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'tis the season...for performance reviews and raises.

molten

I'm getting ready for my yearly performance review/raise. I ask throughout the year how I'm doing to the partners I work with, and I'm anticipating a positive review. However, I'm having a little difficulty determining what I should reasonably expect/ask for in terms of a raise. I am 4.5 years post-grad, licensed, and work mostly independently with limited oversight from partners. I've used the AIA's salary calculator in the past with luck, but as I have become licensed I really don't fit in any of these categories. There is no category for licensed architects with 3-5 years of experience, and the closest match is an architect with 5-8 years of experience -- in my region the median (including bonus) is approximately 73k. Conversely, an unlicensed design professional with 5-8 years of experience clocks in at approximately 62k (including bonus), which matches my yearly salary/bonus.

Thoughts, or maybe someone in a similar situation? I'm in the mid-atlantic region for reference. 

 
Nov 11, 17 8:19 pm
randomised

Your work pre-license was already worth the equivalent of a salary of someone with 5-8 years experience. If licensure normally means an 11k pay raise, simply ask for that. They obviously value you.

Nov 12, 17 1:28 am
oneLOSTarchitect

I received a .50 cent raise for my license! Hahahahahaha

Nov 12, 17 6:53 am
randomised

Per...

oneLOSTarchitect

????

geezertect

When a firm puts a 50 cent premium on being licensed, aren't they saying that you (and they) are in a meaningless occcupation? Freudian slip?

oneLOSTarchitect

I was told I was lucky to receive a raise!

randomised

You know...50ct per month,week,day or hr ;)

oneLOSTarchitect

Sorry per year... had to calculate it cause they only gave it to me after 3 years

randomised

You're very patient and generous.

oneLOSTarchitect

Patient yes... not sure how generous that was... more like a slap to the face.

randomised

Yep, but you're generous for accepting that "raise". Probably the reason for starting the other thread about quitting ;)

oneLOSTarchitect

well I calculated it over 3 years... since I got a raise after three years... so it’s 50 cents per year... and I should be thankful!

Nov 12, 17 2:07 pm
Non Sequitur
I got 9k when I got licensed.
Nov 12, 17 2:31 pm
DeTwan

you also got ur gay card when you got licensed...shuu...pineapple juice is my 'safe' word. What's yours?

Nov 12, 17 5:41 pm
oneLOSTarchitect

Wtf

curtkram

my safe word is 'don't stop'

molten

Actually I got my gay card when I uttered my first word. When did you get yours?

oneLOSTarchitect

Are all architects this weird?

tduds

You need a card to be gay now?

DeTwan

No, the card more or less gets you discounts at places like body works, chanel, and starbucks in the mall

oneLOSTarchitect

I’m scared to ask... but what’s a safe wor
d?

thatsthat

People really get raises once they get licenses? I was told in my firm by the managing partner that no one gets a raise simply for earning their license. Do you ask for one the day it's official or wait a year or so and prove that you can do more than you could before?

Nov 13, 17 7:57 am
spiketwig

My firm offered a bonus ($1,500) for initial license but no pay increase. But I was able to push for an increase of a total of $10k thru in the ~18 months following getting my license. It came incrementally (asked and received an increase about 9 months after getting licensed and then got the max standard increase at annual reviews on top of that).

But the reason for the raise was ostensibly that I had taken on more responsibility - not because of the license per se, but I really only could have taken on the responsibilities WITH the license, so...it's related. 

s=r*(theta)

I got a $1,000 bonus for license plus reimbursement for exams passed, and $5k raise after license. Truth be told, to an owner $5k is not a lot of money especially of you are making then 3x$5k. I think the problem with most people is they get licensed but they are still thinking like a cad drafter employee. but sometimes its a trade off what you are learning/working on compared to a pay increase

thatsthat

Thanks for the responses! I've been told no raises for license or other reasons, but am hoping I can show I'm worth it (by taking as much as I can volunteer for) and intend to stick around for the long-term. I love the people I work with and the projects, but it's hard to stay when the pay is below average.

bowling_ball

I was told I wouldn't be getting a raise. Firm paid for exams and license. .... A few months later I was talking with the owners casually and they bumped me $10k. A few months later they repeated that. But I think my experience isn't normal. My salary is significantly higher than nearly all of my peers. (And I still don't own a suit).

s=r*(theta)

thank God Ive made it through the really dark part of this career and have got a little breathing room. But at this point in my career I dont really concern myself w/ raise's & bonus's as much as I do building relationships

DeTwan

Architecture license remind me of the scene in Tommy Boy where Chris Farley start talking about how 'anyone can shit in a box and slap a guarantee on it'...

