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Interior Design or Interior Architecture?

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tintt

I didn't read all if this but architect is a protected term. There is no such thing as an interior architect who is not an architect. You cannot skip the other parts of being architect to just focus on interiors and use that term legally. I'm sorry for the students in these interior architecture programs who are getting degrees that are not accredited. You will not be able to call yourself an interior architect. I feel a little balky, repeating myself, but this is important.

Nov 23, 16 1:58 pm  · 
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Non Sequitur

Tintt, this is exactly how I see things.

SneakyP, I have no issue with int-des calling what they do int-des. Heck... I often do int-des since it's a big part of the services my office offers. My license and M.arch give me just as much, if not more, qualifications.  What I  have issues with is the int-des using my profession as a crutch.

Nov 23, 16 2:06 pm  · 
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tintt

Xenakis, ffs, if you think designing from the inside out yields better results, then adopt it. Architects are not forced to ignore the buildings' users and their experiences. I've always designed from this point of view, it was part of my education, a huge part... humans who use buildings... Who are you designing for? The contractor? The trade magazines? 

Nov 23, 16 2:16 pm  · 
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SneakyPete

"architect is a protected term"

 

Yup. Legislated relevance. Good thing we have those title laws. 

 

What is an architect legally responsible for? 

 

What do you, as an architect, bring to the table with regards to the priorities of the client? What, if anything, does that have to do with your title? If the legal protections for the title went away and the HSW was opened up to other professionals (the ones that exist as consultants to the architect due to aforementioned legislation and a lack of interest by the architect) what would change? While y'all sit around defending the name of your castle, the deed has been bought by the "invaders".

 

This, of course, is not ALL architects. But the future of the profession does not rest on enforcement of the title laws.

Nov 23, 16 4:10 pm  · 
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Non Sequitur

Please... the vast majority of these consultants you claim who are knocking on our castle wall are grossly unqualified, especially in my area of practice.

Nov 23, 16 4:53 pm  · 
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SneakyPete

What would change for you tomorrow if there was no licensure? Same legal requirements to protect HSW, same code, same everything. What would change? How would you differentiate your practice from someone you deride as inferior? I'm in no way advocating we eliminate the title laws, I'm advocating that we stop whining about every minor infraction as if it's somehow the straw that's going to break the camel's back. The work is how we should advocate for our profession, not by going after everyone calling themselves whatever sequence of letters we feel are ours.

Nov 23, 16 5:06 pm  · 
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Non Sequitur
But they generally are inferior and from my experience, their academic and professional process reflects this very well.

Inferior designers and other building designers are not required to carry insurance in my market so plenty run wild. I have plenty of projects That needed saving because the client originally went to such a "professional".
Nov 23, 16 5:26 pm  · 
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Non Sequitur
But they generally are inferior and from my experience, their academic and professional process reflects this very well.

Inferior designers and other building designers are not required to carry insurance in my market so plenty run wild. I have plenty of projects That needed saving because the client originally went to such a "professional".
Nov 23, 16 5:26 pm  · 
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SneakyPete

So you feel justified in lumping an entire group of people together and referring to them with a dismissive slur?

Whatever works for you, dude. You do you. 

When I have a chance to work with an interiors professional, I treat them as I would any other professional adult instead of using them as an excuse to generalize and dismiss the group of which they are a part. 

Nov 23, 16 5:32 pm  · 
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tintt

I'm sorry that non-seq has had bad experiences, but most of the interior designers I know are really talented. 

Nov 24, 16 7:12 am  · 
1  · 
tintt

Several color blind architects out there who I surmise can only see in shades of toasted bagel.

Nov 24, 16 7:39 am  · 
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Non Sequitur
Tintt, I'm more than willing to admit my experience is relative the low quality grab bag of various "complementary" disciplines currently pumped out of colleges. It seems that they are taught that all are equally qualified to work as architects but are not informed on the vast knowledge gap that seperates them from M.arch grads and licensed folks.
Nov 24, 16 9:16 am  · 
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tintt

I hear you, NS, becoming an architect is a very long and grueling road but the torture for torture parts of it all just might not be necessary. This profession is obsessed with paying dues. To who? To what? Why? Good for those that get to skip all that. It shouldn't take 12 years to be an architect (5-8 years of school plus 3-7 years internship plus about a year for exams). My brother is a doctor, it only took him 10 years I think... undergrad through residency. Board certification was another test that he said had a 90% pass rate.

Nov 24, 16 10:40 am  · 
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SneakyPete

Architecture school is equally guilty of over promising and under delivering. Individuals get pumped into the pipeline without ever being exposed to the cold hard truth that for every hour of time spent as if work was studio, there are many more spent doing code research, energy calcs, consultant coordination, client education, contract negotiating, etc. While many get over the culture ahock and false promises, others either half ass it or leave altogether. 

