Archinect
anchor

Ramps in Plan: Is the Apex Up or Down?

Redjester

I'm pretty sure the apex is pointed down on a ramp in plan, but I'm not certain.  Some plans only have the triangle w/ the apex and no written "up" or "down" or arrow.  


Can anyone help?

 
Dec 17, 15 9:23 pm
citizen

This is variable enough that we won't find agreement.  To be safe: label the direction arrow with u/d text.

Dec 17, 15 9:52 pm  · 
2  · 
Redjester

Thanks Citizen,

That's surprising considering the number of plans that solely use the "triangle" on its ramps.  I figured it must be a universal thing as otherwise they'd be writing "Up"/"Down" or drawing arrows. 

Shame as well because I like the aesthetic of it.  

Out of curiosity, what's more common?

Dec 17, 15 10:01 pm  · 
 · 

The key thing is to have it be consistent in the whole set of drawings, and the arrow with text is much better than the triangle because I had a project where the contractor misread the lines as valleys in a sloped floor. we did catch it early before they poured the first slabs. If Revit will let you use the arrow with text and dash the lines if they must be present.

 · 
b3tadine[sutures]

Strangely enough, I always like the ascending arrow.

Dec 17, 15 10:11 pm  · 
 · 
citizen

With no text, I usually assume the arrow points up.

Dec 17, 15 10:16 pm  · 
1  · 

The road to hell is paved with assumptions. 

Dec 17, 15 10:28 pm  · 
 · 

Apex of the triangle points up. (The memory trick I use for this is to imagine a liquid being poured down the ramp, and spreading out in the shape of the triangle as it flows downhill.) I've never seen it pointing down in any office I've worked. For construction documents I add text and spot elevations just to make it as idiot-proof as possible.

Dec 17, 15 10:51 pm  · 
2  · 
rypat

Agree with this approach on CDs to make it foolproof. This is also the mnemonic device I
use.

 · 
Redjester

Thanks Dave, so in other words, think of it as an arrow pointing up.  Oddly enough, some other boards (not to mention google images) were suggesting the latter.  

Thanks again.

Dec 17, 15 10:55 pm  · 
 · 
I was thinking about this recently too. I idiot proof it with an arrow and text. Last thing you want is a change order due to civil not grading it properly when they misunderstood the drawing (would most likely be caught in coordination, but still).
Dec 18, 15 7:03 am  · 
 · 
JeromeS

I like to label the ramp-stair with lower case letters as up/dn to further confuse the issue...

Dec 18, 15 10:03 am  · 
 · 
Redjester

JeromeS, 

LOL!!!

Dec 18, 15 10:09 am  · 
 · 
citizen

Jerome wins today's prize

Dec 18, 15 11:54 am  · 
 · 
proto

without any letters, it's a trap door

Dec 18, 15 6:52 pm  · 
 · 
jeremyfretts

There seems to be no consensus among architects, but I disagree with "pointing up."  I always show the arrow pointing down the slope, which is consistent with common practice in roof plans, civil and landscape architecture drawings.

If you take my advice, all arrows in your drawings, from top of roof to bottom of site, will always point down.

(And stairs and ramps should be labeled, and shown in section too)

Jun 2, 17 10:57 am  · 
 · 
proto

arrows point away from the floor level of the current plan -- up & down as required

 · 
jessiehong

apex should point down, that is representing the slope direction which the water directions.

Mar 5, 18 6:00 pm  · 
 · 
adityasnath

It depends on which level you cut the plan. If the level goes down with respect to where you stand, the arrow faces down and vice versa.

Mar 11, 18 11:22 am  · 
 · 
geezertect

Use words, particularly since there is obviously no consensus.  Vagueness in a legal document is construed against the party who has the most control over its drafting.  That's us, architects.

Mar 11, 18 2:07 pm  · 
 · 
randomised

In the Netherlands the arrow in plan of stairs and ramps always points upwards.

Mar 11, 18 3:11 pm  · 
 · 
soumitra

Idiotic.

UP >

or 

DOWN >

Pick one.

 · 
tintt

Obviously nobody should be using this annotation if nobody knows how it should read. Move on. 

Apr 25, 18 7:13 pm  · 
 · 
jamesyevgeniyosborne

UK "Architect's Pocket Book" shows arrow pointing UP.

DOWN > UP

Jun 18, 18 9:35 am  · 
1  · 

Everything is backwards in the UK, you guys even drive on the wrong side of the road.

Jun 18, 18 10:06 am  · 
 · 
apscoradiales

Believe it or not, the Brits are doing it right. They do it the way Romans did it when they hauled carts and things way back when. Or so I read somewhere.

If you in London and walking the streets, just remember "Look Right".

 · 
randomised

Just put up or dn next to the arrow ;)

Jun 18, 18 11:25 am  · 
2  · 
Non Sequitur

...wait.. I see what you did there.


 · 
citizen

You magnificent bastard.

1  · 
mdsaifurrahman

https://www.dezeen.com/2016/11...

https://www.archdaily.com/5451...

Down>Up,

as i have seen some of the drawings in different sites.

Aug 30, 19 6:18 pm  · 
 · 
rypat

I use two mnemonic devices:

1)  liquid being poured at the top of the ramp spreads wider as it flows downhill.  High < Low

2) Imagine a mountain, the peak (apex) is at the high side, the base (wider) is at the low side.  High < Low

PS) I agree that assumptions are varied enough to warrant text notation as well... or spot elevations on the flat floors on each side.

Jan 15, 21 1:46 pm  · 
 ·  1
apscoradiales

Think of it a window/door swing in elevation. The pointy end is upper end, and the other is two is the bottom end.

Of course, if you are in other parts of the World, then it could be the  reverse.

I stopped using that long time ago; prefer the arrow that either points down or up from the level that is being shown on the floor plan. So, if you're on the Level 1, and you want to go lower, then show the arrow pointing down and a note DN, but if you want to go up, then show the arrow pointing up with a note UP. Couldn't be more simple.

Jan 15, 21 2:12 pm  · 
 · 
rypat

I agree text notation is clearest and leaves no room for doubt. 


But we don’t typically use text notation on elevations of doors, windows, or cabinet door swings (except in shop drawings, where everything is explicit), and those are all understood by their graphics alone on architectural sheets, i’ve never once added “hinge”, or “latch” to door elevations, even ones without visible hardware.  


There’s also the case where you’re putting together a clean marketing plan with not text at all, and want the graphic notation to stand for itself, and in this case it’s helpful to have a standard arrow direction just like we have for door swings in elevation.   

Jan 15, 21 2:43 pm  · 
 · 
apscoradiales

I've always indicated swings on door and window elevations. Also, for windows, we used to say O.I. or O.O. (opening in or opening out. Lessens the confusion during tendering; shop drawings only confirm it. To each his own, I guess. If doing some other way works for you, then that's fine.

 · 

Block this user


Are you sure you want to block this user and hide all related comments throughout the site?

  • ×Search in: