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tduds

Not the most photogenic meal I've made, but it was a damn good & relatively easy weeknight dish:

Mushroom-Buttered* gnocchi  dried shitake mushrooms, lima beans, & spinach in mushroom broth (from rehydrating the shitakes), with garlic, shallots, thyme, and parmesan.

(*This fall I made mushroom-infused butter from the cuttings of foraged lobster mushrooms. Had a few ounces of it kicking around the fridge. Amazing stuff.)

Dec 16, 20 9:00 pm  · 
4  · 
archanonymous

I love the gnocchi here they look like little miniature potatoes with the spices coating them. 10/10 on presentation, cute af.

2  · 
tduds

Thanks!

 · 
Wood Guy

They do look like little potatoes. Yum. Mushroom-infused butter sounds amazing. We forage Reiki on our land and sometimes find gray Oyster, but we have to buy Lobster mushrooms. (Reiki mushrooms taste horrible, btw, but good for ya.)

1  · 
tduds

My wife got some reiki powder with other herbs & what not. It's supposed to help with mood. I don't know how making my coffee taste like garbage is supposed to help my mood but here we are.

1  · 
Wood Guy

My wife dries and powders some of ours, and puts it in our homemade stocks. It disappears pretty well that way.

1  · 
tduds

This one cracked me up because the color and texture were nearly identical to Kraft Mac n Cheese. Trust me it was made from scratch.

Strozzapretti w/ butternut + thyme puree. Smoky kale crisps. Toasted pine nuts.

Dec 16, 20 9:08 pm  · 
5  · 
x-jla

Love pine nuts. Pinole cookies are

1  · 
x-jla

*pignole cookies are my favorite

 · 
Wood Guy

That looks awesome, duds. People who say they don't like kale haven't had it cooked creatively. And mac-and-cheese is irresistible in any form.

1  · 
tduds

Crispy kale is an unsung gem. And so easy - just toss in a little oil, salt + spices if you want (I used smoked paprika here. Pairs nicely with the sweetness of butternut squash) and pop on a sheet tray for 15 minutes.

1  · 
Wood Guy

Breakfast on Sunday was toasted bread sauteed with bacon fat from our pigs as the first layer, topped with onions, a lot of garlic (~10 cloves--we're garlic-rich, just planted 1,000 bulbs for next year) and brocollni, covered with whisked eggs (not too much--I didn't want this to be a tortilla espaniola), with a good Scottish cheddar on top.

Then the piece de resistance, my new addiction--chili crisp. Have you tried it? It adds incredible depth of flavor, color and texture to many dishes. This was made locally (https://trilly-maine.com/produ...) and aside from the cheese everything else was grown by local farmers.

It was, as I like to tell my wife when I like a dish, "edible." The toast compacted to a nice fatty crust, the eggs just held everything together without being overwhelming, and the flavors were balanced. Thanks for the inspiration, everyone.

Dec 17, 20 9:26 am  · 
4  · 
apscoradiales

Yummy! if that was for breakfast , I wonder what was for lunch!!!

1  · 
archanonymous

Probably a nap!

1  · 
Wood Guy

Haha, a salad if I recall correctly.

It was not as rich as it might look. There were just a few thin slices of cheese, and four eggs for the whole dish. 


 · 
tduds

That looks fantastic! I love a good breakfast

1  · 
Wood Guy

It's one of the most important meals of the day! Along with lunch and supper.

4  · 
still_c

That seems to be so good! I'd love to have it for breakfast. Gonna try it on Saturday.

1  · 
tduds

Working through the last of the garden gourds, last night I made a stuffed roasted acorn squash. Stuffing is pork sausage, shallots & bell peppers, red quinoa, plus garlic fennel & thyme. Topped with mozzarella & broiled to a crisp. 


Dec 17, 20 12:32 pm  · 
2  · 
Wood Guy

You've managed to show two dishes in a row that make me want to eat squash--that's saying something!

2  · 
tduds

Squash is great if you treat it right! Like all things, I suppose.

1  · 
Wood Guy

Believe me, I've tried. For many years we grew several hundred pounds of different types. I probably just got sick of it, actually. I do like it sometimes, especially butternut.

1  · 
tduds

I think I'd get sick of several *hundred* pounds of anything! Butternut is a workhorse, but my real favorites are delicata & spaghetti. Last fall I made a surprisingly delicious spaghetti squash pad thai and a pretty interesting spaghetti squash carbonara. It's all about mixing up the flavors so you don't feel like you're eating the same thing every day for a month.

 · 
Wood Guy

LOL, yeah we fed a lot to our pigs and later to our compost pile. But we ate a lot too. My MIL grows delicata and it is good too. Nobody in my family likes spaghetti squash, which is too bad because I think it's good for some things--just not to replace pasta, if you're of Italian heritage. That said, we have a lot of guanciale in the freezer, maybe I'll find some spaghetti squash and make something carbonara-like.

