 containers laying side ways. With a max load on top of it of 2t. And that will be spread.

Jan 20, 21 10:51 am  · 
 · 
Wood Guy

100 people would be 10 tons, not 2 tons. It may be fine, but Non is right, they are designed for one purpose and may not have the structural integrity required for your purpose. At least have a licensed engineer take responsibility for it before someone gets hurt.

Jan 20, 21 10:56 am  · 
 · 
Almosthip

What NS said, they are structurally loaded from top to bottom with point loads on the corners, they would crumble if turned on the sides

Jan 20, 21 10:57 am  · 
 · 
Wood Guy

"Crumble" is probably overstating the case. The seams are fully welded, the steel is relatively thick, the corrugations provide lateral strength. But I'd definitely be cautious. (I've probably spent more time in and around containers than most architects, YMMV.)

Jan 20, 21 10:59 am  · 
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TheDude

Thanks wood guy ill do it with scaffolding.

Jan 20, 21 11:05 am  · 
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TheDude

we are using containers at the back of the set to hold the set. At the same time using it as storage, production offices......

Thats why I wanted to use them to build the platform. If thats not possible ill just use scaffolding then

Jan 20, 21 10:57 am  · 
 · 
TheDude

guys thanks so much for the info will get it sorted with some good old scaffolding


Jan 20, 21 11:00 am  · 
2  · 
SneakyPete

Rent the scaffold and you don't have to figure out where it goes when you're done.

Jan 20, 21 1:17 pm  · 
 · 
JAK-90825
Those are built to stack vertically. If you intend to flip it on its side your going to need to add steel framing to it in order to compensate for the lack of reinforcement they are manufactured with in that direction.
Jan 20, 21 1:27 pm  · 
1  · 

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