Archinect
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Grafting historic facades onto new structures

Susz

I'm trying to find more projects that have reused / grafted relics of an existing facade onto a new wall/facade/building. The Mile Museum is the closest example I have to illustrate a process like this:

Medieval Mile Museum Kilkenny Ireland / Mccullough Mulvin Architects

They've cut murals into slabs of the preexisting walls then re-displayed them in a gallery format(picture below). As for other precedents, Scarpa was my first thought, but from what I can see he typically "peels" away layers, as opposed to the Kilkenny Museum that actively cut the "relic" layer out then grafted it onto something new.... a tad cannibalistic really.

I'm curious has anyone here run into something similar or know of precedents that achieve something similar in terms of adapting historic remnants onto new construction?  I've exhausted my current supply of books and know-how...I'm honestly just looking into different possibilities of doing this feasibly. It would be interesting to find a project that attached relics like this onto a raft or something beyond the "put it on the shelf and call it a day" method shown. Any tectonic gurus out there?  

Medieval Mile Museum Kilkenny Ireland / Mccullough Mulvin Architects

@Christian Richters
 
Jun 25, 19 11:58 pm
randomised

Manuelle Gautrand - le palace theatre #1

http://www.manuelle-gautrand.c...

She later extended it and now it looks like this:

le palace theatre #2

Jun 26, 19 4:08 am
SneakyPete

She later decided to ruin it and now it looks like this:

Fixed that for you.

Jun 26, 19 11:43 am
Non Sequitur

that has to be a photoshop right? No one would paint it to match?

randomised

Agreed SneakyPete.

Here the paintjob Non:


Non Sequitur

I did not want to see that Rando...

Susz

Hmm, I should have kept tabs on her work throughout the years. Funny that you mention her work, I first learned about her years ago when she did a neat project near the Parisian Docks doing almost the exact opposite process grafting new architecture onto an existing structure. (Project image shown)


randomised

That's Jakob+MacFarlane though...

Susz

You’re right. Wow. Im just going to go sit in the children’s corner

Non Sequitur

the children's corner always has cool toys

senjohnblutarsky

The remains of the Hotel Esplanade were moved and incorporated into the Sony Center in Berlin.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hotel_Esplanade_Berlin

Jun 26, 19 11:51 am
Susz

"The Breakfast Hall was dismantled into 500 pieces and then later put back together again; this can be found today in Café Josty. " And here I'm just looking at adapting 50 pieces-wow. Color me impressed. The sectional re-staging of the cafe is nice. It's far stronger as a spatial adaptation / replication, imho. The facade doesn't do much for me personally (a glass box over the historic facade, if I found the right photos?) Thank you for sharing!

Menona

Didn't someone just mention the Kolumba Museum by Peter Zumthor as something along those lines?  Not sure if that is the category you're looking for, but....


Jun 26, 19 12:02 pm
Susz

Ooh, where was that mentioned? Thanks for the heads up!

Menona

I think it may have been on one of the threads about Notre Dame after the fire.

Susz

I saw some of these articles two weeks ago, thank you for sharing one here. Facadism seems a hotly debated topic. For better or worse it does seem like a go-to method doesn't it? I'm actually trying to achieve something closer to your post on the Tribune tower...using reclaimed pieces as parts to a new whole. I never seen the Tribune tower up close, I'll will definitely look into it. Do you know why they did that?

And the Tribune Tower, of course.


Jun 26, 19 1:33 pm
flatroof

Legacy at Millennium Park preserved some Jeweler building facades on it's backside. 


Jun 26, 19 2:07 pm
randomised

And Foster's New Hearst in NY?

Jun 27, 19 12:53 am
Non Sequitur

I've always liked that one.

senjohnblutarsky

When I was in school I thought the Caixa Forum project by Herzog & de Meuron was interesting. The older I get, I dislike it more and more.  The bottom of the building is still fascinating.  And the interiors are good.  But top treatment has lost its luster in my eyes. 

Jun 27, 19 8:05 am
midlander

why?

senjohnblutarsky

It just reads more and more like a box with a hat on it. A cool, magical, floating box with a hat on it.

midlander

that's pretty much the point i thought. it's hdm's plan B, which gets used for a lot of projects. that purple triangle thing in barcelona is far worse.

midlander

elbephilharmonie hamburg is a good way to do it if budget is no concern. it is much prettier than the old warehouse it sits on.




Jun 27, 19 8:32 am

The Museum in Gibellina Nuova by Fancesco Venezia is absolutely beautiful. He reused elements from the old Gibellina, a town that was devastated by an earthquake. The history of that place and the architectural works that took place as remembrance of the lost town are amazing.


Pictures by E. Piccardo

Jun 27, 19 3:50 pm
Susz

It's beautiful. Really nice work.Thanks!

Susz

And this too. Will look into it!

gwharton

Carlo Scarpa's Castelvecchio is still pretty much the gold standard for this sort of thing.

https://archiobjects.org/museo-castelvecchio-verona-italy-carlo-scarpa/

Jul 1, 19 12:08 pm
Susz

I touched on Scarpa in my OP, (scroll up). Thanks.

Susz

Thanks for the feedback everyone---lots of great suggestions. I have looked into each recommendation so far, even though I did not comment specifically on each post.  In the meantime, I will continue to check back if more come in. Viva la architecture.


Jul 5, 19 12:47 pm

Though is not a facade project, Guy Aulenti's Musée d'Orsay is a great example of working with an historical building. Probably some of the examples given in this thread would be good strategies to learn from repairing Notre Dame in Paris.

Jul 5, 19 1:15 pm

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