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UK Architecture question

pegazeus

I'm currently thinking about the next couple of years and how it should ideally go for me. I'm planning to do my Part 2 (Masters - Architecture) in 2022 then getting another Masters in 2024 with either Urban Design/Project Management (I'll finish this in 2025 if everything goes according to plan).

I need 2 years of experience minimum to be eligible to do part 3 (licensure) so can I do these years of experience in project management with a mix of some architecture or does it strictly need to be as an architectural assistant/designer? RIBA's websites do not make this bit clear. 

If you're wondering why I want to do the years of experience in project management, it's because I need at least 3 years of experience in most cases to do an MBA (which the whole family has, and I think it would help me once I set up my own firm if I turn out to be one of the lucky ones). 

I know all this sounds too optimistic and idealistic on my part, but I need an answer lol.


 
Jan 15, 21 3:37 pm
apscoradiales

Want my answer? Leave GB and move to EU. One has a future, the other does not.

Btw, why don't you call RIBA, and ask to speak to someone over there?

Jan 15, 21 4:05 pm  · 
1  · 
Non Sequitur

also worth pointing out that two master degrees and a MBA does not mean you will have any success opening a firm. School is not equivalent to the real world, so don't skip out on those exp years.

2  · 
pegazeus

I agree completely. Brexit really did a number on my options because I was originally thinking of going to Delft (netherlands) for my masters but now the fee went from 2kish to almost 20k (euros), so that's just not affordable for me anymore. And unfortunately, leaving GB is not really an option.

 · 
robhaw

@ Pegaseus, If you factor in the fees for 3 consecutive masters in the UK that's over £30k on degrees that might not offer you exactly the benefits you are looking for. It's unfortunate that your study options are limited due to Brexit (I left the UK for my masters in the Netherlands, but fortunately I was able to access the previous fee scales.) However, if you wish to develop primarily as an architect, I would suggest that you complete your architectural masters at a place like Cardiff or Sheffield which offer 1-year placements as part of their MArch, since this would drive down costs and simultaneously allow you to develop experience. 

Later on, once you have accumulated some years' experience and have matured more as a professional, you could potentially also explore the PM or finance options. This could be done on a part-time or day-release mode (and possible with a sponsorship from the right employer) while also working in the industry and getting valuable experience, which as NS mentioned is the essence to building a good career. Are you on a year-out right now and which school did you previously attend? Also, did you have an offer from Delft for CME or Architecture?

 · 
pegazeus

@New Sequitur I agree, but opening a firm isn't my ultimate goal though an MBA would definitely be beneficial if I do go down that route. Getting two masters degree is just the early start to open doors for more decent offers that most of my peers wouldn't have, especially in this economic climate. I plan on staying on the built environment one way or another so doing another Masters course is more of an investment and can't really hurt one way or another.

The MBA is also to increase employability, be eligible for promotions, and get better salary offers (considering how terribly architects get paid here). As for missing out on years of experience, a full-time MBA in the UK  only really takes a year and I'm planning on simply doing a part-time one (there are some unis in London that offer evening classes) so I can still stay in full-time employment.

Jan 15, 21 4:18 pm  · 
 · 
Non Sequitur

More schooling is not the answer if you want to increase your worth and chances at rewarding employment.

 · 
lower.case.yao

An MBA increases employability for business and tech management roles, not for architects though. It’s completely unnecessary and seems counter productive if you want to stay in architecture. Firms won’t want to hire you more with your MBA unless it’s for BD roles.

Jan 15, 21 4:22 pm  · 
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