1  · 
archanonymous

I made Mediterranean-style fish stew last weekend. Definitely not bouillabaisse, I wouldn't want to claim that. 


I actually set out to make mixed seafood chowder, which is why there are potatoes in it, but then it was so delicious (and there was so much of it) I decided it would be a shame to put any dairy in it. 

I also went back and watched the Julia and Jacque episode on it - I love how flexible they are on the recipe. Will make again with their tips incorporated next time. Forget making a rouillet though, no one got time for that. 


Dec 17, 20 1:18 pm  · 
3  · 
Wood Guy

Sometimes I like how cream pulls disparate flavors and textures together, but I can see why you'd want those ingredients to stand on their own.

2  · 
x-jla


just hooked my kid up with some chicken cutlets.  

Dec 18, 20 11:54 am  · 
2  · 
Wood Guy

Looks good! What do you use for batter?

 · 
x-jla

Just use milk and egg, then a mix of flour ,bread crumbs, salt, pepper, and a little dried parsley.

2  · 
apscoradiales

yep! and olive oil with some butter.

 · 
x-jla



This weekend did some meatballs with raisins and pine nuts, sauce from scratch, cooked for like 8 hours....some broccoli rabe (favorite vegetable of all time).  

Dec 18, 20 12:07 pm  · 
4  · 
x-jla

Damn, made some banging Barbacoa tacos and homemade salsa with roasted poblanos, Anaheim’s, etc...fried corn tortillas, avacado sauce....the other day...forgot to take pics.

1  · 
tduds

Classic. Looks great!

 · 
Wood Guy

Oh man, that looks good. Someone just gave my MIL a leg of lamb that we'll have for Christmas--I hope she makes something like that.

2  · 
tduds

We're having lamb tonight. The season of feasting begins (see below). I'm so excited.

1  · 
archanonymous

Agree on Broccoli Rabe. My favorite use of it is Broccoli Rabe with home made orecchiette and fennel sausage.

2  · 
Wood Guy

It's really a perfect vegetable.

 · 
x-jla

And very healthy

1  · 
Wood Guy

I roasted some Brocolli Rabe (aka brocollini and other names) for dinner last night, and though of this thread. Not really photo-worthy but like many vegetables, Rabe takes well to roasting.

 · 
tduds

Here it is... what I call "Feasting Season"

Today is my father-in-law's birthday. Christmas eve is my sister-in-law's birthday. Then Christmas day. Then the 27th is my wife's birthday. Then of course there's New Years Eve and New Years Day. As you've seen, I love cooking, and my other sister-in-law is a professional chef, so we split the duties roughly down the middle and it's all so over the top and so fun.

Every year is a fun game of trying to make 4-6 killer dinners without overlapping or repeating, and without making everyone so over-satiated that they're sick of it before the week's end.

The plan is: Lamb tonight. Oysters, Crab & Duck on XMas eve. Tenderloin on XMas. Ramen (from scratch, of course) for my wife's birthday. And pasta with some kind of ragu for NYE. I'll make a photo post when it's all done!

Merry Holidays Archinect!

Dec 18, 20 3:09 pm  · 
6  · 
Wood Guy

WOW. Sounds amazing. Also, I need to know how you stay so skinny.

 · 
tduds

Dog needs two walks a day. That & a lot of hiking when the weather permits.

1  · 
Non Sequitur

Sounds great. All our holiday events are cancelled (some by necessity, others by me) so no family feast.

 ·  1
tintt

My line up for feasting season is green chili for Christmas Eve, prime rib for Christmas day, and pigs in a blanket for New Years Eve. My kids will make the pigs in a blanket meal.

1  · 
Non Sequitur

So this is what it takes for a wood guy thumbs down? To clarify, my parents are inside our social bubble, so the little one gets to see his grandparents. Everyone else (inc aunts/cousins, even my grand mother). Sorta looking forward to calm holiday not filled with crammed and loud dinner parties.

1  · 
Wood Guy

Sorry, I meant to clarify--boo that you have to cancel plans, +++++ for being a responsible citizen. Binary communication leaves room for misunderstanding ;-)

1  · 
apscoradiales

Wood Guy,

Bought a leg of lamb today in the store...all the way from Australia...we will have it on Christmas day. Cost me as much as a whole lamb all done on the spit in some parts of Europe!!! Better be good!

Dec 18, 20 6:26 pm  · 
 · 
Non Sequitur

I've never had lamb... and I would not know what do to with it. I think that Gordon Ramsay would pop out of my pantry and call me a wanker if I ever tried to cook a rack and left it 8 seconds too long in the pan.

 · 
randomised

I hope it tastes as good as its carbon footprint!

 · 
Non Sequitur

Rando, don't worry, the carrots are organic.

1  · 
curtkram

the best way to cook lamb is to go to a restaurant with a good chef

 · 
randomised

organic farming produces more emissions than conventional farming though ;-)

1  · 
Non Sequitur

fine... I guess my joke was lost on this crowd.

