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Abuse in Architecture Schools?

369
HootienBlowfish

"these properties of ownership by human cargo or indentured servants." There are the Chosen Ones who are hand-picked by voracious studio critics. I know some folks who worked for GSD instructors over the summer on stipend or hourly. Stipend meant that the poor vassal would be expected to work day n night. Even folks I know were never reimbursed for their efforts. Therefore, the instructors have a leg-up in all the work they do--- renders for design competitions, etc. The hours aren't accounted for, the bills aren't paid. This is LA-LA land. This cycle and system ain't sustainable. It doesn't show the rest of us plebes a realistic picture of what being an architect is actually like.  

Jul 24, 18 8:33 pm
Xenakis

architecture school has to be that way because this is a ruthless profession - no rest for the weary - and fools aren't suffered lightly

only the talented, the rest will be BIM serfs

Jul 25, 18 12:27 pm
heeroyui

It doesn't have to be if we had proper representation from our Lobbying organization AIA and NCARB .

HootienBlowfish

Lol what does being a fool mean?

HootienBlowfish

Right ncarb seems to be trying but. Anyone do 5.0?

Featured Comment
3tk

-Is there abuse at Arch schools, whether done to you or observed being done to others? 

Yes, mostly verbal (belittling, yelling), occasional unwanted sexual advances.  Somewhat depended on school, I felt the two institutions attended were good at keeping abusive behavior to a minimum through senior faculty leadership.

-Architecture School is : a fun place to explore greater implications of design and expand my intellectual curiosity and skill sets

-If you could change 1 thing about Arch School, what would it be?

More engagement with related fields - a lot of students try to reinvent the wheel instead of finding better applications of existing research/materials/methods/etc.

-Is the crit culture of assailing student with negative feedback useful or ineffective?

'negative' maybe not 'critical/constructive' definitely.  I've had the experience where praise is more common than criticism which I found to be a useless activity in academia.  That being said, on the instructor side, sometimes you do have to wield a stick along with the carrot.

-How long did it take you to recover, mentally, psychologically, socially etc, after graduating from Arch School? 

I pushed a bit far on my thesis toward the end and burned out hard.  Six months to physically recover, nine to get mentally readjusted to society.  That being said, it has made me far more resilient in the work place.

=-Could one go as far as to say that some people have PTSD as a result of Arch School?

For some, yes.  Especially in my graduate program a lot of students with non-architecture backgrounds had no idea what they got into and became shell shocked.  It seems for some of them it took a few years to really gain perspective.

Jul 25, 18 1:03 pm
HootienBlowfish

And point these comments are really helpful. There is totally a shellshocked non-Architecture background reaction. I was one of those types. It’s like they toss you in to military service without Boot Camp.

HootienBlowfish

So apparently it sucks over in the UK for architecture grads: 

https://www.architectsjournal....

Aug 9, 18 1:09 pm
randomised

One-in-three architecture students reporting more stress-related mental health problems ≠ one-in-three architecture students suffering from stress-related mental health problems...

1likejam

very true. I am from the UK, and I remember design tutors telling students to get a doctors note for an extension using mental health as a reason.

HootienBlowfish

Right, a lot don’t report, and also we don’t know the severity of the mental health issues.


And if this is any yardstick, the GSD sends a higher percentage of students To mental health services than any other Harvard school, by a long shot.

Aug 9, 18 9:10 pm
randomised

But also people might report issues that wouldn't be considered mental health issues, no? Just because people report stuff doesn't mean it is true?

HootienBlowfish

Sure. But we haven't even spoken about disability. That deserves another forum. Disability now includes by government definition: 1/mobility (ie wheelchair-bound) 2/sensorial (ie blindness or hard of hearing) 3/brain-based (learning disability, autism). According to ADA definitions, 26% of the US has a disability. This is not a "them" issue, it's an "us" issue. Same with mental illness--it touches all of us whether indirectly or directly. Chronic stress can lead to anxiety disorders, which I'm sure goes undiagnosed a boatload. Then there's the other question: To what degree does architecture school trigger mental illness, or intensify the issue? I'm sure some folks arrived in arch school already with a mental illness. Then there's the ENVIRONMENT/TEMPORARY: Various effective disorders arise for the duration of the program, then fade away (or not?) afterwards. Some may be scarred for life. Then I've heard of people with mental disorder say to me they never pursued Architecture school, even though they loved the profession, since they were sure that the stress would send them over the edge. I DO think that brain-based disability should be treated the same as mobility and sensorial disability. If there are structures that exclude whole groups of people then that's actually in violation of ADA. It would behoove administrations to address this now, if they want to protect themselves from litigation, etc. And gaslighting and/or naivete of the administration has to stop. Case in point: Harvard GSD upper person (4th floor baby!) actually told a student who reported sexual harassment and abuse that "they had never heard of x, y, z actions, it's just never something they have ever seen." It's not a ghost she's describing for christssake! At the very least haven't they watched drama/thrillers/law and order, etc? Grossly irresponsible. It's gotta stop now, and at the very least the schools should host open discussions. 

