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What do you think of this floor plan I have made?


It's a luxury house for a country with a cold climate where you have summer all year round because you have a winter garden with a swimming pool in it. 


I'm from Sweden so I know what it's like in a dark and cold place. :-)

 
Sep 13, 20 11:32 am

I don't know how to have the windows on the side thought. 

Maybe it feels too far away from the outside and view from the living room looking through the winter garden. But at the same time I don't know how symmetric it should be and what looks best...

Witch one do you think is best?



Alternative 1



Alternative 2



Alternative 3



Alternative 4



Alternative 5




Sep 13, 20 12:09 pm  · 
1  · 
Non Sequitur

they all look dreadful. 

Sep 13, 20 1:21 pm  · 
1  ·  1

I just love constructive criticism.

2  · 
Non Sequitur

It was constructive. Burn it down and start over but this time, try to put an effort in making a semi-livable space instead of a neat arrangement of boxes like an Ikea sales floor.

2  · 
curtkram

it's all one lineweight.  don't do that.  you need a different font.  i'm not sure what's going on with the bed, but it isn't right.

Sep 13, 20 1:36 pm  · 
 ·  1
SneakyPete

Those aren't beds, they're giant peices of intermittent blocking.

4  · 
Non Sequitur

I’m a big fan of using patio furniture for door stops.

1  ·  1

What is lineweight? What do you mean?

What is it you don't like with the beds...?

 · 

Non Sequitur if you are fat you might have to open both doors all the way or use the other doors. Or you can sit on a sofa for two there, by yourself (if you are that fat I mean).

 · 
rcz1001

thickness of lines on the drawings. Read: https://www.lifeofanarchitect.com/architectural-graphics-101-line-weight/

 · 
rcz1001

CAD drawings can have various set line weights. (Line thickness if you want to think about it that way) In the old days of ruling pens, lines were not exact measured widths because the ruling pens operate on a little knob that widens or tightens the little tines. There were 2-3 types of ruling pens used. One of them being the Swedish detail ruling pen and were used for detail drawings which often used thicker lines and that would require more ink. 

Then came along the "technical pens" with exact thickness of tips. They were basically precision cylindrical tip fountain pens largely beginning in the 1950s/60s. 

By the 1980s and 1990s when computers came out and CAD programs emerged, line weight was drawn directly from the technical pen era and in fact old plotters in those days were pen plotters and actually used technical pens. Eventually, these plotters became essentially glorified wide form factor inkjet printers and replaced pens with ink cartridges so they are really a printer but the tradition of lines with specified thicknesses are used. 

There are basic semi-standardized drafting practices for what line weight to use and when to use certain line weights in the drawing. Often, you'll be using between 3-6 line weights on architectural drawing or sheet of drawings. There isn't an absolute single right way to do this but there are common standards which you should be familiar if you want to increase your skills and eventually become an 'architect' in Sweden but there is a lot of other things you need to learn as well.

 · 

rcz1001 and curtkram: But should not the walls between outside and inside be thicker than the walls between rooms?

 · 
rcz1001

The wall thickness may be thicker especially if the exterior wall is physically thicker than the interior walls which they usually are. However, line weight has nothing to do with thickness of wall in an actual technical drawing. When you do a napkin sketch with a sharpie where you use one line to represent walls then yeah, a thicker line but in technical drawings like construction documents, an exterior wall or any wall is represented in much more detail involving multiple lines from the lines representing the siding or brick face (if brick facing is used), plywood sheets thickness, etc. There is a lot more detail in that and you can see that in actual construction documents which may even indicate insulation in the walls. Those drawings where you see single solid lines representing walls and they vary in thickness for an exterior wall and an interior wall is because they are a concept sketch drawing usually done in early design phases before you get into the more detail drawings that would be used to get permits and for use by builders to build the building. These early sketches represent a different purpose for communication with a client especially if you are going to go through multiple iterations and showing multiple proposals of concepts to a project requirements that the design professional receives from the client like number of bedrooms, sizes of rooms, and relationship of rooms (function areas), orientation, etc. In architecture speak, we call that "architectural program". Then we come up with multiple ideas or concepts and sketch them into concept drawings.