1  · 
randomised

Just needs a bit of seasoning.

1  · 
Wood Guy

Rando, I'd need to see some stats on that... but if you're talking about Big Organic vs Big Conventional ag, you might be right. Organic will have less negative impact on the soil though.

I grow my own using beyond-organic techniques, or from local farmers who do the same. I guarantee our carbon footprints are lower than most Americans'.

 · 
Wood Guy

Aps, I hope it's good. Why did you choose Australian lamb instead of locally grown? The leg of lamb my MIL got was a gift from a carpenter working on her house. (We're building the addition featured here: https://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/article/all-about-helical-piles.) He raises sheep and does other farming on the side. We get along well ;-)

 · 
Wood Guy

Non, I haven't cooked a lot of lamb but find low, slow cooking in an oven works well with most red meat, after searing on the stovetop. Last night I did that with country ribs from our pigs. It's a pretty forgiving method. If you don't like the flavor on its own, chop it up and put it in a strongly flavored stew. 

 · 
randomised

Organic veggies require more land (lower yields per hectare) and that results in more deforestation.

 · 
randomised

“ Organically farmed food has a bigger climate impact than conventionally farmed food, due to the greater areas of land required.” https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/12/181213101308.htm

 · 
randomised

Carbon Footprint Ranking of Food

no.1 Lamb 39.2 kilos CO2 equivalent or 91 car miles equivalent: https://www.greeneatz.com/foods-carbon-footprint.html

 · 
Wood Guy

Rando, lamb grown locally 100% on pasture with abundant water available is not the same as factory farming operations.

 · 
Non Sequitur

M’y jive is with the label and how it’s convince so many that it’s better because of the label. It’s not, at least not without a whole bunch more context, but the average wanker consumer only has time to read part of a one headline in their Facebook feed before making life philosophy choices.

 · 
Non Sequitur

Excuse moi, french keyboard on. Makes for odd word autochoices. No regrets, leaving as is.

 · 
x-jla

It’s a more complicated equation rando. Need to take into account depletion of top soil, embodied energy of transport, embodied energy of chemical herbicide production and its usage impact, etc. An acre or permaculture land is not as destructive as an acre of monoculture land, and it has a greater carbon sequestration potential and overall lower impact in terms of harvest and management.

 · 
x-jla

*pesticide

 · 
x-jla

Forest farming is really interesting. Anyone experiment with this method?

 · 
Wood Guy

Non, I totally agree, and the organic farming community was mostly against the government taking over the term 20+ years ago. The best term I've heard, and used above, for those who practice truly organic (restorative, not extractive) agriculture is "beyond organic." It's still not a great term. Another is "restoration agriculture" but that doesn't always cover annual crops very well.

X-jla, I have a couple of books on it and have thought a LOT about how I could do more on my land, which is mostly wooded. I think it has potential for small-scale homesteaders but hard to scale in a way that would have broad impact. What do you know about it? 

1  · 
x-jla

I like the idea, but don’t have much firsthand experience being I live in a desert climate. It seems that there is maybe more potential for livestock. In Spain, they raise their best pigs in pine forests, from what I remember...

 · 
Wood Guy

Ah, I didn't realize you were a desert-dweller. I have 30 acres, only about 2.5 of which are cleared. When we raise pigs they are partly on pasture and partly in open forest. Our town is named Palermo, so we jokingly call our pork "jamon Palermico," a play on "jamon Iberico," the most famous of the Spanish pigs raised in open woodland, the Dehesa. Unfortunately we don't have centuries-old nut trees to feed the pigs, so ours get a lot of grain. I've tried to get our goats into the woods but they are terrified of being away from the pasture they're used to.

 · 
randomised

“ Rando, lamb grown locally 100% on pasture with abundant water available is not the same as factory farming operations.”

No it’s not the same, but looking at things holistically from a global perspective, if everyone would grow their lamb like that more forests would have to be chopped down to make way for pasture...it might still look sustainable from a personal perspective, but once you zoom out it’s a different story.

 · 
Non Sequitur

Rando, I'm all for a good reductio ad absurdum (it is, afterall, one of my primary modus operandi), but everything becomes the worst thing ever if you zoom out enough.

 · 
Wood Guy

Rando, globally I'll agree. Maine, where I live, is by far the most heavily forested state in of the lower 48 and we also have the second most organic farms per capita in the country, but we also have a tiny population--only 1.3 million people, a mid-sized city at best anywhere else in the world. In the mid-1800s much of this area was cleared for sheep farming to fulfill a need for wool. It's a good example of why eating what is produced locally (without undue effort) is the most sustainable approach. In some places (Maine, New Zealand) that might mean sheep. Elsewhere it might mean mangoes.

 · 
apscoradiales

Wood Guy,

No local lamb if you're life depended on it!

It all comes from AUS up here. There are farmers in Ontario who raise sheep, but cannot - or should not go there now - due to covid.

In any event local stuff is not always cheaper than something from millions of miles away. 

