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is it possible to get accepted to ucl with 2.2?

olapuma

hi

is it possible to get accepted to ucl with 2.2? i had tough 3rd year and kind of almost failed, but i have nice work experience and good portfolio. is there a chance that the grade is not tha main criteria while applying?

please tell me from your own experience or your friend's


thank you

 
Dec 6, 18 10:31 am
natematt
What is UCL, and what are their acceptance rates?
Dec 6, 18 11:34 am
olapuma

ucl - University College London

official basic standard is 2.2 but i would like to know if somebody actually got accepted with 2.2

Dec 6, 18 11:42 am
randomised

Tried calling them yet?

TED

You won't get into many schools with a 2.2 - your only chance is if the person you work for is x-bartlett - else, there are lots of other great schools out there -

placebeyondthesplines_

why are your grades so terrible?

Dec 6, 18 2:37 pm
Non Sequitur

maybe the grades are good and their system is based on a max GPA of 2.5.

placebeyondthesplines_

jesus that’d be a delightful twist

Non Sequitur

neither my undergrad or graduate university programs used GPAs... the first had old-school letter grades and the other used percentages.

olapuma

My grades are terrible cause my dad got cancer and was in a coma

RickB-Astoria

olapuma, without more detailed information, it is hard to give you more appropriate answers. I am not sure if the grades are as bad as think.

TED

@olapuma, perhaps you should have taken a break from your 3rd year and restart. Bartlett won't about your care your issue (sadly) - what Unii is your undergrad from? If you're really keen on going to the Bartlett look at the other non-part 2 programmes, do that first then do part 2.

RickB-Astoria

PBTS and others.... careful. This might not be GPA but something else. 2.2 which also sometimes spelled 2:2.

2.2 could mean Lower Second-Class Honours. In GPA terms, a 2:2 or 2.2 is generally a weighted (programme) GPA of 2.50 to 2.99. You may interpret that as comparable to a cumulative GPA or major GPA for the major. For what it may be worth, lets assume that's the cumulative GPA being in the 2.5 to 2.99 zone. 

UK tends to use the terms marks which is a percentile system. I am suspecting the OP is at a "Desmond" degree level. 

UK marks to U.S. letter grades.

My point is to A) Illustrate that there can be a big difference in what all these grades means. B) Slow down to think it out in context to UK system and C) follow the best advice given.

Best advice given was by randomised. 

That is CONSULT WITH THE ACADEMIC INSTITUTION. People need to actually stop asking people on this forum these questions the OP is asking. Enough of that guys. We don't run or control things like academic policy or how they interpret. What might have been acceptable or allowed in the past does not mean shit as to what is allowed today. To the original poster, olapuma, TALK TO UCL AND THE PARTICULAR DEGREE DEPARTMENT. None of our answers are going to be particularly useful. If you are a 2.2 degree (Desmond), there is a range in your cumulative marks percentile. If you are closer to a 2.1 degree level, there maybe exceptions made.

I'm assuming you are trying to get into the Architecture MArch (ARB/RIBA Part 2). They say: Normally a minimum of a second-class Bachelor's degree in Architecture from a UK university or an overseas qualification in Architecture of an equivalent standard

We can not comment on your portfolio because we don't have any of it to look at to evaluate.



Dec 6, 18 3:35 pm
placebeyondthesplines_

also bear in mind that Rick has zero educational credentials, zero professional accomplishments, lives with his parents in his 40s, and has no standing to critique anyone’s portfolio.

Dangermouse

excuse me good sir richard w.c. balkins has completed at least one community theater renovation and i will not have you besmirch his good and honest name

RickB-Astoria

First off, this isn't the 1950s where you have government programs to buy you your own house. I rather live in a house than a shitty apartment getting price gouged paying a much in one months rent as the whole damn apartment complex's annual taxes. Fuck that bullshit. As for my educational credentials, be very f---ing careful with what you are saying because your comment of zero educational credentials is saying I never attended any college which by the way I have done. As for critiquing anyone's portfolio, I never said that I would be critiquing but without a portfolio presented by the original poster, you don't have anything to critique.

placebeyondthesplines_

attending college without graduating is not a credential, dipshit. and mental gymnastics notwithstanding, you. live. with. your. parents.

