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Could an architectural engineer do both their job and an architect’s job?

kristinaziso
I just started studying architectural engineering and I wanted to know if an arch engineer would also be able to design their own building while also doing the engineering part? Or do they necessarily have to work with actual architects and their already completed designs? I’m equally interested in both engineering and the artistic design aspect of it and I wanted to know if it was possible to do both.
 
Jan 17, 20 4:56 am
poop876

Yes!

Jan 17, 20 8:52 am  · 
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zonker

I worked with one, they can - architectural engineering is really the way to go  @ Cal Poly SLO

Jan 17, 20 11:54 am  · 
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SneakyPete

Possible to do both? Yes. Possible to gain architecture licensure? Depends on the degree's status with NCARB.

Jan 17, 20 1:56 pm  · 
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SneakyPete

Not likely.

Jan 17, 20 3:49 pm  · 
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mightyaa

Yes.  Assuming the degree is both ABET and NAAB accredited, you can get both licenses.  My Dad had both from OSU (where I went too but didn't get the AE degree).  Basically, with that degree, you could do the internship and take both exams getting dual licenses becoming a licensed architect and structural engineer. 

Oh, and RickB isn't wrong; Some states, like Colorado, have a grandfather clause which basically allows work experience (I think 12 years) to substitute for a accredited degree.  The key is at least in Colorado, you had to start your professional experience before something like 1995.. CO is a bit unique though since none of our public schools for awhile had a NAAB (architect) accreditation; they lost it.  So they got sued by those who were already in the program, lost, and had to put in another way to become licensed without having to pay out-of-state tuition and moving.  It expanded to every license that a degree wasn't the only option.  

Trivia; So... if you ever run across a licensed Colorado architect stamp that is a "X" license... they were one of the class action people that had to sue the state; I think there's about 40 of them. Back in the day a "A" license was a reciprocity, and a "C" meant you took the exam in State. Since then, they gave us a number; another lawsuit because building departments discriminated against the "A" license folks (and probably the X folks) and favored the local "C" boys like me... I miss the good ole boy club :/  Shit like this doesn't show up in Google btw.  You'd have to be ancient like my Dad who passed this verbal history down to me, or dig through old court documents for 'why' things are the way they are. 

Jan 20, 20 4:39 pm  · 
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SneakyPete

Broken clock, blind squirrel, etc. His being "right" based on one circumstance in the past is a huge stretch.


Jan 21, 20 11:35 am  · 
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tintt

Too long, didn't read. Gone rock climbing.

Jan 21, 20 12:02 pm  · 
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SneakyPete

In my research the moment you have any sort of record with NCARB you're pretty much fucked out of any alternatives.

Jan 21, 20 3:58 pm  · 
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sameolddoctor

Jack of all trades master of none.

Jan 21, 20 5:14 pm  · 
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taniamejia

But oftentimes better than a master of one.

May 18, 22 9:39 am  · 
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Mbarkitek

In Pennsylvania. Yes. no distinction.

But it calls into question what kind of architect/engineer wants to do the work of both...

Feb 3, 21 9:28 pm  · 
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natematt

Yeah... I would argue that the question is flawed.

Feb 4, 21 4:26 am  · 
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Wood Guy

I'd ask what kind of architect (or designer) wouldn't want to understand and be able to do their own engineering as well. Sure you can hire consultants for every aspect of design but I prefer an integrated approach, doing as much in-house as I can.

Feb 4, 21 10:01 am  · 
1  · 
JawkneeMusic

Hell yeah lol

May 18, 22 11:58 am  · 
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Mbarkitek

Wood guy - do you change the oil in your car?  Do you fix your HVAC system when something breaks?  I used to do this.  Now I hire a person who does that specific thing for a living.

Understanding the concepts is one thing. Doing the work is another. 

I would rather be an architect that understands engineering, but doesn't follow the load path on my 4 story hotel project to design the steel connections at the basement, then take the time from the practice of design architecture to complete the engineering as well. 

