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Retirement CADD On A Budget

Broadstreetexpresstrain

Ok Archinect audience...I am interested In continuing my drawing -design and rendering ability into retirement on a budget for residential and small scale commercial projects.

What is you opinion of sketchup pro vs autocadd for simple ability to do 2D drawings and 3 d models with light photo real render availability......

Also do you typically import your drawings from these programs into photo shop to dress them up and add people trees and other elements...furniture and cars? 

Thanks

 
Dec 15, 19 9:03 pm
archanonymous

Rhino.

Dec 15, 19 10:15 pm  · 
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Blender.

Dec 15, 19 10:38 pm  · 
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bowling_ball

Both

Dec 15, 19 10:52 pm  · 
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midlander

sketchup is fun. it's not retirement if you've still got to use autocad.

Dec 16, 19 5:46 am  · 
2  · 
Almosthip7

Revit


Dec 16, 19 11:07 am  · 
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urbanity

sketchup pro for modeling and layout for documentation. qcad is good for importing/exporting dwg files. photoshop for fine tuning renderings. look up sketchupbook.com

Dec 16, 19 11:44 am  · 
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corepractice

I agree that 3D modeling is the way to go. From my experience, it's quicker than Autocad, and less prone to coordination errors if you use your modeling app to produce your drawing sets.  

Sketchup is the least expensive, easiest to learn, has great visualization styles, but Layout just doesn't pass the test for CDs. 

Vectorworks Architect is a favorite because it's easy to model, has awesome 2D tools, and has the best render styles of any. You get really good visual satisfaction and great sketch styles for each phase of the design process. $160/mo. 

Revit LT is what I've been using for the past 4 years because I fell for the myth that Revit is more compatible with consultants. That's not true at all. But it's a pretty good deal for $60/mo. One of Revit's weaknesses is that its perspective navigation is so crude that it's almost unusable, which is surprising for a 3D modeling app. Colors are also very crude and outdated. 1990-ish. But if all of your output is backline 2D, then Revit might be right for you. 

There's a serious learning curve with each of these, so I recommend investing in training. Hope this helps. Good luck with your new practice!

Mar 3, 21 1:31 pm  · 
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