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Deciding between Texas Schools

marcelomagalhaes

So to keep it simple. I have to decide where I will attend school to finish undergrad for architecture and pursue licensing and that sort of thing. Aside form Ut austin, rice and A&M I got into Texas Tech, u of h, ut arlington and utsa. Anyone have any advice? Talked to community college adviser and she told me Texas Tech and u of H were the better options. I also got into Ohio State but the amount of debt I would have is quite high and if possible want to stay as debt free as possible. If my options are the ones considered "lesser schools" in Texas, should I risk the debt and get a degree from Ohio State? Should I focus my undergrad at one of these school and go for masters at UT Austin? I have until may to decide where I want to go and kind of nervous. Another thing, if I decide to try to move to a different state will having an undergrad from tier 2/3 schools hinder me? 

 
Mar 18, 19 10:44 am
Anon_grad2.0

UT and UH have 5 year degrees. Unless you plan to teach, I’d pick one of these two. 


Tech better than UT...lol.


I went to UT as an undergrad. It’s the best undergrad program in the state and one of the better in the country

Mar 18, 19 11:04 am
marcelomagalhaes

i'm aware ut is an excellent school I just didn't get in.

marcelomagalhaes

and eventually I would like to teach

Anon_grad2.0

“Aside form Ut austin, rice and A&M I got into Texas Tech, u of h, ut arlington and utsa“, this sentence makes it seem like you got into every school in the state.

bass assassin

Pretty easy: UT and Rice are great and both significantly better than OSU architecture.

Mar 18, 19 1:53 pm
marcelomagalhaes

I'm aware, I just didnt get in lol. osu,utsa,ut arling, uf oh and texas tech were the places i got into.

thatsthat

I went to Texas Tech - loved my experience there.  A lot of Tech grads I know (myself included) went off to different (better) schools for grad; it is very common there.  In addition to the low price tag, Tech is a great place to get a good foundation and decide where you'd like to be for a grad program.  There is probably equal emphasis on the practical (mech systems, structural, etc.,) and design theory, which prepared me well for working in an office on real projects.  One of the things I liked most is that the faculty is open to letting you explore your own interests within their classes, even to the point that through a reasonable appeal to faculty, you can trade electives for classes that fit more in your wheelhouse. 

Mar 18, 19 2:13 pm
marcelomagalhaes

sweet, thats pretty cool about trading off the electives i'll keep that in mind

homme_du_jura

I've worked alongside a number of UT Arlington and Texas Tech grads, and they have proved to be quite capable in all kinds of roles in the firm. It's pretty common for those who go to those programs to do MArch degrees at elite programs (Harvard, Yale, Columbia, Sci-Arc) if they have a knack for high design. Otherwise graduates form UT Arlington and Texas Tech have an easy time finding jobs in the growing D-FW job market. Save your money, go to one of these affordable state schools, explore what you would like to do while you are still a young undergraduate, then go big to a top graduate program if your heart so desires.

Mar 18, 19 3:58 pm
Anon_grad2.0

If you’re talking about saving money, a five year degree is the best “bang” for the buck. Tuition will be roughly the same at any Texas school, aside from Rice. The only two programs that offer a 5 year degree in Texas are UT and UH. Everyone else has a 4 year degree.

homme_du_jura

That's a good point, but a 5-year B.Arch seems like deeper commitment than the original poster was willing to take. Doing a 4+2 at UT Artlington and Texas Tech would be comparable in cost to doing a 5 year degree in Austin, especially since the cost of living in the state capitol is far higher than in Arlington or Lubbock. I went to get a masters at UT Austin, and the majority of the student loans I took went towards housing and basic necessities, despite holding a part-time job at a local firm while going to class. It's true that a 5-year U of H would be the cheapest, since Houston is cheap and job opportunities are plentiful.

marcelomagalhaes

I would like to teach in the future so I would hopefully like to get my masters at UT, if I were to stay in state. Just curious about undergrad. Thanks for the input guys/girls

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