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What is the most realistic rendering program, that work with Revit?

FelipeCODX

I would like to know which is, in your opnion, the most realistic rendering program, that work with Revit.

 

I don't want to create a new model just for rendering :/

 


 

 
Mar 5, 16 11:59 am
AD89

3dsmax.. you can link your revit model or import it to 3dsmax

Mar 6, 16 1:00 am  · 
1  · 
xx__

 Depends on how much time you want to invest to it.

Mar 6, 16 1:35 am  · 
1  · 
legopiece

One word Shanghai, send it there, now you can get back to your desk and be an architect. 

Mar 6, 16 10:36 am  · 
1  ·  1
SneakyPete
LoftManor

Lumion is just amazing

Mar 18, 16 1:34 pm  · 
1  ·  1
azraa eltayeb

Would you, please recommend me free tutorial or courses for learning Lumion. Thank you in advance.

 · 

Try Maxwell Render

Mar 19, 16 7:09 pm  · 
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robhaw

For preliminary visualisations I like to use Enscape. It is real time, largely automated but requires a solid understanding of Revit materials, in order to achieve high-quality results. 

Lumion can be also used for early visualisations and walkthroughs in particular, however I was never happy with the visual quality of materials in the renders.

3Ds Max+ Vray is also an industry standard tool for visualisers.

Sep 17, 20 4:47 am  · 
2  · 
SneakyPete

I find the time spent to make Enscape look really good is still less than the time spent fiddling with Max and VRay, and the clients I have met don't appreciate the difference anyways, as long as it's competent .

2  · 
robhaw

That's my experience too and Revit materials are very user friendly. I mentioned nevertheless that 3Ds Max is the industry standard as many practices now have in-house dedicated visualisers who work with this tool.

1  · 
Jay1122

Enscape, lumion, etc is good enough for non professional visualisers like architects for some in house visualization. The only realistic high quality rendering in architecture is Vray/Corona with 3DS max before you tread into animation and visual graphic software territory. Having done those realistic high quality renderings, i know that the effort is too much for average architects.I did not bother to dive deeper. It is a career of its own. No Revit model will render nice if you bring it straight over. Remember, your mullions should not be sharp 90 degree edges. It should have chamfered edges. Same goes to all the furnitures, etc. Materials are not single texture maps. I don't even want to get into multi layer materials and texture randomizers, etc. Although skill is a requirement, but the true effort is in time. Big library with existing assets is the key to cut down the time. That is why visualization firms can do what they do besides purely skill.

 · 
Jaetten

Vray, think there is a revit version. It’s brilliant on 3DS Max and SketchUp

Sep 17, 20 10:15 am  · 
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randomised

Can Vray handle axonometric/isometric projections already? Remember from uni that was impossible, had to use Artlantis for that (not with Revit obviously)...

 · 
natematt

Construction

;)

Sep 17, 20 3:17 pm  · 
2  · 
athensarch

+1 for Enscape. We’ve used it for VR presentations to clients and a perennial Architect Top 50 firm. They were pretty happy. It’s a hellova lot faster than setting up Maxwell renders I did for my previous firm.


It’s not going to look like a DBox render, but for walkthroughs it’s pretty great.

Sep 17, 20 8:34 pm  · 
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