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AA or SCI ARC for Undergrad

paolobarkett

Ive been accepted at SCI ARC's Bachelor of Architecture program (1st Year) (still awaiting to know if i will receive a scholarship) and also the AA's Five-year ARB/RIBA recognised course in architecture (First Year)(still awaiting to know if i will receive a scholarship). I am leaning on SCI ARC at the moment as i have lived in London my whole life. Which one should i pick? 

 
Apr 30, 19 10:35 am
SpeculativeCollonade

Money aside, it'll come down primarily to where you want to work afterwards, what kind of work you're interested in, and what architectural ideologies you want to align yourself with.


The AA is still heavily influenced by Zaha/Schumacher through DRL and has many opportunities for computation/parametricism, etc. People I know at the AA have easily found work in many of the London heavy hitters like Grimshaw. It also helps that the AA attracts the biggest names for public lectures. The AA will place you more "in the centre of the action" in regards to what's happening at the highest level of discourse in architecture. You'll also have more flexibility to explore different ideas within architecture as the AA has wider focus across current issues in the discipline. The new director of the AA has shaken up the school in a lot of ways and whatever is happening at the AA usually affects all other schools around the world. Graduates tend to work at ZHA, Foster, Grimshaw or end up teaching at other universities. 

SCI-Arc is being heavily influenced by the 'triple-o' folks like Graham Harman and almost all of the upper faculty. This means a move away from parametricism and computation and towards formalist architecture. SCI-Arc does not have the many post-professional interdisciplinary programs that the AA has and is strictly focused on architecture alone. That being said, SCI-Arc recently has had seminars/workshops with Nike, folks from Hollywood, and is involved in many tangential projects. Many of the students end up pursuing non-architectural work afterwards in things like fashion, film, and technology. Graduates often find work at Woods Bagot, Gensler, Gehry Partners or in randoms like Tesla or Nike.

The debate of London vs. LA is obviously down to preference - however moving to a new city would be an exciting experience for you. Either way both will set you up to find work locally and internationally.  What you can do is compare the student work at the AA and SCI-Arc online and see which of two you'd like to end up having in your portfolio.


Apr 30, 19 10:58 am
paolobarkett

Thank you so much, this was very helpful

TED

I think the Zaha thing is gone - new director at AA is doing exciting things - Patrick doesn't teach much and Undergrad/dip is much different than DRL - grads from AA have no prob getting job - I think AA has more global mileage than SciArc

SpeculativeCollonade

I agree with TED, AA makes for a better undergrad as it's much less niche than SCI-Arc . Didn't know about Patrik being less involved! Good to know!

paolobarkett

What About undergrad at sci arc and then DRL at the AA?

chigurh

rich kid problems

Apr 30, 19 4:53 pm
justavisual

AA 


esp if you will need to register in the UK, the equivalency is a bitch

May 1, 19 9:59 am
paolobarkett

What About undergrad at sci arc and then DRL at the AA?

justavisual

I dont think DRL gets you RIBA part II - only the undergrad diploma school at the AA which is year 4/5. So what then 3 years at sciarc and 2 at AA with a difficult transfer in between? Or 5 at sciarc and then doing the last two over in the UK to get part 2? You need to research this and go and talk to people at the AA.

SpeculativeCollonade

I think paolobarkett means a professional 5-year B.Arch at SCI-Arc and 2 year post-professional at the AA

paolobarkett

Yes, do you think it is doable? and worth it?

SpeculativeCollonade

As justavisual pointed out, your professional degree would be American which means it will be easiest for you to gain your architecture license in the USA. You can still of course eventually get a UK license. This thread is about UK-USA licensure https://archinect.com/forum/thread/106325968/aia-and-riba

Do your professional undergrad in the country you most likely would want to work in afterwards.

paolobarkett

Even if I come back to the UK and apply for and Architecture and Urbanism (MArch) at the AA?, would i not be able to work in both countries then?

TED

You would be able to work but not formally with the title of architect - Both countries have a difficult process to become licensed - take the recommendation from @Spec: do the professional degrees either NAAB, ARB/RIBA in the country you think your will work in - If you plan long term London do AA 5 Year then travel to US for post professional degree (1-2 years) return back to UK - 


justavisual

doesnt solve his RIBA part II equivalency im pretty sure

May 2, 19 9:59 am

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