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Undergrad degree (RIBA Part 1 accredited) holder applying to the U.S for M.Arch

DustFlâneur

Hello all,

I am a recent graduate with a RIBA part 1 (undergraduate) degree from the UK. I plan to apply to the US for the M.Arch, but I am a little confused about whether my degree is recognised as a professional degree in the US. So, would I be applying to the M.Arch I programme (which applies specifically to those with generic undergraduate degrees or pre-professional architectural degree) or the M.Arch II programme (which applies to those with a professional undergraduate degree in architecture)? 

And, if it is the latter, is it uncommon to find fresh graduates in the M.Arch II programme? Is it usually expected that M.Arch II applicants have a few years of work experience before applying? 

I am planning to send out applications to Columbia GSAPP and Yale, so I am wondering whether it is usually easier to get into M.Arch I or M.Arch II? And, are there any applicants who have a similar undergraduate degree from the UK and have then applied to M.Arch in the US, who would be willing to share their experience of applying to the US?

Thanks!

 
Oct 29, 20 1:24 pm
TED

You should apply for MArch II as RIBA Part 1 is a professional degree. Helps also if you have a 1st from a great programme. It is always better to have real life experience prior to entering US Graduate programs as it helps you shape where you want to go with your research. 

Oct 30, 20 5:20 am  · 
 · 
luvu

RIBA Part 1 is a PRE-professional degree (part II is). Generally M.Arch II is for those who already have a 5-year B.Arch or Prof. M Arch. 

The OP / finish your professional degree whether it's in the UK/US... I highly doubt the intensity/value of the post-profession masters

Nov 1, 20 10:00 pm  · 
 · 
TED

Depends on Uni - You are correct for Yale 

 · 
DustFlâneur

Can I ask whether you are absolutely sure that the RIBA Part 1 is a pre-professional degree? I ask because I've tried emailing the schools I am applying to (Columbia, Harvard and Yale), but nobody has been able to answer my question properly...

 · 
lower.case.yao

I highly doubt schools will accept the RIBA part 1 ( 3 years of education only) as a professional degree. The M.Arch is equivalent to RIBA part 1 and 2 (total 5 years).

 · 
DustFlâneur

I did an MA architecture degree, which is four years (since its in Scotland) so I'm wondering if that makes any difference....

 · 
lower.case.yao

I think they'll see it as any other non-b.arch degree. You should apply for the M.arch I.

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TED

Columbia has it on their website that you can apply for advanced standing. Probably similar for GSD and Yale - There is a Q+A admissions live webinar at Columbia so have a look.

In the US 'Professional Degree' is very specific and means you are able to sit for NCARB - in the UK Part I is a professional degree but not by US standards.

____________________________

(1) Advanced placement into the second year of the MArch program

A student who is admitted into the second year of the M.Arch. Program may receive advanced standing for the first-year courses including the two design studios (potentially 36 points)

M.Arch applicants who have completed, or are about to complete, an undergraduate degree in a non-professional program in architecture may apply for advanced standing into the second year class. Advanced placement is determined after a complete review of the applicant’s portfolio, transcripts, and relevant course syllabi by the admissions committee. Applicants who are granted advanced placement must have undergraduate courses that are roughly analogous to the course of study of the first year of the graduate program, demonstrating high achievement in design. Advanced standing applicants may be eligible to receive up to 36 credits counted toward their degree, allowing a student to complete the degree in as few as two years. Accepted students who affirmed in their application that they wish to be evaluated for advancement into the third semester will be notified of advanced standing status in their letters of admission


Nov 13, 20 4:21 am  · 
1  · 
DustFlâneur

Thanks—this is very helpful!

1  · 

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