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Pretty Confident in revit. What next?

chlee19

What would be some recommendations for the next program i should learn? Which program knowledge would be the most hirable skill?

 

 
Feb 26, 12 10:16 am

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BrianYamagata

Adobe Creative Suite (Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign): many firms use this for presentations.

SketchUp: tons of firms are now using SketchUp for 3D modeling

Rhinoceros: some firms use this for 3D modeling

3dsMax: same as above

Of course AutoCad, but that's pretty standard.

Just to name a few.

Feb 26, 12 4:53 pm
Featured Comment
Xenakis

When you say you are confident in Revit - How thorough is your knowledge?

Do you have experience with expressions in the family editor? working experience with assemblies - How proficient are you with rendering in Revit using Revit lighting? - Are you able to create connection assemblies in Revit structure? What about creating MEP layouts for coordination? How about creating cut + Fll with schedules using Revit topographic tools? How proficient are you with creating schedules and sorting? View categories?

Other programs are Rhino, and Grasshopper and Maya - also one way to improve your value, is to learn how to program Revit API

the most hireable skill, is an absolutely thorough knowledge of Revit - the questions I am asking of you, are the questions that get thrown at me at interviews - 

Feb 26, 12 4:56 pm
LITS4FormZ

If you're feeling really confident, try Digital Project. You'll need a new mouse though...

Feb 26, 12 6:15 pm
outthere

I am learning Revit now ...and have logged probably 700+ Hours  on a project in my office ....like Zenakis said there is a TON to learn about Revit ....If you dont know what Zenakis is talking about (I know I dont) ...Then stick with Revit ..do a complicated project from start to finish setting up all your own families, parameters, schedules, legends, etc. ...Do a full set of CD's and details

Maybe get a Revit Certificate

Feb 27, 12 7:21 pm
idimi

Hello,

I am a recent graduate Arch. Tech. looking for an entry level position. All the job posts I've come across in my two months of job search are asking for a min. 2-3 years experience.

I don't even see an interest in internships. Does anyone have any suggestion how to obtain experience?

Thank you.

Jun 4, 19 10:48 pm
arch76

^^outthere called it like 7 and half years ago...see above^^

Jun 5, 19 12:29 am
AlinaF

Learn people skills. That will take you farther in your career than software knowledge. 

Jun 5, 19 10:42 am
Non Sequitur

How good has that advice been for you?

thisisnotmyname

Maybe the people skills are used to convince others in the office to do the Revit heavy lifting? I've seen this m.o. used in big offices. It works until when/if somebody calls you out on it.

AlinaF

Sounds like you people are stuck in production. You want to be an architect not a computer technician.

Non Sequitur

I've spent less than 30mins per day doing production lately... the rest of my time is spent in construction management and site review. Tomorrow will be PA stuff... I'm hoping to squeeze some free time soon for some landscape design.

randomised

Have to agree with Alina here, learning how to deal with clients and consultants, get projects or how to manage a team are much more valuable than learning how to Revit, you can always hire a Xenakis to do that for you, but who will land the commissions for a Xenakis to be working his magic?

atelier nobody

All true, but beware of becoming the guy who schmoozes his way to Associate, or even Principal, without ever actually learning how buildings work. Ayn Rand was wrong about Roark, way, way wrong about how ownership transition works, but, except for the murder (hopefully) she was dead on with the Peter Keating character.

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