Dec 19, 20 5:48 pm  · 
 · 
Wood Guy

You're in Canada? I thought you were in Europe for some reason. I agree that local is not always cheaper than imported food. As far as I'm concerned, though, price is the least important factor when buying food. When I was young and poor I felt differently, and even my now-financially secure mom can't pass up meat on sale for a dollar a pound. She also has good health insurance. I don't, and pay more for food I trust instead.

 · 
apscoradiales

I was born in Europe, partially educated there, partially in Canada - worked in Canada, Europe, Middle East, Caribbean...in other words, all screwed up...:)))...!

For the price of that lamb leg I paid here, I could have had the whole lamb roasted on a spit in some parts of Europe...and lamb that ate local grass, and roamed the local fields. This one was probably raised in a factory, and fed all kinds of chemicals. But hey, what can you do when you live in a fast  country...

1  · 
JLC-1

lamb in patagonia

Cordero Entero Magallánico | Meatme - Club de Carnes

2  · 
apscoradiales

The only issue I have with that method is all the juices run off. You catch all the tasty juices when done on the spit.

3  · 
Non Sequitur

Is that your set-up there Aps? I have family that competes in (amateur) BBQ competitions and I'm always in awe with what they do with their grilling toys.

 · 
apscoradiales

Nope, I wish it was. There are ethnic restaurants/stores in Toronto/Mississauga where you can order them for festive occasions.

 · 
apscoradiales

Just to throw my two cents (Canadian - which is about 0.000001 American at the current exchange rate), I do not trust any organic food, unless it was grown by me. Too many shady people/farmers/corporations claiming "organic" - unless I watched it being planted and grown with my own eyes, it's all a pack of lies to me. In addition, I'm not paying 20 dollars for a tomato they claim is organically grown - f that! Same with "locally grown" fruits and veggies at farmers markets. If you kook carefully, you will find boxes behind the stands with label "Produce of Mexico". Or guys selling "locally grown" bananas! Yeah, right - grown in Timmins, Ontario or Laval, Quebec!!! That will be the day!

Dec 19, 20 6:16 pm  · 
 · 
bowling_ball

Show me the $20 price for an organic tomato. Seriously. I want proof. It must be tiring to go through life with such a huge chip on your shoulder. You sound paranoid and out of touch.

1  · 
Wood Guy

Aps, I trust "big organic" only slightly more than "big conventional" ag. But my wife and I buy most of our food from local farmers, many of whom we know personally and some who have become friends or clients. It's hard to grow enough food to feed yourself--I know, I've tried--but it's possible in many places to know where your food comes from. On the rare occasions we buy exotic food like avocados or citrus, we try to buy direct from established farms with a reputation for quality. It costs more than what you find at the grocery store, but that's why we make it a luxury, not a staple. Nobody needs to drink orange juice every morning, even if TV ads say you should. "Cheep food" is often a false economy.

 · 
randomised

And so instead you get your lamb all the way from Australia...you don’t trust your neighbours and local community, but eat what’s grown at the other end of the earth, something doesn’t add up here ;-)

 · 
Non Sequitur

I'd pay $20 for locally grown banana if it came from Timmins.

 · 
apscoradiales

I'm waiting for climate change so that they can grow them there!

 · 
Wood Guy

Climate change is here, but bananas won't be for a lot longer. Every banana we eat is a clone of a single plant and extremely susceptible to mounting pest and disease pressure. Eat 'em while you can!

 · 
x-jla

And chocolate :(

 · 
Wood Guy

Really? I didn't know that about chocolate. Boo.

 · 
apscoradiales

randomised,

if they had lamb in the local store from Quebec or Ontario, I'd buy it, but since they don't...

There is a farm in Ontario that has them, and a whole bunch more stuff that they raise or plant themselves, but they're like 6 hour driving distance away and 6 hours back....and we're not supposed to be driving around due to the virus. They make good sausages, cabbage rolls, soups, gravies, smoked meats, and the prices are reasonable - but that's because you deal with the wholeseller...retailers would demand a Kings Ransom for one sausage, so f that!


Dec 21, 20 9:26 am  · 
 · 
tduds

Yesterdays project: Ramen prep. Just over a gallon of rich, creamy tonkotsu broth, and in the background: 2 quarts of kombu dashi, plus a soy based tare. All told took about 10 hours. I steamed up every window in the house and the dog was going nuts over the smell.

Check back in next weekend for the finished product!

Dec 21, 20 11:12 am  · 
7  · 
Wood Guy

How do you make the broth? We save any meat bones to make broth/stock (I'm not sure if there is a difference). We also keep the feet from butchered birds to make a creepy-looking but tasty broth.

1  · 
tduds

This was my first time making ramen base. It's a little more complicated than what I usually do. 

For my "normal" broths, I love to save veggie clippings and parmesan rinds in the freezer & once a year turn it into the most amazing parmesan broth. And a couple times I've taken the turkey carcass from thanksgiving and made soup out of that. Those are pretty straightforward - boil it for a few hours with your favorite aromatics & then strain. 

