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Protruding Window Frames

Bench
Every once in a while I'll see a big, bold, sexy window frame protruding from a wall. Typically shown in a design-oriented magazine.


Example .


Does anyone have experience in designing these? Particularly in detailing them, what is the approach? Are there specific manufacturers for this type of product, or would it require a custom build-out? And would the basic detailing intent largely consist of simply adjusting flashing to be extra-wide to accomodate, or is there fundamental connection issues that need to be addressed in water proofing that I'm not aware of?



 
Mar 23, 20 6:54 pm
Chad Miller

It's a custom build.  Check out Life of an Architect.


https://www.lifeofanarchitect.com/the-cabin-project-technical-drawings/

Mar 23, 20 7:12 pm
Bench

Excellent example, thanks CM!

citizen

Whereas a conventional approach would be 1) wall, and 2) window assembly in wall opening, the above image would be 1) wall, 2) separately designed and built frame feature, and 3) glazing assembly set within.  The nice ones I've seen have the oversize frame in black steel plate; it's thick for steel, but architecturally thin at the facade scale.  It can have a nice effect.

Mar 24, 20 1:48 am
Bench

Very good explanation citizen. That's one of the things I've been struggling to understand with these - the best ones seem to use a simple steel sheet/plate to bend around the exterior. But that appears too simple, I'm not sure how to drain it. I'd assume there needs to be some sort of thermal break in the connection back to the wall? And that the piece cannot act structurally on its own, so how does it stay supported?

archanonymous

We fastened this plate to standard precast embeds with fiberglass shims between. The window itself is super cheap Kawneer. The precast is, well, precast.


Mar 24, 20 10:42 am
Non Sequitur

perhaps dumb question... but snow? is that a thing here?

Chad Miller

How did you deal with the thermal bridging?

archanonymous

Thermal bridging - Fiberglass spacers... i guess there is a bit of bridging through the fastener itself, but not of concern in this building - it is a precast sandwich panel which don't have the greatest performance anyways.

archanonymous

Snow - the top of the frame is slightly sloped each way away from the center, so water drains to the sides and not back towards the sealant joint at the concrete.

archanonymous

Snow is definitely an issue here too.

Bench

Is it a series of plates welded together at the edges/seams? Or is it a continuous bent plate (seems unlikely...) ?

Non Sequitur

Cool, thanks. We have a few welded-plate frames currently in construction. I think the shop drawings show 3mm thick steel... which is pretty thin for our spans but hey, their p.eng signed off on it.

archanonymous

The photographs don't really capture the raw welds, but yes all four corners are welded. I like it better in person b/c you can see them. There's also little weep holes drilled in the aluminum plate at the bottom two inside corners so that it can drain wind-driven precipitation.

archanonymous

Drainage and weeps: 


Mar 24, 20 11:31 am
Chad Miller

Neat. I figured the thermal bridging was taken care of with the shims and that the top of the steel was sloped for drainage.


That or you used a lot of sealant.  ;)

archanonymous

Vigorously use

Caulk all over the building

Hoping for the best

Mar 24, 20 11:51 am
Volunteer

Google 'Oriel window construction details' for a ton of info and drawings on construction. 


Mar 24, 20 12:46 pm
citizen

Great thread!  And thanks for posting those, archanonymous.

Mar 24, 20 2:16 pm
joseffischer

We've done the same thing using Plywood with backer rod & sealant breaks, thickness of plywood varies by protrusion and overall size of "frame" Then the whole thing is painted with your liquid applied barrier.  Then you put the window where you want it, sheetrock to the window on the inside (or a wood sill or whatever) and have the window installer provide break metal around the frame matching the window. This way we don't add a new tradesman to the job.  Hope that makes sense.


Mar 24, 20 2:35 pm
archanonymous

Another up-close. Arrow to the sash weep and then the small hole drilled at the back of the frame along the weld. Also some less-than-stellar sealant work on this window. 




Mar 24, 20 2:53 pm

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