RickB-Astoria

Two degrees and a certificate.... not a credential?... whatever.... However, go FUCK YOURSELF PBTS.

placebeyondthesplines_

two degrees and a certificate in architecture? nope. you have no qualifications to comment on anything related to academia in architecture. none. absolutely zero.

placebeyondthesplines_

and according to http://rickbalkins.com/ it’s actually one degree from a community college (the AAS that took you four years to complete; an actual bachelor’s degree still eludes you entirely) and a certificate.

RickB-Astoria

PBTS, everything in the education of architecture (fuck the social experiences bullshit people tout about.... as that is not what you go to college for or paying tuition for) is already written in books you can find on Amazon.com or free download PDFs and the various videos and blogs. The ONLY academic difference between an architecture education experience and that of any other damn college experience is the course work (including the studio courses). As for the AAS that was listed, it was only 3 academic years. I did take additional courses beyond the minimum required for the degree but I was enrolled at 12+ credit pace with the benefit of the Financial Aid. As for the certificate, that took longer but that also includes additional courses beyond the minimum of the degree. However, I wasn't enrolled at FTE level. From 2003 to present, the education at the Community college was not being paid by Financial Aid.

RickB-Astoria

As for the university, I was there for 3 years from around September 2011 to mid-June 2014. It included architecture courses, landscape architecture course, architectural history courses, geography courses in GIS, environmental geography, and cultural geography and some political geography. From 2014 to present, Paid off the stafford student loans. In June 2018, I completed the AAS in historic preservation which was stalled until I returned back to complete that degree. As for the architectural education that I didn't take through formal studies, I learned it by self-study and through building design practice. In any case, I know what they are teaching. It isn't like I didn't overhear the courses and instruction or seen the studio critiques / pin-up.

RickB-Astoria

Oh and PS.


placebeyondthesplines_

so you have two community college degrees and a certificate, none of which includes architectural design. anyone who has actually had proper architectural training will tell you that self-study is not an effective approach to learning design. it requires an iterative process of critical feedback (of your work, not overhearing others) from designers with far greater experience and knowledge, as well as from peers in studio. and before you trot out the list of highly accomplished architects without formal architectural training, consider whether you are highly accomplished in literally anything. you are not.

RickB-Astoria

PBTS, you say that and yet you can't produce better architecture than Frank Lloyd Wright who by the way never went to architecture school let alone had any architectural studio courses because he was in an engineering program and he only was in it for maybe 1 year. Yet, you haven't produced designs better than his very first design. Now then there was John Yeon. His first project he designed was the Watzek House. It is nice to have a client willing to pay and command such a project and willing to have an uncredentialed young designer with no background design the project. He was in Stanford University for only ONE semester. No matter what school you go to, it is impossible to teach you everything in that time frame. They can go over the fundamental principles of design and you have a book but that was all Mr. John Yeon had of architecture school. It's basically intro to architecture, some general education, and maybe art basic design principles. Don't confuse acting and playing dumb or what not that is done to get you to speak (in this case write) and expose your secret society not so secrete secrets. I'm a lot more like John Yeon than you may realize. Unfortunately, I live in different times. While he may have worked for A.E. Doyle, he was just an "office boy" for the firm. He wasn't design staff. He eventually got the break through opportunity of a life time in designing the house for Aubrey Watzek which he had done a phenomenal job. What have you designed as an architect or whatever that YOU did not you were just a minor small part. I mean you did the design and is YOUR work. What design work have YOU done that even compares? You say, you have to have all this studio feedback in order to learn how to design. That maybe for you. If I had someone like Aubrey Watzek to ask me to design him or her a house and willing to pay and that money isn't really a pressure. Of course, you need to justify good design decisions and respect the client's financial resources but again they have money and is willing to pay the money. A person like Aubrey Watzek wasn't someone with no money or very limited financial resources. I can't possibly approach a design solution for a modest paid school teacher like I may a tycoon. My clients tend to be people of a modest income level. Sure, I could design YOU a house but it would likely be more modest than the Watzek house in terms of size and scale.