mantaray

One great thing about residual PTSD from architecture school:

Literally all of life after has felt like a cakewalk in comparison.  Recession layoffs?  No problem, I can adapt and reinvent.  Living through house renovations / sleeping on janky sofa in lead-filled dusty room?  Still more sanitary than naps under my studio desk.  Newborn in the house?  Meh -- I still got more sleep than I ever did in architecture school.  Newborn AND preschooler in the house?  Yep, STILL got more sleep than in architecture school!

Aug 10, 18 3:08 pm
mantaray

My partner is ex-military and has a similar feeling relative to boot camp. However, boot camp is only 90 days! I suffered through the shit for 5 years, man. It definitely toughens you up!

HootienBlowfish

LOL I would say your production of newborn is more incredible than any 3D printed model or parametric make 2D drawing that is being pumped out as we speak...at 4 in the morning.

Xenakis

mantaray

I went to architecture school in San Diego where the Marines and SEALs influence the work ethic there - Jurors would get in your face "What is your major malfunction?"

Aug 10, 18 4:07 pm
randomised

So you've been trained to be the architectural equivalent of cannon fodder, explains it all...

HootienBlowfish

HA! And then many architects are simply sheep, so they decide to continue in their own teaching, and again and again ad nauseum. Which professors (you don't have to name names) are wonderful human beings?

HootienBlowfish

Wouldn't the beach chill them out a bit?

moirabroon

I wrote about cruelty I experienced at architecture school  in a book called BRICK WALL (by Moira M. Malcolm). Problem is architecture course is totally subjective, tutors pluck random numbers out of air (based on no set criteria) and some students hand in drawings done off campus BY QUALIFIED ARCHITECTS. Avoid at all costs if you want to stay mentally healthy.

Jun 24, 19 5:34 pm
Non Sequitur

Cool story bro, but perhaps it’s because you went to shit school or you yourself were a shit student? I know it’s easier to just throw everything in a nice convenient box and label it, but it’s not that simple. Plenty of decent schools with happy and successful students out there.

moirabroon

Your nasty reply demonstrates all that is wrong in architecture education. Your assessment of me is based on no evidence whatsoever, but yet you come to the conclusion you must have gone to a better school than me and been a superior student. Arrogance personified! theappealofarchitecture.blogspot.com/2017/08/views-of-people-who-have-contacted-me.html

Non Sequitur

Incorrect. One person's experience does not mean everything is terrible. Also, perhaps you should refer to archinect's advertisement policies before plugging your book in a nearly 1y long dead zombie jesus thread.

moirabroon

Hardly one person’s experience judging by the thread.

Non Sequitur

But still too small a sample to make broad generalizations and "avoid at all costs" type remarks.

moirabroon

I do not promote my book for my own gain, and nor did I write it from my own gain. I am trying to save a few lives. I have done extensive research on the subject. There is an appendix in the book with the views of praticising architects and former students (some are included on the blog link I included earlier) - the General consensus is that the system of educating architects needs a massive overhaul because it is largely based on the opinions and prejudices of tutors BASED ON NO SET CRITERIA. Tutors can just randomly fail anyone who annoys them - and they do. All the time.

moirabroon

I do not promote my book for my own gain, and nor did I write it from my own gain. I am trying to save a few lives. I have done extensive research on the subject. There is an appendix in the book with the views of praticising architects and former students who (some are included on the blog link I included earlier) - that the system of educating architects needs a massive overhaul because it is largely based on the opinions and prejudices of tutors BASED ON NO SET CRITERIA. Tutors can just randomly fail anyone who annoys them - and they do. All the time.

randomised

But Moira, the book you're trying to plug here is about cruelty YOU perceived at architecture school (your words) making it the subjective account of ONE person, namely you. If architecture school should be avoided at all costs, how should architects be trained and educated? It's not a problem that architecture is subjective, that's what makes it so great, because people, future clients all have different needs and wishes too, very subjective. Those clients might pluck some random numbers out of air (based on no set criteria) and the architect will have to work with it. Some architects even have their drawings done by qualified staff, OMG! You're painting with a brush that's way too broad, be more specific. What cruelty? Details...

moirabroon

It's too easy to hit the wrong key on an ipad. I'll give up now. Goodbye.