Nov 24, 16 1:06 pm  · 
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tintt

Sneaky Pete, yup, what schools give shouldn't be called an education but rather an indoctrination, which used to be reserved for doctorate degrees. I'm lucky I enrolled in an accredited program, could have easily made that mistake myself. The only thing you can do with an unaccredited degree is go back to school and they got you in their trap.

Nov 24, 16 10:02 pm  · 
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melissathetika

Tintt, where did you do your program, and what program did you do??

Jan 24, 19 11:27 am  · 
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kristapskarnītis

As far as I know Interor Design and Interior Architecture really is semantics. Interior Designers are highly demanded these days, especially those well acquainted with 3DsMax

Dec 1, 16 6:28 am  · 
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Bench

Got a source for that? Because the market seems to be saying otherwise at the moment.

Dec 1, 16 9:47 am  · 
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archietechie

^ Maybe in asia they do. Unlike westerners who can afford landed properties, the asian property market is mostly high rise condos/projects. That way any tenant that moves in could simply hire an interior designer to spruce up the place.

Dec 1, 16 10:08 am  · 
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kristapskarnītis

Its from 2014, but still a good article
http://www.careerigniter.com/questions/are-interior-designers-in-demand/

Dec 1, 16 10:11 am  · 
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Bench

Ah yes, the mighty Career Igniter. Im sure all the click-bait ads to sign up for interior design programs have nothing to do with this outstanding piece of journalism. Definitely no sponsored content there.

Dec 1, 16 12:35 pm  · 
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KennyKenny

After graduated from Interior Architecture, can you jump straight into part 2 Architecture Course ? I am currently working atm as an Interior Designer/ Architect , I feel like I need to take my skill future and learn more. Can anybody help ?

Dec 30, 16 5:57 pm  · 
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Bench
If you're speaking about the RIBA part II (otherwise known as a professional m.arch) - no. Not with an interiors degree.

If you're speaking about an M.arch II in North America (otherwise known as a post-professional m.arch) - still no. Not with an interiors degree.

And stop calling yourself an interior designer / architect. You're the former, not the latter.
Dec 30, 16 7:18 pm  · 
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KennyKenny

Thanks for comment Bench. Does that mean people who want to be an Architect who graduated IA will have to study 7 years of architecture again? I thought interior architecture course is designed for people to have the flexibility to transfer to architecture later on ?

Dec 31, 16 11:37 am  · 
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Non Sequitur
No, you just need an accredited m.arch. Int-arch is just int-des rebranded.
Dec 31, 16 12:22 pm  · 
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Tallresa

Just coming in late, haven't read all, but I keep seeing that interior architecture is just interior designers mooching off of the revered term "architecture".

 

However, as I had interest in the field, I learned that IA is a licensed architect who specializes in interiors. Why the corn fusion and bashing here???!!

Jan 26, 17 8:34 pm  · 
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Non Sequitur

^No it's not.

Jan 26, 17 10:24 pm  · 
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Tallresa

Y'ALL- GET YOUR ARCHITECTURE DEGREE AND LICENSE. From there you have the power and the knowledge base to do what you want. Using the word "ARCHITECTURE" in your career title comes at a price, the price of accredited education and licensure. Period.

I didn't read enough to really claim my going off which I am about to do, but all of this nitpicking and circular debate sounds about as gay as a couple of amazing interior designers trying to decide on what "Pacific Blue" really means as the drapes relate to the painting of an Atlantic coastline on a "Winter White" wall.. 

No offense at all, just: It's simple. Architect means licensed architect. Interior architect means licensed architect with some specificity floating in front of the word.

Jan 27, 17 1:11 pm  · 
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nikitamhaske

So what should we go further for studying interior designing or architecture

Jun 12, 17 5:52 pm  · 
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littleboxes

+1 Tallresa.

Rant:
Buildings aren't better designed inside out, or outside in. You can't design a, "unique inspiring space," that flows, with latest low VOC "green," materials, and scrum areas--and then try to figure out setbacks, easements, solar orientation, orientation to views, grading, parking, site accessibility, city ordinances, apply for a variance or two, how to drain the roof, utility lines, (try to) stay within budget of time and money, and figure out where the hell that transformer is going. Design is holistic--everything from considering prevaling winds, to locating mechanical rooms, section details, building parti, with always putting first the life safety and welfare of the public.

To practice architecture is to conduct a symphony. We have to be educated enough to be able to converse with owners on pro-formas and contracts, coordinate the design (int and ext) with PME so that it looks and functions well, trained in proportions, good design, communicating our thoughts (via drawing, rendering, modeling, presentations), and most importantly, make sure the thing doesn't fall down on Sally's head, and make sure the disabled can navigate it well.