 · 
rcz1001

I know houses where the exterior walls and interior walls uses the same size studs but exterior walls still tended to be a little thicker due to sheathing and interior (drywall, plaster, etc.) and exterior finish (siding, stucco, brick, etc.). In parts of Sweden, the exterior wall may need to be even more thicker for thickness of insulation in the walls that are part of managing heat loss in a cold climate akin to Alaska (US), Yukon/British Columbia (Canada), where there are mountains and lots of snow and ice, long winters, and so forth.

 · 
archi_dude

From the GC side. We couldn't care less about the line weights. Coordinate the l

 · 
archi_dude

The plans with your consultants and make sure the schedules are copied and pasted. No one cares about lineweights!

 · 
rcz1001

Never mind..... second thought. It's just a hobbyist learning slowly to design.


Sep 13, 20 2:53 pm  · 
1  · 
rcz1001

How about buy this book for inspiration: http://miltonstricker.com (available on Amazon) and blend it with Swedish architectural tradition and consideration for climate of the area. Adapt the plan for how Swedish people live that may differ than the American domestic tradition. If possible, learn from the book about a way of design thinking. There are more sources you can draw from but it is something I would consider for drawing from nature and context to arrive at a design.

 · 

Is this forum just for professional architects? In that case I will leave.

 · 
rcz1001

Not necessarily but this forum is customarily and intended to be used primarily by those who are professional "architects" (often seeking licensure to do projects where licensure is required). There are people on this forum at various levels. In Sweden, licensure isn't required to practice architecture but you shouldn't design homes or any building for clients without gaining the knowledge and skills to competently do so. If you are interested in gaining the knowledge and skills to competently design houses in Sweden, I don't think anyone has an issue with that. Respect those with professional experience and in cases on this forum, licensure. It can be challenging at time for some individuals and some of the 'in-fighting' of sorts that happens but I think you would want to avoid some of that non-sense banter that happens here.

This is an internet forum with users from around the world and many countries have licensing requirements to become an architect, practice architecture, and use the architect title in practice. There are exceptions for unlicensed persons to design some types of buildings (exempt buildings - often houses are among the 'exempt'). In Sweden, they may still be called architects but in the U.S., alternative titles are often used by unlicensed persons who designs these 'exempt buildings'. (Exempt buildings for sake of conversation means buildings that does not require a licensed architect to design and stamp). In Sweden, there is no licensing. There is a professional association that issues a credential and some local jurisdictions may want plans prepared by those individuals. 

1  · 
newbie.Phronesis

Tbh from how circulation and amenities are laid out, looks like a hostel or ski chalet more than house. But for a first attempt and hobby it's better than some I've seen...

For living room side, make it all triple-glazed window wall if there's a nice view.

Sep 13, 20 3:51 pm  · 
 · 

Why triple-glazed window for the the view? I don't understand, sorry.

 · 
rcz1001

control heat-loss

1  · 

Aha, so it has nothing to do with view, just that there is a lot of windows when there is a nice view. :-)

1  · 
rcz1001

Whether you use double-pane or triple-pane windows depends on climate and rate of heat loss. There's a bit of math involved. Sweden is a good sized country and the climate condition varies from southern Sweden to northern Sweden. With a lot of windows, you may need triple-pane to mitigate the amount of heat loss.

I recommend you read and learn from this book: (While it is U.S. based, you can apply principles of passive solar design in Sweden)

https://gofile.io/d/VGPp28

You may need to adjust for your latitude for a project location and I would recommend a combination of geothermal and passive solar energy in the design if it was me. While the book is date a little, you can still apply the principles and make adjustments with newer information but the science and principles haven't changed and there are additional resources out there on the subject matter.


 · 
rcz1001

In regards to the first drawing, I would red flag the garage over the hobby room/storage/bathroom cluster and have a conversation with you and asking you to explain how you plan to design and engineer the floor system to support the weight of a car and how the load paths are going to be determined. If the floor is not adequately designed and engineered to support the load, that car is going to find its way the hobby room.