Non Sequitur

That is a grossly incorrect extrapolation and if that's your conclusion, then you do not understand the meaning of extensive research. The education curriculum does need some drastic fine-tuning, but not in the way you're hinting at (it needs a greater variety of prof-prac and technical coursework, not easier studios). Design education will always be arbitrary so expecting a convenient set of rules to establish success (pass or fail) will never work. If you want that, go to an engineering school. The difficulty with architecture education is explaining to students that they need to present ideas and answer to criticism, not be told what to do and get a shinny star for following a set path. That's high-school stuff.

Start your own discussion thread in the forum separate from this zombie-Jesus thread if you want to bracket your opinion against others.  There are hundreds and hundreds of arch schools out-there.  Most are pumping out serviceable grads without issue. 

moirabroon

I have been to three architecture schools in the UK and have seen a lot of unnecessary cruelty. People have written to me from all over the world, and it's much the same everywhere - random marking based on no set criteria whatsoever. I'm glad you think that's okay. It shouldn't be a subject in a university if this is not possible. my blog

Non Sequitur

Hilarious. And also, your understanding of cruel is a fucking joke. Boo-who, the teacher does not like my drawings. Mommy told me they were great, why am I not getting the 95% I deserve?

randomised

Moira, if you already give up replying so easily, just because of a stupid iPad, no wonder you had trouble in archi school ;-) (drops mic)

moirabroon

I'm at my main computer now. Non Sequitur, you say, "The difficulty with architecture education is explaining to students..." Are you employed in architecture education by any chance?

Non Sequitur

I am not employed in academia. I am a licensed practicing architect.

SneakyPete

And now that you've disagreed with him, you'll probably be banned. One person said so, which makes it true.

tduds

The existence of people who've been failed by the system does not mean that the system is broken. Also, the fact that the system is not broken doesn't invalidate the experience of people who have been failed. You're arguing non-intersecting tangents. 

Maybe the system is broken. I'd personally disagree, but I'm open to reading something that might change my mind and I'm quite fond of changing my mind when something sways me. This book doesn't seem like that kind of book, though.

moirabroon

I wrote, "15 reasons NOT to study architecture" too. It's made up of little essays which might sway you. my blog

Formerlyunknown

Architecture is not the field for everyone. What field is? Most of the reasons in your "15 reasons" seem laughably ridiculous to me (you have to lug around too much stuff? some people cheat in college? you might cry? you have to draw bricks? you'll never get a decent job unless you're rich and have family connections?)   But, I have a decent job despite no family wealth or connections, don't mind drawing bricks, didn't cheat in college or get too unhinged about those who did, and I lug around less stuff than when I worked various other types of jobs. If these issues seem hugely important or insurmountable to anyone, then it's true they probably shouldn't go into the field.

Non Sequitur

The blog is bias, the research sampling is poor, the conclusion is shit, the author is incapable of critical thinking, the list goes on. Good thing arch school weeds out the week ones. We have enough trouble getting good staff, can't imagine the likes of her watering down the talent pool even more.

5839

It's a sad book, about a lonely student who has trouble keeping friends, keeping up, fitting in, finding her way, and who feels left behind on weekends and such. It's not particularly informative, as it's very dated (set in the mid 1980s) both about the architecture schools and about social isolation. I enjoyed it somewhat, by imagining the whole thing as a John Hughes movie set in architecture school - but I wouldn't recommend it as at all relevant for anyone considering entering the profession today.

moirabroon

Granted some of the points aren't completely serious. You must agree that projects are randomly marked though, based on no set criteria. Students are kept anxious until the very end as marks awarded for project work throughout the year are disregarded and a random mark plucked from the sky, based on no set criteria is given. 

Non Sequitur

That's not how grading works and that's not how design in academia is reviewed. There are more pieces than you're willing to admit because it will force you to reconsider your terrible "cruel" conclusion.

