Archinect
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To the 'Burbs

Volunteer

There is an article in the WSJ today about city dwellers who rent apartments in high-rise buildings are bailing out and renting houses in the 'burbs. The article also implies that portions of the work-from-home culture may be permanent. 

 
May 12, 20 8:49 am
Wood Guy

I know several builders and architects in the Hudson Valley and Berkshires--they are seeing an influx from NYC already. 

May 12, 20 9:00 am  · 
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x-jla

Hopefully the fundamental inner desires of urbanites for community, sustainability, and substance will compel a new sub-urban paradigm.

2  · 
Wood Guy

I agree! Actually I hope the urbanites stay in the cities, but if they are going to leave I hope we can develop functioning communities and not just house parks focused on "quality" of schools. I'm actually not sure what you mean by "substance," can you elaborate?

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x-jla

I’m not sure. I guess I mean things beyond the materialistic. Entertainment, culture, etc.

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joseffischer

My anecdotes, my friends and I at a few ATL firms all hear good things about our productivity WFH and generally firm owners seem pleased.  At the same time, we are all being expected to come back to work shortly here and behave like this thing is "over".  This suburban trap seems very well laid out to me.  Head out to get more space at cheaper rent, start your new commute with no traffic, and in a year realize you're driving over an hour each way on a good day.  I guess if people are just renting, they could just move again... but we'll see.

FYI, I'm supposed to return full-time in the office on May 18, 2020.  Currently I've been required to go to job sites and "hop in" for design meetings with principals about 2-3 times a week.  


May 12, 20 9:43 am  · 
1  · 
archanonymous

Agreed - look how quickly WFH become "the new normal." Once this is over via vaccine or other means, the new "new normal" of being in the shitty suburbs will be hard to cope with.

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x-jla

“The shitty suburbs” are shitty because of stupid zoning laws and lack of imagination. There is no reason that we can’t design better sustainable sub-urban environments.

2  · 
SneakyPete

When I am stuck in my property, I can imagine having an acre being a luxury. I don't need the public transit, would drive less (once a week to the grocer), and would have a yard to go out in. As it stands I have one crowded-as-fuck park and my roof.

 · 
SneakyPete

On the beach. Overlooking the high line?

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x-jla

?

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Non Sequitur

jla, you missed some fun. There was a fresh account posting some half-ass trolling. got nuked.

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Non Sequitur

Honestly, I don't like working from home.  My home is my home, not my office and I like to keep things separate. I also like my pressed shirts and pants.

May 12, 20 12:53 pm  · 
4  · 
midlander

i like the flexibility, especially to be able to catch up on stuff early mornings or after everyone's in bed. but i absolutely get less done during wfh.

1  · 
Non Sequitur

I hear ya but I was already catching up the evenings while home when required. That was a once in a while deal and since I have client and management responsibilities, it was expected. I find that I'm working longer at home over the last 2 months but at 50-75% capacity.

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citizen

^ Agree with the double-edged, devil's bargain experience. Enjoy the flexibility and comfort, detest the productivity drop and multiple distractions. The shorts and flip-flops are a side issue.

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