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High Quality Renders

auninja91

What do you think is a user friendly way or software to take a 3d render and turn it into a much better looking high quality render?

 
May 3, 18 10:36 am
Non Sequitur

Vray with post-rendering Photoshop wizardry is the norm.

User friendly? try pen & paper.

May 3, 18 10:42 am
Le Courvoisier

Pay someone that specializes in 3d viz to do it. It's going to most likely cost less and take less time than doing it yourself if you don't have the latest equipment / people that specialize in it. 

May 3, 18 11:15 am
auninja91

I'm good with photoshop but I'm looking to broaden my skillset. Maybe try something popular ....vray would be a good time investment to learn then cause I got time :)


May 3, 18 11:19 am
mightyaa

Le Courvoisier got it right...  You'll find that you will spend more time fussing around and fighting software than you can bill.  So hire folks that make a profession out of it.  It's a lot less stressful and quicker.

May 3, 18 1:34 pm
archinine
Most of the render softwares work very similarly. However it’d be a stretch to say that any of them are user friendly. The (sort of) nice thing about that is once you wrap your head around the basic concepts of material mapping, scaling, texturing, lighting lingo etc you can usually figure out a new one relatively quickly. Which renderer to use is also heavily dependent on what modeling software you’re using. Learning vray in detail will give you a broad skill set that you could apply to most other rendering engines as it’s one of the deepest programs available.

The best way to (really) learn any software is to click on every button, menu item and slider and see what it does. Take note of the useful stuff and ignore the rest.
May 3, 18 8:18 pm
homme_du_jura

I would recommend Enscape. Extremely easy to use and seamlessly compatible with both Revit, Sketchup and Rhino.  The quality of the renderings are better than V-Ray and take 1/10th of the time.  Definitely a game-changer in our studio.  

May 5, 18 9:41 am
Spoons

I’m sure Enscape is far easier to use and makes a lot of sense for its integration into other software but its quality is no where near V-Ray renderings done by someone who knows what they are doing.

BulgarBlogger

Do you know whar quality is about? Many softwares can produce a “quality” result- but quality depends on what you are trying to achieve. In general, the more control over details you want, the more complex the software. If you are just concerned with spitting out a representation that is not super accurate and doesn’t have lots of details (ex- water specs in a rainy scene and effect lf the sweating or dirt of a piece of glass) then the more simple softwares will d the trick. Usually you have to decide on how much detail you want and then layer in lighting, texture mapping, etc. Photorealistic renderings are usually done with vray, 3ds Max, and Photoshop, as well as a huge library of high-resolution bump and texture maps and other imported furniture and other objects. 

May 5, 18 1:05 pm
Liz_Lf

Bit late to this thread! But would recommend finding a professional to do photo realistic renders, can be cheaper than in house, faster, and they are trained to do it rather than testing out a program. 


Sep 19, 19 4:51 pm

Here's my list based on quality of rendering/experience and familiarity:

1. Vray (most time intensive to setup-also needs an expensive asset library to get right)
2. Unreal/Unity (extremely good for fly throughs- can get stills pretty close to Vray. On time/quality ratio I rate these the highest)
3. Enscape (works very well with Sketchup/Rhino/Revit)
4. Lumion (I haven't used this for a few years now and it seems to be stepping up its game but used to be pretty mediocre)

Post processing software is usually Photoshop for stills and premier pro/after effects for walkthrough/fly-through

Also good rendering depends on the following things more than the software in no specific order:

1. Getting the right mood, objects and entourage in that conveys the design intent effectively
2. Getting the right lighting- daylight and ambient (this is one of the trickier things to do in rendering)
3. Materials



Sep 20, 19 1:28 am

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