RickB-Astoria

When I started going into building design, it was a few years before the biggest recession since the Great Depression. As for financial success, you need a good economy and clients willing to use your services. FYI: I am working on an exit plan from this field in the conventional sense and leave it as more a hobby than making money from it. There are far more financially rewarding opportunities.

placebeyondthesplines_

see above where I said "before you trot out the list of highly accomplished architects without formal architectural training, consider whether you are highly accomplished in literally anything"

RickB-Astoria

I seen the current star architects works and a lot of it is just flat out FUGLY ASS SHIT. Plain and simple as that. Accomplishments don't equal perpetual financial success. Some projects I have done or been a part of does account to something but maybe you are grading success solely on money. When a project serves and meets clients needs, that is accomplishment that I care a FUCK A LOT more than a project being on a glossy rag that you can wipe your ass with. As far as I can tell, you never designed any project and is just here being a troll. Since you can't stand behind your own real name for accomplishments of any kind, you are less than nothing. In the end, none of the architecture we design will be around in 10 billion years. The sun would have scorched the architecture into utter oblivion since humans won't be around to save jack shit. While there is a thin chance that in 11,000 to 20,000 years, buildings I may design could theoretically be around and survive the glaciation cycle if past glaciation periods can be evaluated from but I don't expect that. So in terms of accomplishment, its only so temporary that it doesn't matter in the grand scheme of the solar system, the galaxy, and the universe. So, who really gives a shit that far along.

TED

@Rick comments are good - if @olapuma's marks including his final project mark are wiggling around a 2:1 might be able to highlight that in an application. In the UK every Uni has its own rules on degree classification algorithm. For the purposes of calculating the Bartlett final BSc degree classification marks from years, 1,2 and 3 are weighted in the ratio 1:3:5, with marks from the two lowest 0.5 course units in the first year, and the lowest 0.5 course unit in the second year discarded. No modules from the final year are discounted. Other Unis may weight all years and modules equally. ]

RickB-Astoria

Thanks for further clarifying aspects of what I said. Anyway, I've had enough arguing with PBTS as he is just not worth it to raising blood pressure.

placebeyondthesplines_

agreed, your time would be better spent attempting to finish a bachelor’s degree

RickB-Astoria

Automated Response System: Sorry, your message can not be received because you are a douchebag.

peijunfei

Come one they are British, show your dollars and they will welcome you.

Dec 6, 18 4:39 pm
SneakyPete

PBTS and others.... careful. This might not be GPA but something else. 2.2 which also sometimes spelled 2:2.

Genesis 2:2 And on the seventh day God ended his work which he had made; and he rested on the seventh day from all his work which he had made.

Dec 6, 18 8:13 pm
RickB-Astoria

2.2 that olapuma is referring to might not pertain to the GPA as you are familiar with in the U.S. That was what I was referring to. Try to not be so American university system kind of myopic viewpoint. The only responsible answer given at this point in time is for olapuma to contact University College London. As for the portfolio, there is nothing to suggest a response to without a portfolio being provided.

natematt
I’ll ask the same critical question again... what is their acceptance rate. Even in general.
Dec 6, 18 11:30 pm
randomised

Tried calling them yet?

Non Sequitur

I believe that in general, their acceptance rate varies between 1 and 17 million.

TED

Thank God that the UK generally doesn't use/brag about acceptance rates for admissions unless your Oxbridge - at the undergrad level, Unis do look at social/economic backgrounds knowing there is lots of work to do across society. 

 A great portfolio gets you a long way but for most universities, the admissions administration team does the first vet so if you require a 2:1 to get in, unlikely your app will get forwarded to the academics who decide who to take forward for review/interview unless you meet the min entry standard. Bartlett and Russel Group Universities, in general, have much more competitive entry. There are generally no scholarships for Part 1/Part 2 students across the UK (a few). 

RickB-Astoria

TED, I'll begin by thanking you for the info. Earlier, I was trying to be clear to some other forum members that olapuma's reference to 2.2 is not likely not GPA (grade point average) as typically understood in the U.S. in the 0.0 to 4.0 range. 

What I read in the University College London's Bartlett School of Architecture's Architecture MArch (ARB/RIBA Part 2): 

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/architecture/programmes/postgraduate/march-architecture  

They do have more than one architecture degree program.

Entry Requirements 

Normally a minimum of a second-class Bachelor's degree in Architecture from a UK university or an overseas qualification in Architecture of an equivalent standard. Corporate membership of the UK professional institutions Architects Registration Board (ARB) or the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) would also meet the requirement.

All Architecture candidates are asked to present a portfolio of design work. Candidates will be contacted regarding their design work once their application has been received.

They do have further "full entry requirements for the programme spelled out.

To make sure the link works: 

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospect...

Students not from the UK would have to look at the part regarding International students and select their country.



