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Scale and dimensions

jayhong

Hi guys I am a First year Architecture student and I am really struggling in scaling. if the scale in floorplan is meter should I use meters in furnitures too? for example 1:30 in scale and 24 inches in real size, should I convert that into meters or I just write it on my plan 24inches? 

 
Nov 5, 20 2:05 pm

If you're working in metric then any dimensions should be in metric. 

Don't switch units on or in-between drawings. 


Nov 5, 20 2:15 pm  · 
4  · 
apscoradiales

Keep the plans in metric and scale the furniture to its exact metric size then insert it as a block. You can do a furniture schedule on the side of the plan; describe it there as a feet-and-inches furniture.

1:30 is a bit of an odd scale for metric floor plans. It's more common to do it at 1:100 or 1:50. I've sometimes done individual room floor plans at 1:20 or 1:25 (for hospitals, for example).

Nov 5, 20 2:24 pm  · 
2  · 
Non Sequitur

you think 1:30 is odd? Talk to my office designers... they will show you 1:35, 1:175, 1:15, etc.... you can typically get away with most school stuff at 1:50.

 · 
midlander

i'll never forget the german intern in my office who assured us working in US units was no problem, and then set up his plans to the scale of 0.1"=1'-0"

1  · 
jayhong


this is my draft is this right? I dont know what to do. 

Nov 5, 20 2:24 pm  · 
 · 
Non Sequitur

sharpen your pencil... also, don't dimension to nonsensical things like the curve of the OS chair. figure out it's size as a square and use that as reference. (pro tip: unless it's bolted down, furniture is movable so try to focus more on clearances between the pieces rather than the width of the armrest)

1  · 
apscoradiales

Don't dimension furniture on architectural drawings, unless you're making something custom just specifically for the project. Pay more attention to clearances and spacing around it.

Drafting tip - don't have lines on top of lines on top of lines...move the dims away from other lines so that you and others can read them clearly. If you have to move them a fair distance, make sure there is a leader between the dim line and the text.

1  · 
atelier nobody

What Chad said. Also, dimensions should be in millimeters (something I only recently learned myself).

Nov 5, 20 2:25 pm  · 
1  · 
Non Sequitur

mm of GTFO... unless you're doing site plan stuff, then m are acceptable.

 · 
apscoradiales

Very true for Canada, because it uses the SI system, not the other metric system. Most of Europe and Middle East, except France where the SI system started, uses centimeters for buildings, meteres for site plans.

Also, it's not uncommon to see weird metric scales in Europe...1:75, 1:125, 1:175....for some reason it's frowned up here.

Probably because the old farts wanted something that kinda resembled and was close to the old Imperial scales.

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