For ramen, you're making three parts. First is the broth (tonkotsu for this weekend) - which is a *ton* of bones & fat & bits. I got about 4lbs of pork trotters, 1.5lbs chicken feet, and a pound of pork belly (plus 2 more pounds to braise for serving). Plus one onion, about 6oz of cremini mushrooms, a head of garlic, and 2" ginger. I sauteed the non-meats for a few minutes then added the meat parts, covered with water and boiled for about 8 hours (topping off whenever the water level got below the solids), then strained. Part 2 is the Dashi: Soaked dried kombu in cold water for 2 hours, then slowly brought it up to almost a simmer (don't boil! It ruins the taste), removed the kombu and added dried shiitake. Steeped for another 45 minutes on barely a simmer, then set aside. Part 3 is Tare, which is a flavor bomb. Chicken broth, soy, mirin, more ginger, brown sugar, and rice vinegar. Boiled it to reduce by 50-70%. 

At dinner time, you combine the dashi & tonkotsu broth in a big pot and simmer. A little bit of tare goes into each bowl as you serve.

3  · 
archanonymous

@ WG - Broth includes meat which renders out its fats and proteins into the liquid. Stock is made with bones and scraps.

2  · 
Wood Guy

Duds, that sounds like a lot of work but I'm sure it's worth it. I know I enjoy asian soups of all sorts, and have wondered what made them so good.

Arch, thanks, that makes sense. I guess what I make is in between, mostly bones but with some meat scraps as well, cooked until I can crush the bones easily, anywhere from one to three days. Sometimes more than one batch from the same bones.

1  · 
apscoradiales

"...I steamed up every window in the house and the dog was going nuts over the smell..." LOL!!!

1  · 
tduds

It's a lot of time but less effort than I thought it'd be. That said, I'm doing this as a birthday present to my wife because she loves ramen and we've been missing it during the pandemic times since it's one of the few things I can't easily re-create at home. I dunno if I'd do this for just any old dinner.

1  · 
b3tadine[sutures]

Vegan Flour less Chocolate and Blueberry Cake, gluten-free and no refined sugar 

Sriracha Tahini Fudge, vegan, gluten-free and no refined sugar 

Vegan Baklava, gluten-free and no refined sugar 

Dec 23, 20 10:11 pm  · 
5  · 
Wood Guy

Those all look tasty, b3. I can't recall having chocolate and blueberries together--does any blueberry flavor come through? I'm a sucker for fudge and mixing heat with chocolate. I'm also a sucker for baklava, and yours looks amazing, not slimy with sugar--what did you use for a sweetener if not corn syrup or honey?

 · 
b3tadine[sutures]

The blueberries get pureed so the flavor is subtle, but it's rich. The baklava is made with date syrup, and thickened. There's sweetness, but not an overwhelming sweetness. The fudge, only 5 ingredients! I am making a tiramisu today, that is also using unrefined sugar, and is vegan and gluten-free.

1  · 
b3tadine[sutures]

I tried the baklava today, good, not super sweet and sticky, but good. I'm mostly making and giving it away.

1  · 
Wood Guy

Sounds good to me. I love dates but don't recall having or seeing date syrup. We get maple syrup from local farmers and go through a few gallons a year. That shocks some people but we use it as a concentrate to flavor carbonated water, on cereal, etc.. It would probably make a decent baklava as well.

1  · 
tintt

This thread is inspiring. I'm impressed. 

I tried to make rummy marshmallows and they were just ok. I need practice.

Dec 23, 20 11:55 pm  · 
1  · 
why_not_architecture

I am recently addicted to my New Baba Ganoush, which is now almost everyday side dish for dinner. I came up with this recipe and find it easier to make, more flavorful and more fiber. With enough fresh garlic is perfect anti-viral:)


New Wave Baba Ganoush: 


Cut the eggplant horizontaly ~3/4" slices, sprinkle sea salt on both sides, let them rest vertically 1 hour to get the juices out. Squeeze by hand each slice  (do not rinse), coat with olive oil both sides, put aluminum foil on top of a tray and bake in oven at 425 F until both sides have some brown. Flip midway. Put the baked egplant (with the skin!), olive oil, garlic paste to taste but should be strong, black pepper and mayonnaise (1 1/2 cup +/- for 3 eggplants) [no tahini] in food processor and pulse until the skin is broken to small pieces. Do not make it too smooth!  Taste for salt and pepper but should be slightly more than what you like as it will be absorbed. Add chopped pecans 1 cup for 3 eggplants. This need to be refrigerated for atleast 1 day before serving. Next day adjust again for salt, black pepper and if needs more mayo add that too. 


Let me know if you try it and what do you think.



Dec 24, 20 12:42 am  · 
1  · 
Wood Guy

I enjoy baba ganoush when done well. Unfortunately, most of the time the texture is too much like snot, and the flavor is not strong enough to make you think otherwise. Keeping it chunky and adding pecans instead of tahini probably helps the texture? Eggplants don't grow reliably here but we often make a baba-like dish with zucchini.