5839

What she's describing is a way that some architecture programs operated decades ago. It was a double-jeopardy system where the studio critic's grades for the projects weren't the final word - there was also an end-of-semester or end-of-year class review where a larger group of faculty and visiting critics would grade the work in the students' absence, and that grade would be the final semester's grade or factor into it (depending on the program). In the US NAAB hasn't allowed that system since the late 1980s. She's talking about her experience in Scotland in the 80s - I don't know if that's still happening that way now there.

Non Sequitur

Also worth mentioning that I've never seen an arch studio where the criteria for grades and project evaluation were not outlined within the first day of class.

RickB-Astoria

moira, every person's experience of architecture is unique. Many share similarities in both good and not so good experiences. Many also share differences as well. It isn't something to stereotype which is what is effectively what you are doing by painting a picture of architecture schools being like what you experienced. It may not be your intent but the effective result of how you communicate. Even the same school isn't the same experience every year or always. What experience that you may have had over a decade ago.... more closer to 3 decades ago is not going to be quite the same experience people today are going to experience. Many of the people that were there would be gone for a variety of reasons but commonly.... retirement. So lets be honest about chronological relevancy. There was problems, sure. Over the decades, a lot of such problematic issues had been brought out into the spot light and addressed to some extent. It should be noted as a disclaimer that some of these experience may or may not be experienced by you but on occassion may appear and should not be allowed to be tolerated and be aware of if they do show up in someone else's live in similar ways. However, it isn't something that should be painted as that is how architecture school is.

JLC-1

I had classmates whose parents were architects, (oh, surprise) they had an upper leg in most subjects and studio, but instead of bashing them or being envious, I managed to get closer to them to learn some trade tricks that were not taught in school. It's tough, not for everybody, exhausting - but it's not abuse, it's so far the only way we have found to transmit some kind of knowledge in a discipline that is not scientific in nature, and can accept a lot more than one answer to a specific problem.

SpontaneousCombustion

I'm not going to purchase any of this woman's books despite this thinly veiled spam, but I read the Amazon previews and they all share the same theme: she's unhappy and people won't hang out with her because of her negativity. In the one about moving to Switzerland her friends drop her because all she does is rant about how awful Switzerland is. In the one about going to architecture school her classmates ditch her because all she does is complain about architecture school. Who knew this was a successful self-publishing strategy? I'm going to get started right away on my book of how I went to culinary school and everybody avoided me because I hate cooking, and then... the sky's the limit, I hate so many things! Saxophones, golf, Canada...

moirabroon

Out of interest, have you written anything?

Non Sequitur

Hey, what's wrong with Canada, Sponty?

SpontaneousCombustion

Too much government oversight. It should be my choice if I want to eat trans fats in restaurants and buy a used mattress. Also too many caribou. Wow this book's almost writing itself.

Non Sequitur

Buying used mattresses is illegal here? I did not know. I learned something today. Hopefully so did Moira.

moirabroon

RickB-Astoria, Granted the last time I was in an architecture school was 1995 and it was Newcastle University. But the only reason I keep trying to get the word out is that I hear from students who are suffering in the system today. The only thing that seems to have changed since I was there is that they have done away with written exams, making the course entirely subjective, instead of just 95% subjective. If you know of any school which marks project work against set criteria please let me know and I will stop annoying the President of the RIBA.

You're not going to challenge that and make Sponty post multiple sources backing up that used mattress claim!? Come on people, this is how dumpster fires are born. ... or do I need an extra 'u' in there for Canada? Bourn? Borne? Bourne? Jason Bourne? Matt Damon? 

[gasp] 

Matt Damon sells illegal mattresses in Canada!

RickB-Astoria

Art consists of a lot of subjectivity by the nature of art and art is a major part of architecture. Architecture is a field that embodies art and science. 


Non Sequitur

Matt Damon is literally the slap-chop guy here in Canada, but for used mattresses.

Non Sequitur

...and for what it's worth Moira, your "knowledge" of the teaching of architecture is pathetically flawed and incorrect. You're too dense to realize this tho and certainly will keep on fighting this invisible bogey-man.

moirabroon

There is no teaching done in architecture. That is the point - only lazy teaching through criticism (which you’d be good at!) and giving students random numbers based on their likes and prejudices.

