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Knowlton School of Architecture (Marc Syp)

 

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    On a Pedestal

    mpsyp Sep 27 '05 4

    So we found out last week that this year's Baumer Professor will be Peter Eisenman. As 3+ students we won't see too much of him but he will be conducting seminars for the 6th-year students and also a lecture for the whole school. I believe they will also be doing a source book on one of his works (possibly the Convention Center in Columbus) as a part of the Baumer seminars.

    It will be interesting to see who we will get for our Baumer prof in 6th year. It's my understanding that 5th-year students get to make a wish list for their Baumer professors... past Baumer's have included Hadid, Tschumi, Prix, and plenty of others. Sounds pretty exciting.

    Anyway, the quarter has started off with a bang. Jacquie Gargus sat in on our first two crits in studio and she is absolutely hilarious. Her comments are unfailingly poignant and lucid and she has a great sense of humor. I'm looking forward to having her as a studio prof this year.

    We had a great assignment in Cadwell's Construction I class... we were asked to make a pedestal out of wood, concrete, steel, and glass. We had to reuse the form work elsewhere in our project, use 144 square inches of glass, and keep it under 50lbs. It had to hold a cup of coffee.

    I worked with M. Fairchild on this one, a fellow archinector you may remember from the UC threads... we both changed from UC to OSU at the last minute. So far I can say that neither of us regrets that choice one bit.

    Anyway, we wanted to do a fairly complicated form to explore the use of the concrete. We settled on a general form and then refined it into a snakelike progression of wood and concrete that breaks out of a 9" x 12" x 12" volume to form the platform post.

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    It was interesting to work on the design as a team for the first time. I credit Michael with coming up with the first general form that excited us both, and I take credit for some of the major refinements. But really it was quite a cooperative process. We had a few moments of design sensibility conflict but they didn't last long. It's kind of amazing how two different "opinions" can force you to come up with a solution that is not just a compromise.

     

     
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