Go to architecture school. It will challenge you. You won't just learn about designing 50 story glass dildos, or just learn about providing unique welcoming spaces with interior partition placement. You will learn about architecture.
Say no more say no less--we are talking about architecture.

Slice and dice the words design, interior, intern, designer all you want. Just leave Architect for those that worked hard to be accepted to a NAAB school, rigorously study, understudy, study some more, get underpaid, and pass our exams.

Go to architecture school if you want to learn about architecture. Period.

Jun 17, 17 1:24 am  · 
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hebanimer

I got accepted into university of houston for interior architecture but after reading all these comments I'm thinking about changing my major and maybe getting of of the architecture field entirely. What do you think?

Jul 3, 17 8:46 am  · 
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littleboxes

Get out while you still can!! ;-)

Aug 10, 17 11:17 pm  · 
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lazy__writer

do not let the bitter, mostly biased comments get to you, do what makes you happy, and what you feel you will be happier doing. PERIOD!

Aug 13, 20 4:09 pm  · 
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dominiond

It depends on your temperament and work style:

From my observations of the commercial architecture world, if you want to spend your first 5 years working on feasibility studies, zoning analyses and then working on construction document production on parking garages and window wall systems, and a long duration (5 years) project pace, study architecture and go into base building design.

If you want to spend your first 5 years, working on "smaller" scale projects and fast (8-12 weeks) project schedules, seeing your designs be constructed in a year, being feted by sales representatives (you never have to pay for lunch or a baseball/basketball game), sponsored to travel for week long trade shows and don't mind being in a constant state of frenzy, study interior architecture/interior design. You have to be able to multi-task and juggle priorities constantly because you usually have 4-5 projects v 1 enormous project in base building.

Jul 3, 17 10:36 pm  · 
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auninja91

Not sure why there seems to be so much "bitterness" on the topic...

I do agree with the comments about pursuing an an accredidted architectural degree relating to designing a buildings exterior and interior..you can't really do one without the other.

while an architect may not need to focus on all the smaller details of the interiors, that doesn't mean they don't consider this when designing.

I posted a thread where I asked  people if they start their design process by thinking about the floor plan or elevations first...most people said they consider both.

It also depends on the program your choose to get your architecture degree from. some universities i find can have more technical syllabus over the years than others....

i know when i did my b.arch the earlier years were focused more on conceptual/exteriors, and the later years more on interior spaces and planning...

if you get a b.arch/m.arch you can always focus more on interiors if that is what interests you. having a license doesn't mean you cant work on interiors, so why not go for it...

maybe this would also relate to the size of the firm you decide to work at.

Jul 31, 17 3:21 pm  · 
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randomised

"Not sure why there seems to be so much "bitterness" on the topic..."

Welcome to Archinect!

Aug 3, 17 4:11 am  · 
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boradoğrular

"İç mimar olacağıma hiç mimar olmam" is a famous and also a hilarious saying in Turkish.

"If i am gonna be an interior architect, i would rather be no architect at all".

Btw, if your family is rich and have connections, definitely go for the Architect degree...

Aug 1, 17 9:14 pm  · 
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quynhletruc

So I have skimmed through all the comment above and have something to say about this. A bit about my background first if you don't mind. I have studied Graphic Design in Italy. And now I am in Los Angeles  working toward my Master in Interior Architecture. I have taken some classes in Santa Monica College and now in UCLA Extension + Cal Poly Pomona.

So I have certain ideas about this. And this is based on my talks with all my employers or my professors who currently working as interior designers or architects. And mind you, what I say mind only apply to USA or California to be specific.

Yes, interior design and interior architecture are one. They use the term 'interior architecture', as someone has said, is so as to detect themselves from being considered "decorator". Because interior designer (ID) do more for the interior space than decorating it (and I'm talking about all the involvements in moving nonload-bearing walls, replacing cabinets, relocating plumbing fixtures, and other mechanical elements, building code, ff&e, interior structure, etc.). But can we call ourselves interior architect? No. Because simply, we are not. 

ID, at least here in California, once work for a client/project, still needs approval from architect or engineer for construction documents before sending out for bidding. That is unless you are a certified ID, one who pass the NCIDQ exam, then you can stamp your own document but also means that you take the liability to yourself. (there are always pros and cons)

Then why don't we just all go for an architecture degree? If you want, of course. Sure, I'm from a Southeast Asian country, and like a few others, architects tend to take care of everything. But that is changing for sure. Especially in large-scale commercial projects, IDs are undeniable. In terms of residential ones, IDs roles are becoming more and more important. At least here in LA, more and more people remodelling their interior without touching the exterior to better suit their desires. Residential projects, as one of my professor told me, is more intimate as the designer tend to be more involved with the client's domestic issues. So sometimes, an architect might be too rough or too rigid to do this (I might generalise things here)

So again, there is a need for everything. Comparing interior design and architect is really lacking and unfair.