Non Sequitur

there is plenty of teaching. See my previous statement about your lack of knowledge. Again, you have literally no concept of the subject you're attacking here.

moirabroon

Peter Eisenmann, now he’s good, “If you put a monkey in front of a typewriter......” He’s teaching a lot!,,, http://theappealofarchitecture.blogspot.com/p/eisenmann-debates-wolf-d-prix-at-crit.html

moirabroon

Peter Eisenmann, now he’s good, “If you put a monkey in front of a typewriter......” He’s teaching a lot!,,, http://theappealofarchitecture.blogspot.com/p/eisenmann-debates-wolf-d-prix-at-crit.html

Non Sequitur

Old news and not relevant but I can see you're a fan of cherry-picking examples to suit your delusions.

randomised

"You must agree that projects are randomly marked though, based on no set criteria."

Moira, that's not how grading works, at all. The times I failed classes it was totally deserved and not random at all because of some silly preferences of the tutors, not saying that they don't have those, they are human after all.

tduds

Again I'm sorry you have a bad experience Moira, but you seem a little too eager to extrapolate that experience into other schools, nations, and even decades. And without even an attempt at compiling research (Disgruntled students who seek you out because of shared experience is not research) you're not likely to prove anything to anyone. 

Seems like you have a conclusion in mind, in order to make you feel better, and you've spent a solid chunk of your life clinging to whatever justifies it, at the expense of everything else.

Non Sequitur

I wonder if her next book will just be all these responses copy-pasted.

moirabroon

tduds, don’t worry about me I have a full life. I just try to campaign for change from time to time. This is what an architect wrote on Amazon.ca “Moira's experience makes me sad and a bit ashamed to be an architect, if the profession treats even one person this way. If there is any positive outcome to be considered, it is that the education of architects needs a major overhaul.“ Not everyone is as small-minded as those trying to belittling me on this thread and many traumatized students are grateful to know they are not alone.

Non Sequitur

We're not trying to belittle you. We're trying to educate you.

moirabroon

Educate by belittling = architecture education.

Non Sequitur

Again, grossly incorrect.

tduds

Nothing wrong with a support group, but not everybody needs one.

moirabroon

All RIBA validated schools operate roulette marking. It is not possible to become an architect without going to an RIBA validated school. It sounds like you were one of the lucky ones and the gate-keepers let you through. But I wonder how many clever, creative, young people would want to set foot in an architecture school if they knew their entire future EARNINGS were based on luck - and being liked by a handful of arrogant, middle-aged white men. Women tutors still few and far between in arch school and this thread show male, macho bullying is still the norm.

Non Sequitur

Zero luck is required. Again, try and educate yourself. Your bias and ignorance is preventing you from making intelligent comments.

tduds

"It is not possible to become an architect without going to an RIBA validated school." ...except in every single other country.

tduds

I'm gonna back out of this thread. It's getting too off-topic. 

Bottom line: there are absolutely problems within the architecture community and especially within architectural education. Toxic environments exist, sexism & racism exist, gate-keeping and overworking / underpaying exist. All of these are very real problems facing the profession - but I'd push back on two things. 1) These issues don't *define* the profession. Moira's experience is not unique but it's also not common. and 2) The reasons she identifies and the complaints she has are not - in my opinion - reflective of the actual problems I identified above. Nor are her proposed solutions likely to address the actual problems I identified above. 

I don't want to give the impression that I'm defending the status quo. I simply think Moira comes off as rather jaded because of her personal experience, & is barking up the wrong tree when it comes to influencing change in the profession / community.

moirabroon

5839, aren't you vindictive - leaving that childish review of my autobiographical book BRICK WALL on Amazon. You must feel better now.

Non Sequitur

Shitty work by a disgruntled and misinformed “author”. One bad review is just adding to the pile of manure.

randomised

Quite ironic Moria, how one person’s vindictive account of architecture school is apparently the norm and is turned into a book whereas one person’s account of that book is met with harsh criticism and deemed childish...it seems like someone held up a mirror, like what you see?

Non Sequitur

^also incorrect. AlinaF is just as clueless and disgruntled as The op.

Non Sequitur

Don’t care about gas and never said anything about it. Just poking holes in the Op’s POV. Try to keep up.

Non Sequitur

*gsa. Stupid phone.

Non Sequitur

That’s was a comment made prior to knowing the op’s history. Doesn’t not change the fact that the op was a shitty student and who still has not moved on. Again, try to keep up. The grown ups are talking here.

Non Sequitur

Not likely.