 · 
proto

Christmas Eve menu: roast boneless leg of lamb [local]; lemon garlic green beans; Yukon gold garlic mashed taters; trifle [raspberry base]

Happy holidays, y’all!

Dec 24, 20 10:54 am  · 
4  · 
citizen

That sounds amazing. What can I bring?  =O]

 · 
atelier nobody

As a single architect, I am whole-heartedly in favor of architects marrying chefs.

Dec 24, 20 8:50 pm  · 
2  · 
x-jla
We don’t play. 

Dec 24, 20 9:52 pm  · 
2  · 
x-jla





merry Christmas!

Dec 25, 20 7:55 pm  · 
2  · 
x-jla


.

Dec 25, 20 8:21 pm  · 
1  · 
bowling_ball

No pics but we cooked our first turkey ever today. Now dropping it off to the family in exchange for side dishes. Merry Christmas!



Dec 25, 20 8:31 pm  · 
3  · 
b3tadine[sutures]

Vegan Christmas

Vegan Tiramisu 

Dec 25, 20 10:49 pm  · 
3  · 
randomised

Another vegan Christmas here:



Bigos hunter’s stew with sauerkraut and a variety of mushrooms
Polish “Greek Style” fish (with baked selery disks instead of white fish) rolled in sushi nori seaweed sheets finished in a carrot sauce in the oven
Mushroom filo croquettes traditionally served with a red beet soup 
Different grilled veggies from the oven, baked potatoes, rucola salad, homemade bread and store made soy/nut balls.


Vegan spicy banana tomato cake for dessert and Portuguese red wine.


I cut the tomatoes for the rucola salad and poured the balsamic vinegar and virgin olive oil over the salad...



Dec 26, 20 9:36 am  · 
3  · 
randomised

*plates “Indigo Storm” by Faye Toogood!

 · 
x-jla

Made 2 Stromboli.  One with prosciutto and dates, and the other with cheese, salami, and Capicola.  Definitely need to work out today. 

Dec 26, 20 10:29 am  · 
1  · 
Wood Guy

Someone resurrected a kelp thread, which made me think of this: https://atlanticseafarms.com/c.... Most weekday mornings I make some variation of eggs and toast, with lacto-fermented veggies on the side. The fermented kelp doesn't taste quite like Japanese seaweed salad, but not far off, and the kim-chi is as good as any I've had. Lots of health benefits to eating lacto-fermented veggies.


Dec 30, 20 5:49 pm  · 
 · 
x-jla

the wife has covid, and being she’s Columbian I made her chicken and potato soup with Sazon and bay leaf.  It’s the cure.  

Dec 31, 20 12:48 pm  · 
 · 
x-jla

You can put Sazon on an old shoe and it would taste good. That msg is yummy

 · 
Wood Guy

I'm sorry to hear she has Covid, but agree that Sazon is tasty stuff. The myth around MSG is pervasive. (Cue someone claiming they're "allergic"...)

 · 
randomised

Ah crap x-jla! As losing sense of taste is one of the symptoms it probably doesn’t matter what you cook for her anyways...

 · 
x-jla

She did lose her taste and smell, but is feeling better. No more fever for 2 days.

1  · 
tduds

Opened a very generous birthday gift from my in-laws last night. Dee-licious.


Should we start a "Whatcha drinking?" thread?


Jan 16, 21 12:12 pm  · 
2  · 
Wood Guy

Absolutely! Or here is fine, up to you. I love a good Scotch, in small quantities. My wife can drink it neat but I need ice or water. We've been learning about wine for the last few months--it's been a fun distraction. We kicked it off with this movie, not bad: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2204371/.

 · 
Non Sequitur

I’ll be having a 14y glenlfiddich soon.

1  · 
Non Sequitur

Tduds, you need to fully circumcise the top of the bottle. No need to keep part of the foil wrapper up there.

1  · 
Wood Guy

Non, I used your circumcision comment on my wife last night when we opened a bottle of wine. It would have been hilarious if I hadn't needed to explain it. I laughed, anyway.

2  · 
Non Sequitur

Very good WG. It’s a comment I make often (less so now because COVID), but I mentioned to a buddy a while back on a 18y bottle and I was shocked, then angry, that the label on an expensive battle was a sticker. Not foil. A glued on sticker. Left white paper marks on the neck. Real sloppy circoncision job that night.

1  · 
Non Sequitur

My keyboard decided to use the French word. I’ll leave it.

 · 
Dokuser

What's cooking?...good lookin'

Jan 16, 21 3:02 pm  · 
1  · 
bowling_ball

Not gonna lie, I've eaten McDonalds two days in a row. Not proud of it but since this is my confessional, please go easy on me.

Jan 16, 21 11:59 pm  · 
3  · 
citizen

"Miss, I'd like my fries the same temperature as the surface of Mercury."  Straight-out-of-the-fryer = delicious.