RickB-Astoria

That program indicates that is normally requires: a second-class Bachelor's degree in Architecture (or approved equivalent).

natematt

@randomized

Why would I call them? I don't actually care. I'm asking the OP to answer because It's a critical component to answer their question. If the school is selective, the answer is no, 2.2 won't get you there. If they accept 95% of the applicants, then yes 2.2 probably will get you in, because all they really care is if you can pay. 



RickB-Astoria

natematt, he did mentioned that UCL does technically accept a 2.2 degree but it is less competitive. While the policy will technically allow it and therefore he/she may pass through the first vetting step if he/she happens to have a spectacular portfolio and if he/she is barely below 2.1 level then it might not be a total loss. If he/she is on a lower end of the 2.2 level with only a so so portfolio, he/she would be at a really really difficult time getting in. While the policy says he or she could be accepted but in practice it's a slim chance due to competitive environment because the school like all architecture schools have some limit on how many students they can accept into the program because of class sizes and a finite number of teachers to teach students. I'm not going to elaborate on the why because you're an intelligent fellow. What we don't know is exactly where olapuma falls grade wise. If he/she is on the higher end of the 2.2 degree level (like being just below what he or she needed to be a 2.1 degree) and has a spectacular portfolio then he or she may still get in.

natematt

Rick.

RickB-Astoria

natematt.

RickB-Astoria

I'll just say, make a great portfolio to submit with application, a great personal letter (if required) and give it a shot. Be prepared to apply to other programs or do something to improve the grades. I don't know if retaking the courses he or she did poorly in and do better will have any effect of upgrading his or her degree to 2.1. I don't know if it is an option in the UK. In the U.S., retaking courses could help.

natematt

Tried to edit that and it didn't work. I was just going to say, that my point is... big woop about the "requirements."

Not having a competitive GPA for a school that has a high acceptance rate is not that big of a deal. Yes, other factors matter in getting accepted beyond GPA, but if you have bad credentials, the acceptance rates are a critical factor. 

If the OP has done research on the schools to which they are applying, they should have a sense of the acceptance rates, it's not a hard question, but it's a critical factor. 

RickB-Astoria

You got a point but I am not sure that they (UCL) publishes some established acceptance rates but may have some total number of students they can accept vs. a fixed acceptance rate percentile. I have not noticed anything regarding acceptance rate on the site. So it can be a floating magical number so to speak.

natematt

A lot of schools do not post exact numbers. It's usually not based on desired percentages. It's usually a question of how many people they can accommodate operationally and how many applications they get. If you can't find a number, you can get a good sense looking at people talking about getting in vs getting rejected, overall school acceptance rates (a lot of time universities as a whole will post but not the architecture school) and by looking at the skill level of other people you know have gotten accepted. You have to actually infer the information, it's not just sitting around for you to google. However, a sense of if they are high, med, or low, is about as detailed as you really need. In the OPs case, if the school has a high acceptance rate they have a good chance.

RickB-Astoria

Often we only hear people asking questions before they apply and people whining because they don't get in. Then you have the regulars who complain and repeat their whining about not getting in in subsequent years even when they didn't apply those subsequent years. You have to statistically deduct them on those subsequent years or they distort the figures. Yet, you need to have an idea of the total number of applicants.

I don't expect people to include me in statistical figures for these peoples just because I'm not enrolled in an architecture degree program. I haven't bothered applying since say.... 2012. I may whine but that's not meant to be used to distort figures. Calculating based on this forum's posting or even other forums included is questionable at best.

natematt

If pretty much everyone gets accepted to a school, then the distortion you are concerned about is not that critical, because almost no one is going to complain about not getting in, and those that do probably don't care that much because they probably weren't trying very hard... There are other ways to make assumptions than this particular website. Like someone else said, call them, get a ballpark. If you can make a conclusion that they are even remotely selective, or not, then that is good enough for this instance. OP should already have a sense of this if they are planning to apply there.