RickB-Astoria

AlinaF, why would a Canadian go to a UK school to meet the licensing requirements in Canada? The schools in the UK would not equal an NAAB accredited school in the U.S. for licensing requirements in the U.S. and probably not even in Canada's CACB accreditation requirements.

randomised

Alina...you have to agree it is ironic. One person’s experience of arch school versus one person’s experience of that book about one person’s experience of arch school. Of all people, I thought you would get that ;)

moirabroon

Granted my experience is one example, but many people have dreadful experiences at architecture school - experiences they feel they will never recover from - both mentally and financially. A lengthy appendix gives the opinions of current practicing architects and students in the system today. The system has always been, AND STILL IS, incredibly open to abuses of power. It’s a strange person who doesn’t want to introduce a bit of fairness to the system eg. some drawings could be done under exam conditions. Project work could be marked against set criteria, reducing subjectivity. These things are not difficult to implement, but there seems to be resistance from lazy, illogical, authoritarian individuals at the helm of architecture education.

Non Sequitur

Give it a rest. You’ve not defended your position and the horse has long been beaten to death.

Bloopox

Individual experiences are valuable. Unfortunately most people who are happier with their academic and professional experiences don't dwell on them enough to feel compelled to self-publish an autobiography, so the first-hand accounts available - on any field of study or profession - tend to skew toward those who had unhappy experiences. As long as the reader understands that - and the inevitable anachronistic nature of a a first-hand account written 30 years later - then this book probably can be useful to some, especially in determining whether they have the personality type and priorities to deal with studying architecture.

It's clear from this book, and just as much from the one about the author's experiences in Switzerland, and even from her replies on Amazon to some of her reviewers, that she really appreciates and feels better working within well-defined, familiar, and fixed parameters. A lot of people with that personality type do have huge challenges with architecture school - and even more so with working in the profession - because architectural projects don't fall neatly within those parameters. Some people with that personality type do make great architects - it's not that I'd want all of them to be scared out of it - but I think this book would help some with the decision.

Another thing that a young student could learn would be to do more to know much more about what they're getting into when picking not only a career direction but a school. The author's frustrations not only with the format and grading policies of architecture education, but with shabby student housing, athletic facilities that aren't open to those in all programs, etc. are things that one should make themselves aware of before choosing the program. Naturally this is easier in the age of the internet, but it's still too common to hear of students who knew virtually nothing about the university or the critical, subjective nature of architecture school until they arrived. Even though this story is quite dated and in some ways not at all representative of architecture schools today, it might spur others to visit architecture schools, sit in on crits, talk to other current students about their experiences, etc. before they commit to attending any particular school.


tduds

Well said, Bloopox

RickB-Astoria

Even in the age of internet, not everything is told or revealed. Yes, school, careers, etc. can be like roses. There's the flower but also beware of the thorns. It isn't all just the flower and sunshine. There are also the thorns. Beware that is reality. Sure we can do things to improve the culture of this field but this takes time and a collective will to change.

randomised

Moira, did you sell any books since you started posting here?

Xenakis

Like I've said before, it's like the Marines, only the few - if you think school is tough, wait until you graduate and get a job at a big office working 14 hour days, 6 days a week, sometimes 7, with the PMs and PAs on your neck ("I need you to work late") If I had a dollar for every time I heard that.

Jun 25, 19 12:17 pm
Non Sequitur

I get several hundred dollars whenever I hear those words. 8-)

But the vast majority of offices run typical 40ish weeks.  Your experience is not typical.

tduds

Yeah... this doesn't align with my experience. Long days a few times a year to meet a deadline? Sure. Perpetual overtime and weekend work? Time to find a new job.

randomised

Ever heard of Stockholm Syndrome Xenakis?

archiwutm8

I have issues with people like you Xenakis, you normalise abuse and depression making it acceptable and just a way of life.

midlander

the marines support their own. this doesn't sound like the experience of you or anyone else in our profession. nor should it be.

Xenakis

Stockholm Syndrome,

Maybe - I always work in high demand firms, fast paced, chasing deadlines - impatient PMs - that's the way it is in Multi-family - I'm trying to get back into Type I

Jun 25, 19 4:20 pm
randomised

Work smarter not harder, stand up for yourself...

jla-x

Not a way to live man. My dad busted his ass at a job he hated for his whole life...retired finally at 68 with barely enough money to get by...within a month was diagnosed with a serious medical condition. You need to live for today.

tintt

We had an assignment due the first day of class. You were supposed to hear about it through the grapevine. I always figured they were grading you on how connected you were/if you were in a frat. About 13 people out of 60 some didn't come to class the first day with their work done. I do hope they get rid of that and realize these are the exact kind of practices that keep the profession white, male, and privileged.  