Again, what I wrote above might not be all true or enough so please feel free to add your point but in a respectful and constructive way. Best.

Mar 10, 18 12:54 pm  · 
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dm123

LET THE NUMBERS SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES: In the current market, interior architects/designers are in demand. According to the Interior Design Raising Giants 2018 Report, the total amount of salary fees for this fiscal year amounted to $527 million, the highest ever. Within the top 100 firms here are the median salaries for the interiors divisions: 

Designer: $75,000

Project Manager/Job Captains: $100,000

Principals/Partners: $150,000. 

http://www.interiordesign.net/...

Just because you studied architecture does not mean that you are good at interiors. The designers, project managers and principals of the interiors divisions at these firms have interior design backgrounds. 

I am a graduate student enrolled in a 2 1/2 year Interior Architecture masters program. Interior architecture programs offer a new approach to the study of architecture. Those who are not in-touch with the world of academia or with current trends within the building industry may not fully grasp the concept of Interior Architecture. In an interior architecture program there is a big focus on learning building structure systems, digital drafting and modeling, lighting, acoustics, and so on. However, students also study color theory, materials, space planning and other topics often associated with interior design. What I like about my program is that, while there is a heavy focus on architecture, there is also a lot of emphasis placed on design and artistic expression. 

Once an interior architect/designer has passed all of the NCIDQ exams, he or she is licensed and can sign off on construction documents. Hence the push to differentiate between Interior Designers and Interior Architects. Many people are calling themselves Interior Designers without having much knowledge about construction. And some designers focus on space planning without having much knowledge about architecture. This is why there is a need to differentiate between interior design and interior architecture. 

I was reading some of the comments above. I do not see why some people feel the need to disrespect those who work on interiors projects.  All of the major architecture firms have very large interiors devisions. The designers in those interiors divisions make just as much as the designers in the exterior architecture divisions so I'm not sure what the problem is and why the lack of respect. 

At the end of the day, I think people should just do what they love to do, and respect others. We all are part of the building industry, and we all have certain strengths and talents. Some architects and designers may even look down on contractors, because they may not have a bachelor's or master's degree, but many of the general contractors are making more money than architects/designers. So I think that regardless of the degree or trade you choose to pursue, just be respectful of everyone in the industry. 

Aug 19, 18 12:50 am  · 
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lazy__writer

Well said! all the bitterness is honestly unnecessary, at the end of the day if what you're doing makes you happy, then nothing else will matters.

Aug 13, 20 4:18 pm  · 
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spacefragments

Interior Architecture will prepare you better for Master in Architecture.  Interior Design can be extremely thematic and divorced from the operations of an Architect

Aug 19, 18 8:48 am  · 
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homme_du_jura

Just take the plunge and get an accredited professional degree in architecture. It qualifies you to sit for either the ARE or the NCIDQ exams. A four-year interior design degree simply limits you to taking the latter. There are plenty of architects who end up specializing in interior design at the firms they work at, but those interior designers who later pursued architectural design often had to go back to school first.  I work in a large office where half of the employees are interior designers, and while the freebies offered to them from their vendors are much nicer than what we architects get, so much of their time is spent working in plan or in 2d, FF&E schedules, selecting furniture and finishes, or maintaining a sizeable pinterest collection (for those involved in conceptual design). The interior design teams rely heavily on their project architect ("interior architect"?) to deliver their permit sets.

Jan 24, 19 1:45 pm  · 
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Jaetten

Interior Architecture is a subject, like Architecture and Interior Design. Both Interior Designers and Architects work with Interior Architecture. 

Interior Designers practice Interior Design

Architects practice Architecture

If an Architect removes a wall to form an open plan kitchen/living room or an Interior Designer does the same brief, does that make it Architecture, Interior Design or Interior Architecture?

Does the title of the design professional then dictate the category of the brief and associated works if the brief and associated works are the same across both professions for the project in question?

If an Architect designs an builds a house it is Architecture. What happens if the internal spaces are gutted and redesigned by an Interior Designer (lets ignore some states restrictions, not all countries restrict this role providing an engineer can sign off and provide calculations etc) does the redesigned internal space then become Design or Architecture?

How is the interior space defined? is it Architecture, Interior Architecture or Interior Design?

Aug 14, 20 6:30 am  · 
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