RickB-Astoria

I don't think it will be as if everyone gets accepted to a school. What I don't know about are the detailed facts of olapuma's grades. For example: In U.S., if a person had a 2.98 GPA, it is still possible to admitted into the institution that typically has a cut off GPA of 3.0. It would be a slim chance but they can make exceptions or if there is other merits as well as other factors like lower than usual submission and they happen to have an available spot. It would be a slim chance but still a chance that olapuma can still give it a try and submit an application while also looking for other programs as you suggested. A 2.98 GPA would still be a Lower Second Class degree in UK if I read it correctly but that is besides the point. If they borderline a upper second class bachelors degree (2.1) by just a small fraction, it is still possible to get in. If they are in the middle or below (such as closer to a third class degree) then I would say the person should definitely seek other programs and raise themselves up to a upper second class degree level. It really depends on where olapuma sits. What does the transcript put olapuma at exactly. The bad third year may be concerning that can be alarming.

RickB-Astoria

The setup resembles a lot like a 4+2 combination program in U.S. but it's different. If the person doesn't have a Part 1 degree then they may need to enroll in: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett...

For that program's entry requirement: 

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospecti...

It seems like olapuma was in a Part 1 architecture degree program. If he/she had completed the degree and was rewarded the degree for the Part 1 program, then he/she needs not worry too much about Part 1 and move on to Part 2. I don't know if he/she got Part 1 at UCL or another school and wants to do Part 2 at UCL which I think he/she would be fine but nonetheless should consult UCL for further advice.


Dec 10, 18 2:51 am
TED

@Rick - thanks. Big difference, in the UK, you cannot enter a Part 2 programme without an Undergrad Arch degree (perhaps interior Arch Degree but that's the limit). Some programmes that have an integrated Part 1/Part 2 programme such as AA require a UK Part 1 award before starting Part 2 or else enter year 3. This is in part RIBA Criteria are achieved across the 5 years. Final Part 3 is generally 1 year part-time and focuses on practice and management - through practical experience and case studies.

RickB-Astoria

TED, true but you can't enter into a 2 Year M.Arch (NAAB accredited professional masters of Architecture) degree in the U.S. without first attaining the 4 year bachelors degree in architecture (we sometimes call it pre-professional to differentiate with a 5 year B.Arch). I agree with what you said nonetheless about the UK. 

As for olapuma, I would still recommend he/she talk to UCL about specifics regarding his degree standing and chances of entrance. I can only point to official or general policy as published publicly. As for specifics, that is something we really can't suggest or know the answer to. As for his/her portfolio as he/she referred to it in the original post, no one can evaluate a portfolio without presenting it. 

As for the question about whether he or she can enter into the UCL programme with a 2.2 degree, there is nothing that I had noticed that says he or she can't but at a disadvantage to those with a 2.1 degree. In my opinion, it would come down to whether he or she is on the higher end or lower end of the 2.2 degree and if his or her portfolio is spectacular or something like that compared to being say.... so so.

TED

FYI my first degree is a US 5-yr BArch so know both systems well. A 2:2 is equal to a "C" average 50% to 59% - 82% of 2018 Bartlett BS Hon Part 1 grads received a 1st or 2:1 most of whom wish to come back for Part 2. Bartlett is No. 4 of 50 UK schools across multiple league tables and is the top London School hands down. @olapuma should look elsewhere - there a many great schools out there but should be realistic - those marks would not get you into any Ivy league school, and UCL is at that level.

RickB-Astoria

He's in the orange category. The question is, is he closer to the red or the green. If he's border-lines the red then he might be able to get admitted. Remember, 16% of the students are 2.2 (Lower 2nd class degree - an honours degree category). If he is not in the honors category.... he's probably screwed.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


Threesleeve

Sheesh.  55 posts of people arguing about their speculations on academic policies that they're looking up on wikipedia. 

Did anybody bother to read the original poster's posts before starting all that? 

He already knows the official policy of the academic institution.  He's simply looking for any first-hand or second-hand anecdotes of people on the low end of the institution's stated acceptable range actually being accepted there.

Dec 10, 18 5:06 pm
TED

I've answered his 4 times. I have done UK admissions and have attended the Bartlett. So will repeat. You will not get in the Bartlett with a 2:2. Try another Uni.

chm@

@TED to my surprise, I heard that Cardiff takes in students with a 2:2 as long as they have above 55% studio grades. Do you know why that is and if Cardiff is still regarded as a good school?

RickB-Astoria

TED, you attended the Bartlett when? Is it up to date with how the current administration staff does things. If it was like 30 years ago, you're experience might be dated and even obsolete. That is why I am not too holding to your personal experience. Personal experience within 5 years would be appropriate but anything older than that potentially has to be taken with a grain of salt in that they maybe obsolete.

TED

We're still talking about this? 