 · 
Wood Guy

BB, I typically eat fast food once or twice a year, but in the year of Covid it's been more--when I'm out at lunchtime I just don't trust most of the mom-and-pop shops, even when I can find one, to follow safe practices, based on observation.

 · 
SneakyPete

They also seem to have forgotten the 'fast' part, with drive through lanes backing up into traffic.

 · 
apscoradiales

Fish, rice and mushrooms...last Friday's lunch.

Jan 19, 21 4:47 pm  · 
3  · 
citizen

Beige and beautiful!

 · 
apscoradiales

Yep, at least three different shades of beige.

 · 
Wood Guy

I remember in elementary school, once a week we'd have what I called "yellow lunch." While pretty colors can make a meal seem appealing, your beige lunch looks pretty tasty too!

 · 
citizen

Because food can be funny, and I don't know where else to post this after some 30 Rock viewing.

Liz Lemon in a busy NYC deli, hoping to order off-menu for clueless boyfriend:  "He'll have a catfish po'boy and diet Raspberry Fanta."

Jack Donaghy ordering for his supermodel-thin date: "The lady will have a cup of hot water with a chicken bone in it, and a bowl of salted ice cubes."

Jan 20, 21 2:13 pm  · 
2  · 
tduds

This is a great little pantry meal:

Ricotta dumplings, red sauce, herb oil, pecorino romano.

I often buy ricotta for a recipe that needs, like, 1/4 cup, then I'm stuck with a nearly full jar of cheese that's going to expire in a week. What to do? Mix it with flour, an egg, salt, herbs & lemon zest. Bam you got dumplings (aka Gnudi). Boil em like you'd make gnocchi. They also freeze for months.

Similarly, I took all the about-to-wilt herbs from our garden at the end of summer and steeped them in warm olive oil. Divided into small containers and into the basement freezer. A little drizzle on top of pasta dishes brings a fresh pop of basil & oregano that reminds me of summer.

This sauce wasn't from the garden, just some leftover sauce from last week. I do have about a gallon of garden roma tomato sauce divided & frozen in the basement. Can't wait to use that through the rest of winter.

I hate wasting food, so I totally dork out on little saving tricks like these. Also it tastes great!

Jan 20, 21 2:36 pm  · 
4  · 
apscoradiales

Too small of a portion, imo.

 · 
tduds

I like myself at the size I am.

1  · 
randomised

Too small portion? That plate's like half a meter diameter!

 · 
apscoradiales

20 dumplings only! Tiny portion.

 · 
randomised

Tiny? Those dumplings are at least the size of an egg of the Canadian goose!

 · 
tduds

You're both wrong, but they are very filling little things.

 · 
randomised

I know, was just pulling aps’ leg...

1  · 
apscoradiales

___ | ___

 · 
bowling_ball

Does anybody hunt here? I ran into a couple deer on my run tonight and I thought "hmmm, looks tasty!" 

Jan 20, 21 10:00 pm  · 
2  · 
archanonymous

I have hunted, but not actively anymore. And I could never do large mammals. 


Most memorable meal of my lifetime though was foraged berries and asparagus, fresh caught trout, and a couple of grouse we bagged while backpacking deep in Colorado wilderness. Cooked over an open campfire with just salt and wild herbs as seasonings. It is seared into my brain.

2  · 
Wood Guy

I've had a hunting license since I was 12 but have never actually hunted. When we moved to our farm I wanted to be closer to the food we eat and I debated between taking up hunting or raising meat animals. Decided to go with raising pigs, and eventually chickens, turkeys and maybe rabbits. Currently pausing those activities because it requires a lot of time for the reward, and it can be kind of gut wrenching. I'd like to take up hunting when I'm older and have more time. Or maybe just walk in the woods more.

 · 
x-jla

Just some chicken tacos, avacodo sauce, homemade salsa from various peppers, tomatoes, onion, etc...very tasty and spicy 


Jan 20, 21 11:05 pm  · 
3  · 
x-jla
Word
Jan 20, 21 11:08 pm  · 
2  · 
x-jla

That salsa will have mfers thinking they have covid the next day...my esophagus feels like I ate fire ants.

1  · 
Wood Guy

There's only one flavor you taste on both its way in and its way out...

 · 
apscoradiales

One of the benefits of retirement.

You get to cook your own lunch; it's much yummier and cheaper than eating out all the time while working.

Garlic pasta...lots of olive oil, some hot pepper seeds, parsley, cherry tomatoes, and linguine with some spaghetti.

Jan 22, 21 3:39 pm  · 
2  · 
Wood Guy

Mixing linguine with spaghetti? My Sicilian FIL would roll in his grave! Looks beautiful, though.

 · 
apscoradiales

Pasta and "saft".

Rigatone,

"Saft"....beef stew pieces, chicken legs, onions, garlic, celery, carrots, chicken broth, parsley, salt, pepper, hot pepper seeds, paprika...

