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Cookie-cutter - Taboo to say in an arch. office??

May 21 '13 14 Last Comment
hirammrom
May 21, 13 2:13 pm

Just heard it and it made me cringe.

I've always thought of that type of work contradictory to the type of work a "design" architect would do but I guess someone's gotta do the dirty work right?

I guess I'll just have to accept the fact that you have to start somewhere - even if it means baking cookies for a year or two...

 

marisco
May 21, 13 4:05 pm

Just because something is designed as a pattern (cookie cutter) does not mean that you cannot use your skills to design it intelligently. Take it as a design challenge to make a better cookie cutter. 

observant
May 21, 13 4:10 pm

Just because something is designed as a pattern (cookie cutter) does not mean that you cannot use your skills to design it intelligently. Take it as a design challenge to make a better cookie cutter. 

Agreed.  Most offices are open to slightly modifying something cookie cutter if it makes the design better ... and doesn't blow the budget.  However, with boilerplates and standard details, it makes no sense to reinvent the wheel unless codes have rendered them outdated.

Kevin W.Kevin W.
May 21, 13 4:48 pm

Standardization = profit.

bowling_ball
May 21, 13 5:31 pm

I've worked in an office where everything was redesigned for each project (boutique firm) and in a corporate office where standard layouts, patterns (and to some extent, details) are reused where they make sense - which is a balance between hours spent / profitability and the apparent quality of design.  You can guess which firm is profitable, and which isn't.

I agree with the idea that modifying the cookie cutter (when it makes sense) is a welcome challenge.  I'm working on a healthcare project currently, and guess what - a room in a convalescent home can indeed be the same whether it's here or 200 miles away.  What may differ, however, are materials, siting on property, how it all integrates with the existing or surrounding buildings on site, etc.

snooker-doodle-dandy
May 21, 13 7:36 pm

Manuel,

Dude your going to be ok!  Just get it done...and move on!  Looks like you have had some good experience under your belt. You will know when they are throwing the sucker punch!

Max Content
May 21, 13 8:03 pm


Shake and bake, usually reserved for a less-than-fabulous client. 


boy in a well
May 22, 13 12:03 pm

I believe you meant to say:

Secouez et faites, avez habituellement réservé cuire au four à un client moins-que-fabuleux.

Don't get lazy now. We have expectations of you.

observant
May 22, 13 12:43 pm

^

Beaucoup des clients sont moins que fabuleux. 

Quelquefois, on arrive proche a dir "va te faire foutre."

Mais on a besoin des clients, et leur argent.  Desole'.

Max Content
May 23, 13 3:09 pm

Comme "Shake and Bake" est un produit américain je pensais que l'anglais était la meilleure langue dans laquelle la parole.

Je m'excuse pour la déception. Mais pas au client.

observant
May 23, 13 3:19 pm

J'ai oublie le mot Francais pour "cookie."

"Cookie cutter" n'est pas "couper le gateau."

Max Content
May 23, 13 4:46 pm

Ce que nous appelons un biscuit, vous appelez un cookie.

observant
May 23, 13 4:56 pm

J'ai eu un gateau du mousse chocolate pour un dans "le septieme" quand a Paris.  Dans une rue tranquille et une patisserie ordinaire, sans beaucoup du monde.  Trois euros et soissante, mais une chose incroyable.

Cookie cutter design?  Only if you're doing Burger Kings or warehouses.

Max Content
May 23, 13 5:08 pm

Ou maisons de spec.

EKE
May 24, 13 10:59 am

Nature doesn't come up with a new leaf design for an oak tree with every new tree.  It uses a pattern. 

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