No it wasn't 'like 30 years ago,' thank-you it was within 5. I have done admissions at 3 Unis (not Bartlett) and taught the students that I admitted -

@chm on Cardiff website specifically says that will consider 2.2 as long as you have a 2.1 in design studios - in UK, a 2.1 is 60-69%, not 55%. 

 For all of you who feel you need to comment and have no experience in the UK - most students around the country head to London for their year out prior to applying to Part 2, love London then wish to attend a London school for Part 2. A Postgraduate programme does want diversity of student backgrounds within a cohort. 

 That does 2 things: give Bartlett a pool of the top candidates from around the country to choose from so very selective and 2nd, opens up the door for students who for whatever reason didn't achieve top grades in Part 1 an opportunity to attend a great school outside London. Explore the schools and programmes, visit the schools and cities. Look at the work on the websites, look at the teaching staff -

If your still set on Bartlett or any top school, do something above + beyond your undergrad performance such as design comps or work abroad for a year - marks alone does not make a student but in a competitive environment you want all students to flourish so demonstrate your passion by your actions not by splitting hairs on your degree award.

chm@

@ TED my mistake, thanks for clarifying. Do you know how much the work that one does in their year out matter as much as for MArch admissions as former school portfolio and degree classification? I have a 1:1 for my Part I but the work I have been doing during so far in year out is very dry. Not applying to UCL, but Cardiff and Bath.

TED

Congrats @chm If you have a 1st you should not have a problem in either Uni. Lots of year out students complain about their experience. Work of good practices can sometimes is dry. Take advantage of your year away from Uni by pushing your design passion outside the dry stuff through sketching, photography, travel or writing - so when you enter part 2 you can push those experience into your work. Do both Bath and Cardiff have the 1st year of the MArch in practice? When interviewing students, I was always keen to hear from the student why they choose the Uni/programme and what they wished to achieve. Bath is more technical and Cardiff strength is in environmental. Both great choices.

Your individuality should come through your portfolio - who you are. Think of your past experience as a narrative - ask yourself how with this next part of your journey through the part 2 will help get you where you want to be.

RickB-Astoria

TED, okay. I asked because there is a history of people on this forum who spoke from obsolete experiences and to clarify if your experience is contemporaneous enough. Now, you given a pie chart that shows 16% of the students are Lower Second Class degree. That's what a 2.2 (or 2:2) degree is called.

TED

Yes @Rick the chart is specific to the Bartlett(UCL) - from the Unistats website entry standards, feedback, degree awards are shown. Most Unis awards 50-65%% 'Good Awards" (1st / 2:1.) Bartlett's 82% is high - https://unistats.ac.uk/subjects/study/10007784FT-UBSARCSING05/ReturnTo/Search Unistats is mostly BA/BS but there are a few MArch where the programme is linked directly to the Undergrad as a 5 year programme.

A 2:1 is an Upper 2nd Class degree. 

RickB-Astoria

Ok. As I said earlier, 16% means there is still a chance for olapuma to get enrolled at Bartlett(UCL) especially if he's a (higher end of the 2:2). Most likely, those 16% are students that A) a barely below 2:1, B) had a really good portfolio, C) good personal letter, D) other merits that demonstrates they are worthy of acceptance within the high competitive environment. We don't know what olapuma has regarding portfolio and other merits. We don't know because he/she hasn't shared that online. Unless you saw his/her portfolio because he/she sent that to you in PM, then you maybe lucky to have that information. Olapuma can certainly give it a shot to see if he or she would be a lucky one of the ~16% of the students. I do agree that he or she should also send applications out to other programs or do something to raise himself or herself to 2.1 level.

RickB-Astoria

If olapuma was in the green sliver (the 2%), he or she would have to have to have an other worldly level of phenomenal quality portfolio, merits, etc. despite a low academic grade. His or Her performance in architectural work would have to be a gold medalist quality.

olapuma

Thank you guys, i didnt expect so much constructive words, once i finish my portfolio i might publish it for some constructive comments.


I also wanted to know if there is anybody who achieved unachievable and got in with 2:2

It is actually like 2:2 not 2.2 SORRY!

Dec 17, 18 5:42 am
olapuma

Just to add; I have taken two years out and worked at Renzo Piano and Dominique Perrault to improve my skills, add some great projects to my portfolio and learn other culture etc

Dec 17, 18 6:01 am

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