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LineSync Architecture

LineSync Architecture

Wilmington, VT

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The Bank Park provides a point for understanding the disparate architectural element of the historic downtown, including a view of the Crafts Inn and Memorial Hall (the only two McKim Mead & White buildings in the state).
The Bank Park provides a point for understanding the disparate architectural element of the historic downtown, including a view of the Crafts Inn and Memorial Hall (the only two McKim Mead & White buildings in the state).
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Bank Park

Situated at the crossroads of two Vermont byways in an historic downtown, the Bank Park consists of a public green, wooden arbor and scenic overlook. The park provides spaces for gathering and quiet contemplation, with a framed view of the Deerfield River through the arbor. The 50 x 25 foot park is made exclusively of materials exceeding LEED Sustainable Design standards.

 
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Status: Built
Location: Wilmington, VT, US

 
The Bank Park arbor and deck rest on the foundation of the Old Bank Building that burned down in 2003. The arbor structure gave new life to dead tree limbs found on the site. The new plants were grown at a local nursery and selected by resident Master Gardeners.
The Bank Park arbor and deck rest on the foundation of the Old Bank Building that burned down in 2003. The arbor structure gave new life to dead tree limbs found on the site. The new plants were grown at a local nursery and selected by resident Master Gardeners.
A fall view of the park from the North East corner of the intersection
A fall view of the park from the North East corner of the intersection
The curved beams were formed from Cedar boards laminated masterfully by Vermont Artisan Eric Sprenger.
The curved beams were formed from Cedar boards laminated masterfully by Vermont Artisan Eric Sprenger.
The beams were elongated to create a biomorphic profile that echoed the curved Ogee beam form. In this case, the fortuitous placement of knots in the wood suggests the profile of Vermont’s wildlife.
The beams were elongated to create a biomorphic profile that echoed the curved Ogee beam form. In this case, the fortuitous placement of knots in the wood suggests the profile of Vermont’s wildlife.
The gentle undulation of the pergola roof was scaled to slip into the eave of the classic New England architecture next door.
The gentle undulation of the pergola roof was scaled to slip into the eave of the classic New England architecture next door.

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