I would inverse the hobby room and storage and bathroom to the second floor level and put the garage on the lower level. I can use just a 6-inch thick reinforced concrete slab on top of 18" of adequate base material under the slab. As it is, right now, I would have to use reinforced concrete floor deck supported by reinforced concrete joists at 12" o.c. between concrete beams 2-ft. deep @ 6-feet (or 2 meters) on-center and a center line concrete beam 2-ft x 3 feet deep with 20-inch x 20-inch or 20-inch diameter reinforced concrete columns every 6-feet on-center. Alternatively, I would have to use heavy timber beams (and timber or steel posts) or glulam beams and post (posts alternatively being steel or reinforced concrete) system supporting a CLT floor deck with a 4-inch thick reinforced concrete top to provide adequate non-combustible surface which the car is on.

In short, it would cost more to make the above ground floor 3+ meters above the ground to support the weight of cars, pickup trucks, etc. than it would be if it was on ground grade with a concrete slab. 

What you proposed would come at a significant increase in price. If you were doing this for a client, the client might not be too happy with the increase in cost. They have finite budget. A design professional has an implied duty to respect the client's budget and if possible come up with a design solution that meets the budget assuming the client's budget is realistic and what they want and need is realistic. Otherwise, we have to be forthright and candid that what they want and their budget is a mismatch.

Sep 13, 20 4:02 pm  · 
1  · 

Thank you for the info. This is just my silly little hobby, I fantasize that I'm rich and can build as expensive as I want. :-) I would never draw for anyone in reality.

Do you mean that the garage would be in the basement? That's not possible you know.

 · 
rcz1001

First, I would have laid out the floor plan differently as it is awkward from any sort of domestic layout even in Sweden. If it was me, I would have the hobby room on a third-level (attic/loft) with dormers if you are using a gable or hip roof type. I would then not have a basement level hobby-room, bathroom & storage and leave the basement under the main part of the dwelling as it and have fill and slab on grade for the garage floor and wall foundation to frost depth for it's footing as needed. We can use more modest beams every 2.5 meters (or 8-ft.) o.c. (top/down) spanning across the garage (left to right) at sufficient height where the bottom of beam is 12-ft. above the highest point on the garage floor. Then you can have stout floor joists between or on-top of the glulam beams. The sidewalls of the garage would be bearing walls so they would need to be strong and stout. The trick is to figure out a path for stairway going to attic/loft level. Others may already have an idea how I might implement such a stairway based on your layout with modifications but I'll let you try to think out how so we're not outright telling you how to do it.

 · 
midlander

luxury houses have bigger bedrooms with windows. this is a functional but very strange house.

Sep 13, 20 4:16 pm  · 
1  ·  1

Do you really think the bedrooms have no windows?!?

 · 

Maybe I can change the balcony so the rooms on the first floor get's more light... 

Sep 13, 20 4:46 pm  · 
 · 
Non Sequitur

daylight is overrated. Dark damp cave feeling is all the rage these days.

1  ·  1
Jay1122

Another guy that shows up to design critic review with only floor plans. Seriously what are you looking to get feedback on with only floor plans? The layout of rooms? Well they work as long as you can move through them and meet basic codes and function needs. Some will like it, some will hate it. Some will think it is too small, some will think it is a waste of space. It is just opinions, and layout does not even matter that much. I've seen all sorts of weird shits in houses published in magazine and online, anything flies. Seriously work a lot more than floor plan layouts and then ask for critiques and opinions. I liked the Rammed earth wall guy, at least he has a set vision and specific work to critique. You need to consider overall form, construction, fenestration, finishes, etc.

Sep 13, 20 5:45 pm  · 
2  ·  1

I asked for opinions here because I'm in the middle of drawing it, so have not come to drawing it in 3D yet... it's all just about the floor plan so far, but it's not hard to imagen what a 2D drawing will look like in 3D, just not the details.

