Archinect
anchor

Do I need an M.Arch to get licensed to work as an architect in Canada?

STSH

Hello, I know similar questions have been asked a lot on here so I apologise for the redundancy. I've read a bunch of posts regarding this, and I've seen that most suggest that you need to have an M.Arch to get licensed in Canada. However none specified if that also applies if you already hold a 5 year bachelor in architecture degree. (Bsc. in Architecture)

I attended University in the Middle East, so even though my 5-year degree counts as a professional degree here and in Europe, and I assume the US too? because its NAAB certified (however, its actually not NAAB accredited, there's a difference).
But from what I understood the Canadian system is a little different. So if I wanted to study masters in Canada and then get licensed so I can work there, do I have to apply only for an M.Arch degree or can I apply for Msc. degrees (post-professional)?

The reason I ask this is because I wanted to do a master in Urban Design and these are offered as Msc. not as M.Arch, but I dont want that to limit my chances of licensing and work. 

would appreciate any help from anyone with better knowledge on the system and accreditation in Canada. Thank you.

 
Sep 17, 20 6:44 am
Non Sequitur

these questions have also already been answered here.  You don’t need a m.arch if you can demonstrate that your current degree meets the CACB qualification for equivalency.  If it dies, then you can start the intern process and start accumulating hours once you get a job in an office. 


But you don’t need any of these things if you just want to work. Just need a visa.  Just note than unless you pass your exams and complete the intern process, you cannot act as an architect here. 

Sep 17, 20 7:43 am  · 
1  · 
Non Sequitur

If it does.

 · 
STSH

Thank you @Non Sequitur for your quick response. Just to clarify to take this route, I'd have to get my certificate accredited by CACB first, and then be able to apply for a job right?

What worries me however is my chances as a recent graduate with only little internship experience in securing a job abroad. That's why I was considering the second route of going abroad to study since its easier to secure a student visa (and I am genuinely interested in studying a master in Urban Design).

I'm thinking out loud here but I guess even in that case it would still be safer to make sure my degree can be accredited by CACB beforehand right? so that I can continue on the internship process during/after my 2 year degree.

 · 
Non Sequitur

You don't need to have anything verified to get a job... you just need to get a work permit/visa and start applying. Having your education certified for canada is required only if you want to enter the intern architect program to eventually write your exams and get a license.  

An additional degree, specifically a non-accredited one such as Urban Design, will not help your cause tho.  As a recent grad, you need to demonstrate that you can produce reasonably decent construction details and handle day to day architecture office tasks.  If anything, you would be better off taking a college level diploma in arch tech just to get familiar with (broadly speaking) Canadian construction & codes. 

1  · 
Non Sequitur

Link for the degree equivalency application.  It's $1800 loonies with no guarantee... I hear that it's a pretty long application too and you might need to get your foreign documents translated and notarized.

 · 
Non Sequitur

pro tip: don't pay foreign tuition (about 4 times what we would pay) for a fluffy non-professional masters degree like Urban Design just so you can "get a job" here.

 · 
STSH

Thank you this really helped! And yeah that makes sense.

 · 
bowling_ball

I'll back up what NS says. It might make sense to simply start applying for the visa and jobs in Canada, though I do like the idea of taking a few college (not university!) courses to get familiar with Canadian codes and standards - that would make you stand out from the pack of other non-local job seekers.

1  · 
STSH

When you say college courses, like short certificate courses right? Are there any colleges you would recommend for that, that provide some comprehensive ones for example?

 · 
Non Sequitur

Canada is a big place and every large city will have several colleges with arch tech type diplomas. College has a low-bar entry and more hands approach. Less theory and more doing.

 · 

Block this user


Are you sure you want to block this user and hide all related comments throughout the site?

  • ×Search in: