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Multiple questions

francisbergeron

I have multiple architecture questions for you guys. 

First, currently There are multiple housses getting build where the Roof arrives flush with the Walls. I am on Canada, super cold climate therefore why the hell are people building IT that way? With all the water sliding on the extérieur wall IT Will destroy the building quickly ans mais IT last way less long? Isnt IT? 

2nd question is, I See big compagnies like BIG and 3xn building a lot of Circular buildings. What are the avantages for that? Isnt it way more complicated to build that way? And way more expensive? 


Thanks for.your help guys

 
Nov 13, 19 6:39 pm
Non Sequitur

it is possible to build clean wall to roof connections if you know what you’re doing. Most are either cladding on furring or rain screen systems coupled with good drainage layer.   It’s far more complicated to detail these than a typical roof overhang or gutter. 


As for circular buildings, yes, they can easily be exponentially more expensive than ones who are not circular. It’s fine for for the look more than for functionality. In other news, water is wet at room temperature.   

Nov 13, 19 7:18 pm
francisbergeron

What Do you Mean by water is wet at Room température? What is the link with Circular buildings? 


And even with the set Up you talked about for no overhang buildings, once water slides on the cladding IT Will Stoll leave traces on IT and IT Will Stoll damage the material way quicker 

Nov 14, 19 7:29 am
Non Sequitur

Some materials are resistant to normal rainfall and many people like the weathered look. Others don’t care because money is no issue and they will just renovate / sell in a few years anyways. You’re ignoring quite a few factors in your general observation.

Non Sequitur

Wet water vs circle building = obvious question gets obvious answer. 8-)

francisbergeron

People not Carling about money, and living weathered building after 10 years.. I dont know. Thèse are mot logical "observations" from architectural stand point". Resist to what extent? Im Curious about IT. Buildings without proper water management are easy to see...

Non Sequitur

water "management" is a big part of my job and I don't see a problem if it's something taken seriously. It's about understanding materials (and combination of them), construction tolerances, and reasonable workmanship.

Wood Guy

While overhangs usually protect the wall below, the taller the building the less it matters. Using conventional, traditional details, you're right, the building will fail more quickly than one with an overhang. But with high performance building techniques and materials it's not very difficult to create a durable structure without overhangs. 

Nov 14, 19 9:52 am
francisbergeron

Awesome thanks m'y friend. Do you have ideas for durable materials against rain? Thanks for your reply

Chad Miller

Hire an architect if you want to get an answer.

Non Sequitur

Chad, our friend Francis is a fresh technologist grad from the depths of snowy Quebec. See his previous post on almost the same subject. It appears that he has a habit starting superficial arguments.

Wood Guy

Francis, my experience is only residential, and though physics remains the same, the products and methods vary when it comes to commercial construction. 

I would not build a conventionally-detailed home without overhangs, except in high wind areas. In high performance home design, which is my area of expertise, the cladding is not considered waterproof, and the WRB—weather resistive barrier (or variants) does need to be watertight, and is often airtight as well. The best-performing WRB I have used is Pro Clima Solitex Mento. Siga Majvest is good too. Both can be used on walls as well as roofs, but Siga Majcoat is more robust. All seams need to be sealed with compatible tape. 

 Outside the WRB there needs to be a rainscreen gap. When there is no roof overhang, the gap must be deep—at least ¾” and more is better, open at top and bottom to allow reservoir cladding (cladding that can hold moisture) to dry quickly. 

 For cladding, I prefer materials with low embodied carbon, so I like to use naturally rot-resistant wood such as eastern white cedar, or wood that is acetylated or thermally modified for rot resistance. Rot-resistant wood that is able to dry quickly will last a long time, even without a finish. And with a rainscreen gap, finishes adhere much longer than when saturated with moisture.

Non Sequitur

wood guy, that description above thoroughly aroused me.

Wood Guy

Non, I'm both pleased and uncomfortable with your comment ;-)

Non Sequitur

^good.

liberty bell

(insert joke about wetness being a *good* thing, in this case)

Non Sequitur

damn it Donna... not before I've had my 3 cups of coffee.

francisbergeron

Awesome you answered perfectly to m'y question thanks m'y Friend. I really appreciate tour Time ans explanations. I knew part of the answer I juste wanted to See différent ways to think thanks again sir.

Nov 14, 19 5:34 pm
francisbergeron

Non seq, you are offended on 90% of the posts. Qu'en you answer " There are rich people Who dont care" as an answer... M'y questions are legit and yeah I am intriguated about gutters, water management etc... Im Working for an architect and que were just wondering other oppinions a d options.

Non Sequitur

I am very rarely offended by things in the forum.

maureenowaters

Beautiful question and beautiful answer too.

Nov 18, 19 5:22 am
Chad Miller

Yes but really poor typing on the OP's part. Yes, yes, I know English is the op's 2nd (or 3rd) language.

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