 · 
Jay1122

"not hard to imagen what a 2D drawing will look like in 3D" Ya, and it will turn out to be just like every other boring boxes that does not get a second glance. If it is your dream house, dream bigger. Man, that is what annoys me, people always thought architecture design is about layout the room and draw the floor plan and then extrude it into boxes. Honestly, the layout is fine other than that first floor/basement thing. Is the 2nd floor actually on the grade so the living room is there? But there is outdoor space and windows on first floor/basement, so is it a sloped site? If it is sloped site, site plan and section is a must. Hey it would be cool if it is a level site, and you dig a giant hole on the ground for the pool and garden and build retaining walls around. And i honestly do no see anything luxury other than tightly cramped rooms.

1  · 
rcz1001

One of the first things to do is have a topographical survey. This helps with site planning which in turn helps with the section and elevation (draft elevation... initially without big concern about final details). The design iteration between plan view, elevation view, section views, site, etc. all interplays. All is important because we are working with a 3d object on a site, not just a 2d object with a vague site location. If I don't have an accurate topography, I would conform the site with excavation/fill for the garage and then the rest can be adjusted on post/pier foundation and wall. 

In a real project, a land/topographical surveyor is almost a must for getting a usable topographical survey and marking property boundary. If a good topographical surveys have been done before, then we might not need a new topographical survey. A good one would be in 0.5 meter contour increments but a 0.2m increment could work as well. Not necessarily as critical for "academic" (just for fun) work.

 · 
apscoradiales

You are trying to do too much. Organise your thoughts. Organise your needs - must have; would be nice to have. Also, think in 3d.

Best thing to do for you would be to hire an architect who will do that.

Sometimes architects are their own worst client; they try to squeeze all the good stuff they've seen into their own house. Some architects hire another to help them design a place. I did that one time for my boss; worked out OK.

Sep 13, 20 5:54 pm  · 
1  ·  1
Non Sequitur

The OP is just a dreamer laymen having fun in sketchup... but, as you put it, this concept would benefit greatly from something 3D. A section of that deep balcony should reveal very quickly why placing all those skinny bedrooms below is a bad idea.

 · 
randomised

That’s some quality trolling OP,!

Sep 13, 20 6:19 pm  · 
 · 

Thank you.

1  · 
rcz1001

I think for some, the biggest problem some people have is some people come here seeking a bunch of architectural services to effectively design their home without having to pay them anything. 

As long as this is basically academic and you aren't actually building this as is and is willing to hire a professional to design from initial consultation and work with you through the design process for the final design, most won't have a problem. 

At some point, we would be investing time and accruing professional liability exposure which we would as professionals want to be paid because we have to safeguard ourselves with liability insurance and that comes at a cost. Working for free doesn't pay the bills and insurance is a bill.


 ·  1
rcz1001

I'm just mentioning about some of the regulars here. There has been quite a few individuals on this forum that sought a bunch of freebie service which effectively is getting all the services of a professional without paying for it. There maybe individuals on this forum that may be willing to provide professional services but it would come with a price. We are talking about a sizable commitment of time, money, and professional liability exposure, etc. For example, I could provide design services for houses in Sweden but I wouldn't be doing it for free. Biggest challenge right now would be site visiting and that's an international flight and travel which is kind of an iffy these days with COVD-19.

 · 
Jay1122

guy already said it is his hobby. He is imagining his dream house if he is so rich. I actually would recommend every architect to do this exercise. Imagine your dream house when money is not that tight, you will discover what you really care about in your work and design philosophy. But of course, real architects knows more than OP. And would actually consider wall assembly types, glazing options, roof assembly types and details, FF&E, lighting, Mechanical system. Room layout and square footage? whatever you want, as long as you got the moolah. Made me think of the luxury miami house with 50 ft span living room constructed using truss system. 

3  · 
rcz1001

Don't disagree. My point is as long as this is basically 'academic' as in not actually being built for real and if there was a time that the OP is ready to build a dream house that he is willing to hire an architect, I don't think it is an issue. 

To think of it, Jay, it isn't really a bad exercise. Since we're here, I'll dabble with the exercise with Sweden as a project location. I can play this exercise with almost anywhere.

 · 
randomised

Don’t rich people like truffles? Dream house —>
https://www.ensamble.info/thetruffle

 · 
tintt

I need to see some 3D, some perspectives, inside and out, do you have any?

