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GRE Cancelled for most MArch degrees

KingGizzard

Hi all, 

Just wanted to start a small discussion about the cancellation of the GRE exams for most schools, most notably Harvard GSD, Yale SoA, MIT, and many others. What could be the reasons other than covid-19? and how could this affect the admissions process? 


 
Sep 15, 20 3:41 pm
monosierra

Says on the GSD website TOEFL and GRE are still required. But if they are scrapped, I imagine its Covid's effects on testing centers. GPA in the context of the applicant's college would have to stand in to evaluate academic potential entirely. Portfolio still counts for the bulk of admission assessment though. Grades are really just there to make sure the applicants meet a minimum threshold befitting of whatever school they're applying to. I suspect architecture school applicants are not as competitive as medical, law, and business school applicants when it comes to grades alone.

Sep 15, 20 4:01 pm  · 
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KingGizzard

Actually, GSD cancelled the GRE for all their programs except for a specific concentration of MDes https://www.gsd.harvard.edu/admissions/apply/

1  · 
monosierra

You're roght - "At this time, the change to the GRE requirement is for the 2021 application season only."

1  · 
Jay1122

"I suspect architecture school applicants are not as competitive as medical, law, and business school applicants".Get rid of the grade part. Those degrees actually worth the $$, their field rewards them with big $$ after going to Harvard. What are you gonna do with GSD degree after 200K in debt other than cockiness. Working as an intern with 40-50K salary doing the endless change design diagrams/egress stair details like everyone else.

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monosierra

Hahaha well put. I’d add that some folks go there to get into the teaching business or have a better shot at a fancy starchitect practice. After all, the faculty usually hires their own students ... it’s a tight group. Same goes for career paths that involve winning the League Prize or getting nominated for the PS1 pavilion (RIP to that one) - where who-you-know may matter more than what-you-know. 

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Jay1122

"better shot at a fancy starchitect practice" I honestly would tread carefully with those. Although i have not worked for them, but i have heard stories. Most of the time as a low level interns they just work you like a tool. You may spend months doing physical models for their design. 3 years down the line, you may still not know how to properly document a building. Except excellent diagrams and physical modeling skills.I want to say rendering too but usually mediocre work.They outsource final one to visualization firm. Of course not always the case, but certainly exists. A medium sized no specific name firm doing LEED BOX is my favorite.

1  · 
monosierra

Its a good point though there are some "starchitect" firms that dive deep into the nitty gritty bits of construction depending on the project and the business model they operate. In many cases, you are quite right: the CD stage (or even DD) would be handed off to a more experienced AOR that would develop the design into reality. The smaller "star" practice is hired to come up with design that the AOR (supposedly) cannot produce, despite its stellar technical credentials. Ideally its a marriage of equals under the supervision of the client (or CM if the contract works that way). Heck, you see this relationship even with the bigger firms with celebrity principals - working with strong technical teams at the likes of Gensler. The division of labor has its downsides I guess - a fresh graduate who remains in musical chairs between acronym firms (UN, OMA, BIG, DSR ... and their smaller cousins) may never have to go too deep into ADA compliance or the finer details of facade design. They produce the colorful diagrams, the big ideas for opera houses and occasional parti for condos, and perhaps the odd detail or two of a newfangled facade concept. The split between Design and Technical an unfortunate necessity with projects at a large and complex scale.

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Jay1122

Well that is why one of my favorite architect is Renzo Piano, working from big concept down to every detail. In an interview, he said his team is involved from start to end. Now that is the starchitect firm to join.

1  · 

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