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Has technology made us lazy?

ReneWalton

Hello everyone,
As the title I mentioned, now that technology is advancing, it is undeniable that these developments have helped a lot in our lives. However, the advancement of technology also makes us people more lazy, everything is traded, done online, or indirectly, the encounter between people is less and less. . Do everyone agree with my opinion? Please share your opinion.
Thanks everyone.

 
Apr 19, 21 11:29 pm
citizen

Yes, we've been slacking ever since we learned how to do this:

protect-nick-clark | Fire animation, Fire photography, Fireplace

This is part joke, part truth.  Every major technological advance changes what is routinely possible, and alters habits and abilities as a result.  It's not a new thing.

Apr 20, 21 12:13 am  · 
5  · 
midlander

i'm too busy to be lazy. maybe technology takes up too much of my time to do the important things. like posting facetious answers online instead of reading a book on the subway.

Apr 20, 21 1:39 am  · 
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randomised

.

Apr 20, 21 3:32 am  · 
4  · 
Non Sequitur

I don't know, let me make a make an online poll and I'll get back to you with my "thoughts".

Apr 20, 21 7:51 am  · 
5  · 

Lazy and stupid. Think 'crowdsourcing homework on the internet'.

Apr 20, 21 9:26 am  · 
4  · 
square.

not sure about lazy- we are working more hours than ever, even as our productivity has skyrocketed thanks to technology. call it a contradiction. i definitely agree with the stupid part though....

Apr 20, 21 9:46 am  · 
1  · 
Abie

Yes, we rely on technology too much. It's made our life easier but we get more lazy and dependent about it. 

Apr 20, 21 9:47 am  · 
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Witty Banter

I would disagree about lazy.  As square has stated we've seen education levels, hours worked, and productivity all experience huge increases over the last few decades.  Speaking for Americans, we unequivocally work longer hours for less compensation with a higher degree of training/education than previous generations. Nothing about that demonstrates an increase in "laziness.".  Dependent on technology?  Sure.  Social interactions increasing online and decreasing in person?  Yeah maybe.  Lazy?  No.


Apr 20, 21 9:56 am  · 
3  · 
monosierra

Lazy as in - "Let me photoshop this cool massing and let the technical plebs figure out how to build it" and "If I can model it, someone else can draw it properly".

Apr 20, 21 10:08 am  · 
1  · 
lower.case.yao

It’s only made lazy people more lazy. Tech has empowered even more competent designers and builders.

Apr 20, 21 10:36 am  · 
1  · 
( o Y o )

Tech has "empowered" anyone with a free version of sketchup to be architects.

Apr 20, 21 11:45 am  · 
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SneakyPete

Anyone can make something that resembles a building. It comes from living inside them for most of our waking hours.

Apr 20, 21 1:21 pm  · 
1  · 
SneakyPete

One human's laziness is another human's efficiency. Often the distinguishing characteristic is whether you're already wealthy.

Apr 20, 21 1:20 pm  · 
1  · 

The rich are really efficient at beating down prices and taxes.

Apr 21, 21 12:01 pm  · 
1  · 
JLC-1

first, I don't believe we are "seeing" each other less and less, I for one, have reconnected with mates I hadn't heard off in 30 years thanks to the internet, and what I'm seeing less of is bureaucrats and middle men, I'm totally fine with that, no need to sit for 2 hours to know more about anything they want to sell. 

As for "lazy", I think the real lazy people is the one behind all these new apps, and even more lazy are the giant tech bros that buy these upstarts and make nothing of them but a blend of boring sameness. Other extremely lazy group that have become lazier with technology is the stock market, running on oversensitive algorithms that will one day bring the American economy down to its grave.

Architecture with capital A is not for lazy people, no matter how much 3d glossy surfaces you throw in the mix.

Apr 20, 21 1:28 pm  · 
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quasi-arch

I used to be good at math. Calculus and stuff. Now I NEED a calculator even for simple math. 

Apr 21, 21 10:47 am  · 
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JAK-90825
I disagree that as tech improves we inherently become lazier. For the gains that are made in tech advances, we fill those gaps with more productivity. Our work just moves faster and faster. Old problems are replaced with new problems. Where you were doing 2 or 3 projects a year maybe your now able to do 5 or 6 projects a year. What specific tech would you all think actually does make us lazier?
Apr 21, 21 12:02 pm  · 
3  · 
clevelandcynic

I was going to say the same. As productivity increases with technology, we're expected to output a higher and higher volume of work in the same time frame.

Apr 21, 21 2:52 pm  · 
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clevelandcynic

I'm still a student, not a professional. But even in education, I think this is the case, having talked with my parents about the number and nature of assignments they had in college vs what I have in a typical semester.

Apr 21, 21 2:53 pm  · 
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Because more and faster is always better?