Feb 4, 21 10:21 am  · 
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Wood Guy

I know I'm weird, and I only design homes and renovations and understand why you may not want to do all of the engineering on a larger project. I have changed the oil in my car many times but now find it a better value to have someone else do it. I do some of my own HVAC work and design systems for the high-performance homes I design. Specializing can be smart, but so can understanding the engineering side of design.

Feb 4, 21 11:19 am  · 
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gibbost

Could?  Yes.  Should?  No

Feb 4, 21 11:28 am  · 
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atelier nobody

In the US, it varies from state to state, and in some cases between local jurisdictions within a state.

My question is, why would one get an engineering degree if they wan to practice architecture, or an architecture degree if they want to practice engineering? (Wanting to do both is another thing, and entirely admirable, but is a long row to hoe whatever your education.)

Feb 4, 21 2:24 pm  · 
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Wood Guy

Public service announcement: this is a necro/re-animated thread. But still an interesting topic. 

Feb 4, 21 2:36 pm  · 
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reallynotmyname

Having a firm owner who is both a structural engineer and an architect works really well if you do residential and small commercial.  There are several firms of the type in my city.   They can self-perform smaller scale stuff more efficiently than those who have to hire outside engineering subs.  Especially today when too many structural firms are turning down "small" projects or asking for jumbo fees to do simple things.

May 18, 22 10:02 am  · 
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JawkneeMusic

obscure eng: post-tensioned wood

May 18, 22 12:02 pm  · 
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It's not an obscure engineering concept. In fact it's used quite a bit in glue-lam and heavy timber construction.

May 18, 22 12:17 pm  · 
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JawkneeMusic

the thing is your engineer may not be able to do your design.  For instance wave propogation in beams.  They don't teach Raleigh-Euler waves even in engineering school.  Then u'd have to use the Timoshenko beam deflection

May 18, 22 12:04 pm  · 
 ·  1

How would you know what is taught in a structural engineering or architectural program? You've never been through either.

May 18, 22 12:15 pm  · 
1  · 
Non Sequitur

Jawknee, just install the revit plugin and click a few options. Done!

May 18, 22 12:22 pm  · 
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rcz1001

There are two general tracks of issues.

On one track, it's the education and experiences of the individual architectural engineer. In theory, a person who is an architectural engineer could very possibly have the background to be a very creative designer but has the depth of engineering background of an architectural engineer. NOTE: An A.E. would be more like what used to be known in the profession as a technical architect in that they are more technical/engineering-oriented and have more engineering in their curriculum than may be typical in a NAAB accredited degree. However, an A.E. is more like a jack-of-all engineering trades than a specialist. Those engineers that focus on specific engineering disciplines like structural engineering, mechanical, electrical, etc. those engineers will have more depth in that discipline.

The other track is an important issue and that of legal issues. Now, don't think if it is okay for engineers to engage in the practice of architecture incidental to their engineering discipline that the engineer can do your job. That can be a serious issue in some states. 

For example: In the state of Washington: https://www.atg.wa.gov/ago-opi...

I'll let you read the AGO. If you are licensed in Washington, it is an informative read for understanding a specific legal issue matter. There are other states with similar issues. Therefore, if you are in a state like Washington, an engineer, even if they are an architectural engineer, and highly capable, can not engage in the practice of architecture. Where and how exactly that line is drawn and where one crosses the line or not is sometimes unclear. Of course, if the state has exemptions, then work that doesn't require an architect to prepare, stamp/seal, etc., an engineer may design as any other person may... but the legal issue crops up when we are dealing with buildings not exempt under a state's architect law from the requirement of those buildings being designed, prepared by or under the supervision & control, and stamped/sealed by a registered/licensed architect.

Therefore, even if an engineer is very capable, the laws of a particular jurisdiction may require that the engineer does not cross the turf into another licensed profession's territory of professional activities unless duly licensed in that profession as well. 

Therefore, do your legal homework on the matters. 

May 18, 22 2:24 pm  · 
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