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Understanding Floor Plan Dimensions

oyiwaanoela

Hello,

I am new here, and I hope I am posting in the right forum. 

I am not an architect, but a consumer trying to understand an architectural floor plan.

Specifically, I want to understand what the various numbers on the sides of the floor plan mean - How do I figure out the dimensions of the rooms from the floor plan.  For example, how wide is the living room, porch, etc.  What is the length and width of the building.  I am hoping once I can figure out one, I should be able to get the others.

Attached is the floor plan

Thanks in advance for your assistance

 
Jun 29, 20 12:05 pm
Non Sequitur

Simple math will help.  Add the string of dimensions for whatever room you want and boom, your get basic total X by Y dimensions.


Jun 29, 20 12:08 pm  · 
 · 
oyiwaanoela

OK ... there are 3 lines of dimensions, with varying levels of closeness to the building from the outer boundary. 

So which one do you use? the first one closest to the building? So for the porch, do you 75mm, then 4950, 2250 and 2400?

And secondly, what are the units - I am thinking millimeters..

cheers, Oy

Jun 29, 20 12:12 pm  · 
 · 
Non Sequitur

yes and yes. very simple

1  · 
citizen

Metric. Sheesh.

 · 
citizen

And dimensions are all to centerlines, meaning that you'll need to deduct wall thickness if you need more precise room sizes.

Jun 29, 20 12:55 pm  · 
 · 
Non Sequitur

secondary line of dims includes wall thickness

 · 
citizen

Ah. Good catch!

 · 
gwharton

The light dashed lines running across the plans are construction grid lines, which look like they are located in the center lines of walls. So to get the actual clear room dimensions (or what we call "carpet area"), you'll need to add up the dimensions between the grid lines between the walls for a room, then subtract out half the thickness of the wall.

Jun 29, 20 12:57 pm  · 
 · 
atelier nobody

Tangential question for those of you who regularly use unamerican units: Is it typical to see dimensions all in millimetres like this, or would you more commonly see major building dimensions in meters with decimal?

Jun 29, 20 4:27 pm  · 
 · 
Non Sequitur

always mm.

edit.  unless it's a site plan.  then it's in m because writing 27890mm is ridiculous when 28m is good enough for SPA review.

4  · 
atelier nobody

Thanks, NS, good to know.

 · 
frankkeane

Check this article - https://www.houseplans.com/blo... and good luck!

Jul 2, 20 3:29 am  · 
 · 
justavisual

Architectural drawings in mm always, landscape in m. And 27890mm would probably be shown as 27,89m not 28 :)

Jul 2, 20 5:08 am  · 
 · 
Non Sequitur

27.9m.

1  · 
Non Sequitur

;-)

 · 
Almosthip

that decimal point gets tricky

2  · 
justavisual

Haha well its also hard if you dont know we use commas and decimal points the other way around in Europe:

In America its 9,100.00 and in Europe the same amount is 9.100,00

Jul 2, 20 12:00 pm  · 
1  · 

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