Jan 27, 21 3:23 pm  · 
1  · 

I mastered how to make hot and sour soup since my favorite place to eat it is closed due to covid. I do it faster than and am less fussy. I use beef stock. no egg. But never cut short apple cider, hot sauce, vinegar, and soy sauce. It's really great in cold weather. There are tons of guide videos, pick your pick.

Jan 29, 21 4:31 pm  · 
4  · 
citizen

Even the culinary-challenged can muster something decent, if simple.


Feb 4, 21 4:13 pm  · 
2  · 
x-jla


Grilled chicken asada tacos, homemade salsa with fire roasted peppers, tomatoes, lime, etc...
Feb 4, 21 11:20 pm  · 
3  · 
curtkram

if only your political and cultural views could rise to the level of your tacos....

 · 
citizen

^ Wrong thread.

1  · 
Wood Guy

Yeah let's try to keep this a place where we all share a love of food and/or cooking. I have to get bloodwork tomorrow morning so no dinner tonight--these posts are making my stomach growl!

1  · 
x-jla


lunch for my son...beats school lunch 



Feb 5, 21 5:24 pm  · 
1  · 
tduds

My sister-in-law is a professional chef. For my birthday this year she got me a slick boning knife - and with it came a lesson in breaking down whole chickens. We had a couple brews and turned about 10 birds into parts + stock.

I feel like I've gained a new superpower.

Feb 8, 21 2:06 pm  · 
5  · 
citizen

Oh, the avianity!     ;o]

1  · 

I took a home-economics-style course in high school (don't recall the name other than it was not "home ec," but essentially the same without the stigma of the name). Cooking was part of it and we learned hands-on how to cut up a whole chicken as part of the course. I remember enough of it to agree with the superpower feeling, but I'd have to get a refresher on it if I wanted to wield the power properly.

 · 
Wood Guy

Ooh, nice knife! That's one thing on my wish list. I have a good quality Henkels boning knife but it's lightweight, made more for fish I think. My world opened up when YouTube taught me how to break down chickens! I love knowing *just* where to put the knife to separate the leg, etc.. Need more practice, though.

1  · 
tduds

The leg joint hack is amazing! There's a litlte bit there that you'd think was a bone, but no! Just poke it with the knife tip and the whole thing falls right off.

1  · 
tduds

That & different ways of using gravity to make cuts pull away (rather than using extra force with the knife) were the best lessons of the day.

1  · 
x-jla

Slow and low...slow and low...some Sunday gravy in the pot yesterday...10 hours....very very rich.  San Marzano tomatoes, pork ribs, chops, sausage...eventually served over rigatoni, paramsean, and fresh basil (was too busy eating to take pics)

Feb 8, 21 6:47 pm  · 
 · 
tduds

From a few days back: Tortilla Soup. It's all about the toppings (and the beer pairing of course).

Feb 8, 21 6:57 pm  · 
4  · 
x-jla

my son did good on test, so gets his favorite...rib eye tacos, Mexican Au jus, cilantro, limes...and some for me too   




Feb 9, 21 1:44 pm  · 
3  · 
x-jla


valentine dinner, salmon, asparagus, basil purée, saffron rice. 

Feb 14, 21 8:57 pm  · 
3  · 
tduds

I cook a fancy dinner twice a year for my wife - on the anniversary of our first date in November, and Valentine's Day. This year I thought it'd be fun to seek inspiration in an older tradition. Her being the pagan-loving tree-hugging hippie she is (& also an Irish redhead), I took queues from the old Celtic festival of Imbolc, which occurs around the 1st-2nd of February. Had a lot of fun researching historic and local ingredients & recipes, and she was absolutely wowed by the theme. Great success!

Not pictured: A gin + lemon cocktail to kick things off.

The main: Lamb shank braised in milk + herbs. Celeriac and pea shoot "Colcannon" with thyme + caraway. Onion + parsnip cream.

Dessert: Rosemary bannoch w/ lavender Meyer Lemon curd. Garnished with dried Lavender and Marigolds.

Feb 18, 21 7:26 pm  · 
6  · 
Non Sequitur

Lemon curd pastries is the fastest way to get into my pants.

3  · 
x-jla

Looks beautiful

 · 
Wood Guy

Man you're on another level. And I'm with Non on lemon curd pastries.

 · 
citizen

Applied with a spatula or serving spoon, Non?

1  · 
x-jla


not much of a breakfast person, but was craving this, so made some before my site visit:)

Feb 19, 21 12:00 pm  · 
3  · 
x-jla

Tomatoes, onion, poblanos, lime, ancho chilli powder, salt, pepper, cumin for the sauce...then I like to remove sauce from pan, put some olive oil without washing it, and fry some corn tortillas gives them good flavor...and some fried jalapeños to wake me up. Get the corn tortillas from a great little local Mexican market...

1  · 
x-jla




Barbacoa....

Feb 20, 21 4:04 pm  · 
1  · 

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