But then again I am a firm owner that clears over $100k in contracts a year, so you could say that I receive a lot of resumes that starchitects receive in their inbox....

I usually start my Harvard grads at $15 an hour and then we see where they stand after a 9 month trial period...most quit in the first 6.

Nov 14, 17 12:06 am
bowling_ball

Too funny.

I'm not a robot

$100k revenue a year and you can afford employees?

Non Sequitur

I remember rejecting my first job offer straight out of grad school... and the offer was $15/hr and that was 10 years ago.

sameolddoctor

100k in an year hahaha. And you get Harvard graduates? GTFO

s=r*(theta)

Any one can put turds in a box but not everyone has an architecture license, so im hearing you put extreme value on the latter

archiwutm8

You guys don't get a consistent yearly raise? I get 1.5% automatically every year.

Nov 14, 17 10:48 am
randomised

Working in Europe I suppose.

Non Sequitur

1.5% is typical for me too, as a base for everyone. More than that is dependant on performance.

bowling_ball

I know I'm going to hit a ceiling soon, but if I was offered less than ~6% per year, I'd definitely walk. I've averaged over 15% year-over-year, the last 5 years at the same firm. If you get less than 5%, you really don't value your own work (and neither do they).

archiwutm8

If I got 6% in the UK every year I'd be in the top 1% earners in the UK.

Non Sequitur

6% or 15% per year is not sustainable and definitively not a minimum bench mark in any reasonable world. If that's what your getting, you likely accepted a position below market value.

s=r*(theta)

I dont get a consistent raise but I typically always get an annual bonus of $2k or more, one year it was $5k

bowling_ball

NS - only slightly true that I took a position for less than I thought I was worth, but I was unemployed and needed work. And at my first review 5 months later, I got a 20% raise. I've more than doubled my salary since starting here in early 2013. I've also become licensed and have taken on huge responsibility. I just wrapped up a $50M job and I'm starting another $35M project right now, both as PM.

bowling_ball

Like I said, I'm the exception and I'm fortunate. And I stand by my assertion that at least at the beginning of your career, you should be climbing the pay scale very quickly. I also said that this slows down.

archiwutm8

I can't tell if you earn a standard amount and started low or you're one of the top earners in our profession.

bowling_ball

I'll clarify further and say that while I took this job for less than I was probably worth, it was still more than my previous job by a couple percent. I have been very fortunate.

Non Sequitur

Bowling, that makes more sense... I can't imagine any junior wanker starting at, say 40k and moving to 46, 52, to nearly 60 in 3 years based on a 15% raise. You need to bring something seriously wicked to the office to get that level scratch.

Non Sequitur

come to think of it, my raises at year one and two was 6% each time... then licensed in year 3 jumped me up another 20%. That quick increase made the next few years' cost of living only adjustments easier to manage.

archiwutm8

It's different but I did double my salary when I went to construction...

molten

Our firm has a 5k automatic raise when you get licensed. I got licensed two months after my raise at the end of last year (+8.5%). Unless you're an associate/principal, you're billed at 3x your direct expense so the firm is earning no less money as a result of raises. Unless you're inefficient and slow.

bowling_ball

NS, since I'm anonymous here and open, I'll tell you that I started at 40k in early 2013 and my raise and bonus this coming year will bring in $95k. So yes I'm doing something right, when you look at it that way.

spiketwig

^ in response to the annual raise thread

it's varied for me by office (west coast, US), but generally between 5%-10% annual increase is what I've seen. I've been told that 5% is the max allowable annual increase at my current place, but I'm equally confident that that's a line they feed us to keep our expectations low.. 

Nov 14, 17 4:12 pm
bowling_ball

If they say 5%, remember that 2% is just a straight cost of living increase, in which case you're really getting an increase of 3%. It's something, but it's not much. The largest jumps in salary come by getting a new job.

Xenakis

fees are down and schedules are shorter - more demands - its getting harder to prove value to justify increases

Nov 14, 17 4:34 pm
spiketwig

not if you can still deliver..

Non Sequitur

No problems here.

Le Courvoisier

Xenakis, sounds like everyone only views you as a CAD monkey. No wonder you're so damn pessimistic.

Nov 14, 17 6:06 pm
chigurh

dude is the saddest bot on archinect.

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