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Decent desktop PC for Revit?

Feb 22 '14 12 Last Comment
ElGrecus
Feb 22, 14 4:25 am

So the title pretty much says it all. It doesn't have to be the highest end machine in the world. I just want to work on Revit at home and not have it be too slow. The Revit models I work on can get big, say... 200 MB. I've seen people recommending BOXX computers but the price is high. Any suggestions for a good machine that will run the latest Revit nicely without costing a fortune? I don't think I have the time to build one myself. Thanks.

 

gruen
Feb 22, 14 9:13 am

I don't have an answer but I am interested in the answers. Finding a fast computer w good memory isn't hard but the video card is. Are there any gaming cards that are fast but cost less than the graphics workstation cards?

sameolddoctor
Feb 23, 14 1:47 am

Gruen, Gaming cards work JUST FINE for revit, rhino, maya, cinema4d etc. especially the high end ones.

Cybertron makes some great pcs

http://www.cybertronpc.com/home~cat~gamers.htm

Sagar ChitrakarSagar Chitrakar
Feb 23, 14 11:06 pm

Hey there,

One way of reducing the size of Revit files are linking different elements into the main file. But even if you that, I know it's a bit heavy.

I was trying to build workstation for my self and did some survey; stumble upon this website which was the best and most helpful. Do have a look.


http://pcfoo.com/mid-range-workstation/

ElGrecus
Feb 23, 14 11:31 pm

Thanks for the replies. I would build my own but I am overloaded with work. There is not enough time to spend putting one together. The link from Sagar is helpful though is sorting out different components.

I have been looking at https://www.maingear.com/ (the "F131" model) and http://www.falcon-nw.com/ (the "Potenza" model). I can get a pretty loaded system (i7 processor, 16 GB ram (2x8GB) and an NVIDIA® GeForce™ GTX 750 Ti 2GB GDDR5 graphics card for under about $1,800. That seems like a decent deal to me. Or could I get something cheaper elsewhere?

sameolddoctor
Feb 24, 14 12:17 am

check out cybertron, i think they have a comparable system for 1650

sameolddoctor
Feb 24, 14 12:19 am

Oh, and please be sure to get a SSD for the primary hard drive, makes a huge difference, and if you are just getting 16gb ram, make sure you have two more slots to fill later. RAM keeps getting cheaper - so make sure to know how much the max RAM your mobo can support...

ElGrecus
Feb 24, 14 10:31 am

Sameolddoctor: do you really feel an SSD hard drive is essential? I hate the idea of paying more for less space. At work we save our Revit files across a network and I doubt they have 30 TB of SSD hard drive on it. It's not the absolute fastest setup, but not too slow either. If others feel an SSD is required I will definitely consider it.

curtkram
Feb 24, 14 10:47 am

ssd is for your operating system and things like page files.  you would get second big platter drive to store files on. 

ElGrecus
Feb 24, 14 10:59 pm

I see. So a 256 GB SSD would be enough for the the operating system then, and a 1 or 2 TB HD for other files. That seems doable.

sameolddoctor
Feb 25, 14 12:43 am

Yes, SSD is for OS and Programs. I had a 4-year old workstation, and just putting a new SSD into it made it run a hundred times better...

gruen
Feb 26, 14 8:21 am

Doctor, when you suggest a high end gaming card, can you give some specific ones?

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