Apr 21, 21 3:00 pm  · 
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clevelandcynic

I mean, no, I don't think so. The question was whether technology makes us "lazier". I'd argue it doesn't. If anything it's given us an excuse to overwork ourselves. But just cuz it hasn't made us lazier doesn't mean it's made us better.

Apr 21, 21 3:10 pm  · 
2  · 
square.

i don't think anyone said this was a positive trend.. who likes working on more projects every year?

Apr 21, 21 4:25 pm  · 
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mightyaa

I would say lazy as it relates to limited skillsets using the tools. By that I mean most people will take an easier path. So, if you want a parabolic curved wall, but you get flustered by your ability to model it with the software… most won’t even bother to try. It isn’t that it can’t be done, it is that it’s a pain to illustrate/engineer it with normal software and skillsets. It’s getting better again as software, presentation, manufacturing, and techniques evolve. The early days of CAD, pre-internet were the dark ages where you were severely limited by software and ability to find those products/companies who could handle custom stuff.  

Apr 22, 21 1:40 pm  · 
1  · 
SneakyPete

The day software can fend off the lawyers so we can collaborate with the trades in order to avoid needing tools that approximate methods that used to be done by skilled workers who handed down said methods generationally is the day we start using them again. We shouldn't be detailing masonry at 3" = 1'-0" when there's an entire trade who know better than we do. We should let the skilled contractors build the vaults without needing to paper the walls with millions of sheets of details that frequently are wrong, but hey, the lawyers and insurance companies demand them. Who are we to argue?

Apr 22, 21 2:22 pm  · 
1  · 
mightyaa

Not sure where you get that insurance and legal push details… The set size comes down to you having tools to easily make details, wanting to justify fees with a large deliverable, and trying to avoid RFI’s and CO’s contractors might seek out which weren’t covered in a less robust set of drawings. It’s architect driven. It’s been an issue forever when selling ‘intellectual’ services is how to justify the time and cost thinking that up… So architects put together massive sets of drawings because clients might believe ‘more drawings = more time & effort’. So you go wild with your section/detail tool creating a lot of repetitive paste & clip details. Example time… the arch somehow f’k up his STC/Rated assembly family group, then repeated that same error across a huge development. The reality is they made one mistake… then used the technology to repeat that mistake on 120 permit sets, each of which calls out that error on at least 8 details. Neither their attorney nor insurance company wants me to be able to reference 960 errors stemming from one family group error. The GC’s attorney is also loving it; they have 960 details showing they assembled exactly what the design professional told them was the requirement. That’s one way being ‘lazy’ with tech can screw ya. It makes it so simple to copy the same error over and over.

Apr 22, 21 4:09 pm  · 
3  · 
SneakyPete

I think it's a disconnect between what happens and what architects BELIEVE happens. Architects frequently think certain things will reduce liability (using bad language like NO EXCEPTIONS TAKEN is a good example) when they don't. That belief causes architects to distrust the contractors and draw too much. The contractors believe that if they make a mistake they'll get sued so they refuse to make decisions without an RFI / ASI. It's a race to the bottom due to fear of liability.

Apr 22, 21 4:58 pm  · 
2  · 

Paper the file. It doesn't matter if the paper is worthless, that's beside the point.

Apr 22, 21 5:15 pm  · 
1  · 
mightyaa

That explains it Sneaky... yep can't disagree with you.

Apr 22, 21 5:28 pm  · 
1  · 
AntonyRudik

If people just could use technologies in a proper way - they would improve their perfomance and make them even more energeticaly powerful. But people prefer to watch useless youtube and play games.


Apr 23, 21 9:42 am  · 
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Non Sequitur

energeticaly powerful? Da fuk?

Apr 23, 21 9:51 am  · 
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SneakyPete

I use my time to trace memes in illustrator, then post them for try-hards to use as pointless braggadocio. You're welcome.

Apr 23, 21 12:17 pm  · 
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I think when the profession went from CAD to Revit we were suddenly asked do do more such as renderings for every room in a basic office or a 3d walk-through for a highway rest stop bathroom. I think technology has moved what the minimum expectations are and the work load has increased a bit.

Over and OUT

Peter N

Apr 23, 21 9:55 am  · 
1  · 
curtkram

i don't add in my head anymore because i have calculators everywhere.  since i'm not practicing this skillset, i'm not good at it.  on the other hand, i'm using that time and brainpower to figure out how to manage worksets and design options in revit.  

if this ever turned into a survey or something, i would be honestly interested in seeing if there is a strong correlation between people who do math in their head and people who can put together a successful set of drawings in a modern context. you can make a legitimate claim that not doing math in our head is a step back, but that's been replaced with an ability to accomplish so much more, such as dropping an enscape flythrough of your highway rest stop bathroom. 

Apr 25, 21 7:34 pm  · 
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