Sep 13, 20 7:32 pm  · 
1  · 
rcz1001

I think we'll have to wait because the person is nowhere near that at this time.

 · 
Jay1122

nah, you will never see it. he will soon get tired of this hobby and call it a day. If you ask me, I need to see some finished realistic rendering of the space. It is all line drawing paper talk until you put it in real rendered perspective. VR rendering is even better, i did some realistic VR rendering of my dream house, it is absolutely awesome when paired with realistic rendering. And fire it up in Enscape for a quick virtual tour is a good idea during design, you can discover awkward stuff in first person perspective during walk through.

1  ·  1

tintt: Not yet.

 · 
tintt

You don't need photorealistic, just some sketches of what the space feels like in 3D. Proportions, views, flow. There's a saying, the map is not the territory.

1  · 
DTL.DWG

so Sauna's are like closets just off the main hallway?  Don't you usually go in the Sauna and then jump in the water, but to do that you would have to go through someone's bedroom or a TV room? 

Sep 13, 20 7:53 pm  · 
 · 
rcz1001

Not all Swedes do the sauna thing but it was something I was noticed was not in the drawings in the original post.

 · 
b3tadine[sutures]

Looks like a barracks, for Waffen SS.

Sep 13, 20 11:56 pm  · 
 ·  1

Maybe this is better. I added a second floor (which I had from the beginning actually, but this time with a little different floor plan).

Sep 14, 20 1:46 am  · 
1  ·  1
b3tadine[sutures]

Like I stated earlier, Waffen SS barracks, you've nailed it, now move on to Der Führer's bunker.

1  ·  1
Non Sequitur

Straight lines would help.

1  · 

It's of course just a very simple sketch at first, I will draw it in 3D in SketchUp later.

 ·  1
Non Sequitur

try drawing a perspective view from the exterior. That's ten times more important than moving tiny rooms around.

3  · 

Of course, but I am working on the floor plan first this time. It's not that complicated idea of a house, so I don't have to think THAT much about the exterior at first. At least that's what I think.

 ·  2
Non Sequitur

You are grossly incorrect. work both perspective and plan AT the same time. Orientation is also a giant factor and your plans are just slight variations of the same tired grid arrangement. Give it some life for fucks' sake. It's just so dreadful.

 · 

I can see it in 3D in my head while I'm working on the floor plan when it comes to this house. And I like the simple style.

 · 
Non Sequitur

I doubt you can. If you could actually visualize it, you would réalise why this is dreadful. Very obvious. Also, simple style is difficult. What you "like" here is not simple, it's minimal effort style.

1  ·  1

...I think I should have two stairs to the balcony though. Since I made the balcony deeper now it fits, and makes it more symmetric.

Sep 14, 20 2:42 am  · 
 ·  1

I'm so happy I managed to fix the problem! :-D

Sep 14, 20 8:25 am  · 
 ·  1

You fixed nothing.

 · 

I will move one of the bedroom to the side of the other bedrooms (on top of the page), so there is no bedroom above the master bedroom on the entrance floor so the kids don't have to hear the parents fuck.

Sep 14, 20 8:35 am  · 
 ·  1
b3tadine[sutures]

Yeah, but did Adolf really fuck Eva, or was it the other way around? Food for thought.

1  · 

Thank's for all the advice people!

Sep 14, 20 9:04 am  · 
 · 

Bad troll is bad at trolling.  

Sep 14, 20 10:42 am  · 
2  ·  1
JLC-1

have you ever seen a luxury house like this anywhere? look around kid, this "hobby" is learned by observing the world.

Sep 14, 20 12:17 pm  · 
 · 

I have made a new version now. 

Now you don't have to look through the winter garden when you want to look at the view from the living room.

Sep 14, 20 5:58 pm  · 
 · 
rcz1001

Ok, you put the garage back over the top of the hobby room. 

What scale of sort are you working from for each grid on the graph paper? 

Would be helpful at some point to consider since there is no stated scale or graphic scale to base on. When I do these kinds of drawings, I kind of base something like 1 grid equal 1-ft. x 1'ft. or 3-ft. x 3-ft. or 4-ft. x 4ft. You might use the meter unit. 1 square equal 1-meter x 1 meter or something. 

