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The Design Process

ana!

Hi! I'm an student and just curious to know y'all design process and software workflow, idk to get a different perspective ig? :)

(P.s. for me, its a lot of sketching, then floor plans in autocad, modelling and render in sketchup- enscape, then post render in ps and illustrator)

 
Feb 4, 24 4:22 pm
Non Sequitur

My workflow is whatever works. Could be dozens of sorry bar napkin sketches or maybe I rearrange some books and make a crude model out of pipe cleaners. 3D design eventually evolves to SU, 3DS, or Revit depending on the project and the available fees.  

Feb 4, 24 7:23 pm  · 
 · 
atelier nobody

Every architect should have a good set of blocks...Kids Building Blocks | Montessori Toy

Feb 5, 24 9:39 pm  · 
1  · 
Wood Guy

Lots of sketching to start. Being able to freehand sketch nearly to scale is a very useful skill. I recently got a large iPad and am enjoying using ProCreate for sketching; being able to add many layers and adjust transparency is very helpful.

Once I have a scheme that "has legs," as a mentor used to say, I draft it in Autocad to make sure the floor plan works. It usually needs some tweaking, or sometimes it's not workable and I go back to sketching. 

Once a basic floor plan is worked out I use Autocad and Sketchup to work out sections and exteriors. That always leads back to floor plan adjustments. 

For schematic design I present colorized Autocad floor plans and basic sections, and a Sketchup exterior. I have not gotten into rendering or AI yet and really don't want to but I'm afraid I'll have to before long. 

After schematic design is design development, which I do mostly in Autocad, with varying levels of Sketchup depending on the project. Construction drawings are all Autocad. 

I'm a 50yo residential designer, for what that's worth. 

Feb 6, 24 10:16 am  · 
1  · 
ill_will

Sketching, 3D model, study model, Sketches of study model, Scaled 3D model, calculate cost of physical model costs, physical model, rendering, photoshop, photograph model


Feb 6, 24 10:48 am  · 
1  · 

Hand sketches, then move into some level of BIM once I have an idea of the design.  I'll use BIM to create more refined 3D studies and 'study models'.  Once that is all figured out, and the owner gives their approval I move into refined BIM modeling that will be used for CD's.  

Feb 6, 24 2:01 pm  · 
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TMKH

Typically start with Revit paired with Enscape.  it has taken a while to get fluent enough with the software that the computer doesn't get in the way of the design process.  I typically get push back from my peers until they see how quickly i can move through a design.

This approach has also allowed for me to communicate with the client much better and quicker.  Recently i have also included Midjourney in this process with fascinating results.

i am rarely the individual producing the CD's for projects, but the models i create are typically modeled to LOD 350-400 so the documentation process is much quicker.

Feb 6, 24 6:20 pm  · 
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Non Sequitur

I call bullshit on LOD350-400. No one does that level, even in the full CD phase.

Feb 6, 24 6:48 pm  · 
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sameolddoctor

Stuff "designed" on revit usually looks like it has been. But then again im an old geezer

Feb 7, 24 1:15 am  · 
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