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Could an architectural engineer do both their job and an architect’s job?

kristinaziso
I just started studying architectural engineering and I wanted to know if an arch engineer would also be able to design their own building while also doing the engineering part? Or do they necessarily have to work with actual architects and their already completed designs? I’m equally interested in both engineering and the artistic design aspect of it and I wanted to know if it was possible to do both.
 
Jan 17, 20 4:56 am
poop876

Yes!

Jan 17, 20 8:52 am
code

I worked with one, they can - architectural engineering is really the way to go  @ Cal Poly SLO

Jan 17, 20 11:54 am
RickB-Astoria

It entirely depends on the states and to what extent an engineer may do what is 'practice of architecture' as far as being incidental to their practice of engineering. Each state has their interpretation as this is somewhat a gray area within their respective laws and rules and overlap practice is contested territory so to speak.

Jan 17, 20 12:46 pm
SneakyPete

Possible to do both? Yes. Possible to gain architecture licensure? Depends on the degree's status with NCARB.

Jan 17, 20 1:56 pm
RickB-Astoria

Even if not NAAB accredited, the state licensing board may give some credit towards the licensure process of the state.

SneakyPete

Not likely.

mightyaa

Yes.  Assuming the degree is both ABET and NAAB accredited, you can get both licenses.  My Dad had both from OSU (where I went too but didn't get the AE degree).  Basically, with that degree, you could do the internship and take both exams getting dual licenses becoming a licensed architect and structural engineer. 

Oh, and RickB isn't wrong; Some states, like Colorado, have a grandfather clause which basically allows work experience (I think 12 years) to substitute for a accredited degree.  The key is at least in Colorado, you had to start your professional experience before something like 1995.. CO is a bit unique though since none of our public schools for awhile had a NAAB (architect) accreditation; they lost it.  So they got sued by those who were already in the program, lost, and had to put in another way to become licensed without having to pay out-of-state tuition and moving.  It expanded to every license that a degree wasn't the only option.  

Trivia; So... if you ever run across a licensed Colorado architect stamp that is a "X" license... they were one of the class action people that had to sue the state; I think there's about 40 of them. Back in the day a "A" license was a reciprocity, and a "C" meant you took the exam in State. Since then, they gave us a number; another lawsuit because building departments discriminated against the "A" license folks (and probably the X folks) and favored the local "C" boys like me... I miss the good ole boy club :/  Shit like this doesn't show up in Google btw.  You'd have to be ancient like my Dad who passed this verbal history down to me, or dig through old court documents for 'why' things are the way they are. 

Jan 20, 20 4:39 pm
SneakyPete

Broken clock, blind squirrel, etc. His being "right" based on one circumstance in the past is a huge stretch.


tintt

Too long, didn't read. Gone rock climbing.

RickB-Astoria

I was thinking of California Architect Board as an example. For example: California Architect Board does give some credit for bachelors degrees in a field related to architecture. ( https://www.cab.ca.gov/candidates/becoming_a_licensed_architect/requirements_for_eligibility.shtml ) In the drop down, select "bachelor's degree in a field related to architecture. To find the definition of "fields related to architecture"... go to here: ( https://www.cab.ca.gov/candidates/education/field_related_to_architecture.shtml ). Several states also have experience based path to licensure in which some credit can sometimes be from under a licensed engineer. Thank you mightyaa for sharing about Colorado.

SneakyPete

In my research the moment you have any sort of record with NCARB you're pretty much fucked out of any alternatives.

RickB-Astoria

That's not 100% true. At least how you appeared to have explained it. Maybe it may take some more research and nuance approach understanding of things but I am not disagreeing with that being somewhat true some of the times in some places.

sameolddoctor

Jack of all trades master of none.

Jan 21, 20 5:14 pm

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