This way, I have some sense of spatial volume that I am needing to meet. In designing buildings for clients, each room or function area has some size that would need to be met per our agreement in project program and dialogue. Therefore, I would want to be sure the room is adequately sized. It is part of space planning but it's not just the plans but also the elevations and other views that are all happening concurrently in the design process because we go back and forth between the different views (plan view, elevation views, section views, etc.).

Others have said similarly.

 · 
b3tadine[sutures]

I liked it better as a barracks. It was radical! Just thinking about it! I went back and looked at Inglorious Bastards, Force Ten From Navarone, Saving Private Ryan and The Brady Bunch! I was getting thirsty! Drat.

 · 
Non Sequitur

Rotate the 2nd floor 90d counter-clockwise and put an empty and inaccessible storey between it and the ground floor. Perfect

1  · 
tduds

SECOND PLOOR

 · 
rcz1001

To further develop your architectural sketching skills to enhance you visualization in 3d on paper consider buying a copy this book and/or some of the other books by Francis D.K. Ching. 

https://www.amazon.com/Design-...

You will have to have it mailed to you. Practice what the book provides and some of the others. There are some reference material but ultimately, it takes practicing.

Sep 14, 20 8:12 pm  · 
1  · 
rcz1001

Mr. Ching's books are often required or highly suggested reading material in architecture school courses. Especially in early part of architecture school curriculum. His building codes illustrated and building construction illustrated are reading material found in courses relating to building codes and building construction usually in the more intermediate level instruction around mid-point of the degree.

 · 

You can divide the hobby room in two if you really want to.

Sep 15, 20 2:16 am  · 
 · 
natematt

I have no experience with this so take it with a grain of salt, but it seems like a bad idea to put a Jacuzzi fully under an enclosed overhang like that.

I can't imagine that all the moisture evaporating upward would be good for any normal soffit material or related assembly and may cause issues over time with heavy use. And even if you do avoid any damage, you are likely to have a really bad problem with the indoor balcony glass fogging up in that area. 

Sep 15, 20 2:49 am  · 
 · 
SneakyPete

On the upside, chlorinated mushroom burgers!

1  · 
archinine
So many doors, is there a heard of animals going into the pool room? Also probably don’t need windows in the basement looking out onto solid earth.

On a lighter note, aside from the many obvious fallacies of the space planning and usability in this...layout, I actually love the general concept of a year round temperate atrium like space that is heated naturally by geothermal or an underlying hot spring etc. Which, reading between the lines, I believe might be the OP’s aim for which he’s not got the vocabulary.

Conceptually it makes me think of Peter Zumthor. His bath house is an indoor wet space, dark, cavernous yet boxy and modernist. When writing it in a sentence that sounds disgusting and like a magnet for black mold but the Zumthor work is quite beautiful and clean in execution. I recommend OP research this work and other existing works which conceptually address their interests and ideas for the concept.

The best plans start with a clear overall concept, not arranging boxes on paper. Hence the dual meaning of the word ‘plan’

Given the two story atrium component, a section including the ground/earth location relative to the building would be helpful to further the thinking of the idea.
Sep 15, 20 1:15 pm  · 
1  · 
rcz1001

If the OP (user by name of Hobby Architect) could get a general angle of the ground terrain as it is currently so we get and approximately indicate it in an exterior elevation view. I suspect the ground slopes downhill from bottom of page (sometimes called "Plan South") to top of page (sometimes called "Plan North") direction. I don't know which is north or south. If the OP indicates on plans which direction is north, south, east, and west, it will communicate a bit. 

Hobby "Architect", do not assume we know which is north, east, west, or south. While we could assume from common practice, because you are not a professional architect but a hobbyist non-architect designing your own dream home, we are best not to assume. Just indicate it somewhere. A simple cross with an arrow point with north indicated and we can extrapolate the orientation of the plans and it would make talking about this easier. I've seen plans where the site plan (for example) had the arrow to north facing the bottom of the page. Yes, it happens. We can't assume non-"professionals" adhere to standard or common conventions of the architectural profession.