Jul 1, 19 11:39 am
tduds

What an extremely dumb assignment.

moirabroon

Nothing surprises me. Architecture tutors can do what they like. They are answerable to no one. Some are quite twisted individuals, yet you can’t become an architect unless your PERSONALITY is approved of by them.

Non Sequitur

Are you still on this Moira? We’ve already told you countless times that that is incorrect. Find another hobby.

tduds

"Architecture tutors can do what they like. They are answerable to no one." ...yeah this is rarely the case.

tintt

My personality was not on the approved list. Yet, here I am.

Non Sequitur

Tint, out very first 1st drawing studio assignment was given to the class 1 week (or so) before the start of the semester during orientation. Students had to choose between course work or frosh week drinking. At least everyone was told of the work tho. Secret assignments just sounds wrong.

tintt

It's possible I'm remembering it wrong too.

Xenakis

It's part of the preparation - to survive and thrive in architecture, you must figure out what is going on, don't expect to be informed information, it doesn't work that way - secret assignments? I remember that, and would be curious enough to go find out from others - it pays off in practice - your PM doesn't always have time to communicate to the team the latest changes. Be pro-active

Jul 1, 19 2:12 pm
SneakyPete

How do you have such contradicting opinions? You complain about the work load, then suggest people go find more work to do...?

Steeplechase

No! This is just another case of you excusing being treated as garbage. It is a project leader’s job to communicate changes with their team.

Xenakis

I've worked at many offices where we are expected to be proactive about finding out what is going on "do your home work" It really pays off to get your staff to figure things out and ask the right people.

the leaders are often too busy, in meetings, out of the office, whatever 

Jul 1, 19 4:51 pm

It what way would it pay off to have staff guessing at what they can work on next?

No, I'd say this is a form of gaslighting the office's production staff because it has terrible managers supervising the production staff. Also, this is not normal in architecture.

Steeplechase

At s you have to work weekends because you’re wasting so much time during the week figuring things out?

tduds

Taking initiative and solving your own problems are one thing. Guessing about ill-defined projects or "secret" assignments is a very poor way to manage your workforce.

Susz

+EA +Tduds It’s one thing to know how to handle downtime or the natural fluctuations of projects, or have a key mentor in the firm, it’s another thing entirely not to be able to rely on mgmt...to do their job...

username_af

Architecture school is one of the most unique educational experiences one could have. Getting to know your classmates through hours at the studio, late night runs to whatever 24 hr food spots there are, learning to present your ideas visually and verbally, learning new skills from your classmates, etc. are some of the positives. 

If you could change 1 thing about Arch School, what would it be? The level of competition between students. In my experience this was never deliberate, but the collateral damage of being in the same space with the same people for weeks on end & working on the same project. It is inevitable that we look at each others screens, compare ourselves and sometimes spend more time trying to one-up each other than focus on the projects. 

I would also change the mindset that 'design is king'. Yes, design is up there in terms of importance, but I wish I was taught project management, how to speak with clients, how to design buildings your developer will agree to, etc. 

Is the crit culture of assailing student with negative feedback useful or ineffective? Both. It is useful in that it pushes you to a place where you learn to present your ideas clearly, beautifully and succinctly. It teaches you to be prepared for the kind of conversations you will likely have in boardrooms once you graduate. 

It is ineffective when you come into it with a defensive attitude where you are defending your project more than having a dialogue about its strengths and weaknesses. Let's be honest, in the real world projects take years to finish, so there is no way anyone's designed something perfect in 10 weeks. 

I've learned that, sometimes, by being open with the critics about a portion of the project that you may be a little unsure about, they may actually provide kind and incredibly open feedback as opposed to criticism. The key here is that the rest of your portfolio has to be well thought out!

How long did it take you to recover, mentally, psychologically, socially etc, after graduating from Arch School? This depends on your personality time and how much of it you internalize vs. learn to deal with and grow from. 

Could one go as far as to say that some people have PTSD as a result of Arch School? I don't know anyone that has. 

Aug 7, 19 10:16 am

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