 · 
Almosthip

Hobby Architect

Sep 15, 20 4:24 pm  · 
1  · 
Almosthip

Please don't swing your bathroom doors into the path of travel

Sep 15, 20 4:26 pm  · 
1  · 

I guess you don't like this version either, but if you removed the winder garden, would it be ok then? Then it would be quite traditional I guess.

Sep 16, 20 3:21 am  · 
 · 
Jay1122

You still haven't addressed the site issue. Is that ground level below grade.If so the garden should be surrounded by retaining walls, use thick bold line. And its polycarbonate or curtainwall assembly for second and third? AKA greenhouse. What kind of framing system are you going to use to support the two story glazing and the assumed glazed roof. You need to show the structure. I actually love that idea but that thing will probably cost 1/4 of the house if you do steel framing and high quality curtain wall.If you do main structure frame with sub frames, its cheaper but you get a lot of sub framing dividing the glazing. And remember, snows. On the third floor, A balcony with the width of a single door swing. Seriously? Why even bother to construct that. The garage that sticks out, it should have its on slab on grade foundation, i would construct that portion as non insulated or low insulated. Run your main insulation along the core central box with continuity from below and above. Honestly i would get rid of the stick out garage, make it detached with a corridor connect back to main building or something. So the remaining is a clear half solid and half glazed box, much cleaner in design concept.That is why you need 3D models, you have to get a feeling from outside view.

 · 
Non Sequitur

it's almost like you've never seen a house design. mass-produced developer suburban houses have more character than this.

 · 
Jay1122

It is one of these stacked program extruded boring box architecture school tries have students to avoid. That garage stick to the side simply due to program requirement. It is just so boring with different program layouts. You may not believe it, architecture school does teach something. Creativity is important. Only that fully glazed garden is unusual. But that thing will cost an arm and leg while doing not much. I would cap that glazing at the balcony. Let the 2nd and 3rd be outdoor space to save cost. It also does not do much extending above the ground level. I doubt he will have proper knowledge about construction and cost. Or how to make the design match the money spent.

 · 

Think I'm gonna put in an elevator in this one as well, in the storage.
https://www.pinterest.se/pin/571605377709783542


What do you guys think of this house then?https://hobbyarchitect.wixsite.com/architect/magic-villa

(Only simple sketches so far.)


Sep 16, 20 4:03 pm  · 
 · 
Non Sequitur

Try a trébuche instead.

 · 
Jay1122

is this the newer version? This looks like a proper luxury house. WTH happened in between? You took some drugs? It is wasteful but its all imaginary money anyway.

 · 
Non Sequitur

It's another fantasy project from the wanker's personal blog site.

 · 
Jay1122

This i dig more than that boring box. It has the wasteful characteristic of those luxurious modern Beverly hills houses. But honestly enough with the floor plans,you have finished 5% of the luxury house design.Time to move on. Now i want to see the real luxurious stuff. The high end doors, exterior/interior wall finishes(Clads?Panels?), roof assembly(Green roof? Paved Roof?), storefront systems(operable Nana wall?), custom mill works, Custom counters, chandeliers, light fixtures, appliances, etc. Hit me with some of the realistic detailed renderings depicting your vision. You can't keep circling around with various plan layouts.

 · 
tduds

Love to check on my storage while I eat dinner.

 · 
Jay1122

I would love to build a house with all these wasteful corners and offsets. All those roof bases and edges require proper flashing.The roof itself requires extra material and coverage. All the wall turns require extra construction attention. Probably can get a nice Ferrari or 2 with those extra money spent .I am just too cheap.

 · 
Almosthip7

Too many doors

 · 
tduds

This thread is a perfect case study in the difference between Architecture and Floor Plans.

Sep 16, 20 4:57 pm  · 
1  · 
tduds

On one hand, the floor plans themselves aren't great. On the other hand, even if they were the inattention to elevation & section (AKA the dimensions in which humans actually experience a building) result in a shitty building.

 · 
rcz1001

elevator in storage room? WTF?

Sep 17, 20 1:47 am  · 
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