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counselor/GRE tutor trying to have a safe deal

Jan 14 '14 8 Last Comment
kadam-patil
Jan 14, 14 10:55 am

india/m/ 22

applying for M.Arch -1.(research interest in design computation )

bachelors in civil engineering-3.38/4.00(wes gpa calculation)(college is ranked in top 20 in the country )

gre- verbal-147/quants-154/awa-3.

my counselor said no to apply to,MIT ,Havard GSD, Princeton.

he said u will not get in any of the ives(he was confident enough ) -u must score atleast 330+.

is it possible that my portfolio will not be reviewed at all due to my low scores in GRE.are these scores so low that they will throw my portfolio in the dustbin .i think i have an average portfolio .

thanking you everyone

 

Volunteer
Jan 14, 14 11:56 am

What is the cost of applying? Essentially zip, if you really want to go. In any event you will be able to get in any number of good schools and not have to carry around the Ivy League 'tude or indebtedness the rest of your life.

kadam-patil
Jan 14, 14 12:20 pm

thanks for the comment Volunteer actually i  am not carried away with the ivy tag.but is  interested in the research going along at these institutes.

Volunteer
Jan 14, 14 12:30 pm

Seems like civil engineering research into structures would be more germane? I would look at getting your PE in civil engineering while working in the field before more academic work of any kind. You can always keep up with the literature on your own in the interim.

24arches
Jan 14, 14 8:45 pm

Your verbal is under the minimum cutoff number for some schools. Minimum is hovering around 151 for Princeton and GSAPP. If your portfolio is lacking or typical, they might not be so inclined to waive off those slightly lower scores. 310+ is probably fine for a score (about average nationwide) and 330+ (165+/165+) is just ridiculous and useless to devote so much time on one small part of the application.

I feel you probably aimed too high without the proper preparation or body of work to back yourself up. If nothing happens this time around, take it as a lesson for self-improvement and try again next year.

kadam-patil
Jan 14, 14 9:54 pm
natematt
Jan 15, 14 2:05 am

I would not limit my applications to those schools obviously, but if those are ones you would really like to attend you should pick a couple and try anyway.

Most arch schools care very little about your GRE scores unless they are very bad, which yours are not. Unless the school gives a "minimum" score I wouldn't worry about it. I don't think 24arches comment about "If your portfolio is lacking or typical, they might not be so inclined to waive off those slightly lower scores" is an accurate assessment though. If your portfolio and other materials are lacking you have a more obvious reason why they wont accept you... is that fair 24?

I'd say if you can write a killer statement of purpose you should go for it. I don't really know how to meaningfully asses your portfolio given your non-arch background. Maybe someone else has some feedback on that.

Good luck.

24arches
Jan 15, 14 4:44 am

He originally asked about the GRE score range and being told not to apply. That statement of mine was leaning towards the idea that if he had an above-average portfolio then scores slightly lower than 330 or below-avg scores will not hurt as much and mostly ignored in the process. Not sure how a self-proclaimed average portfolio will help scores that seem to be below minimum for some schools listed. we're likely agreeing with each other but on different tangents currently.

kadam-patil
Jan 15, 14 6:23 am

thanks natematt and 24 arches i  perfectly agree with your point of views, but if i consider my portfolio as average or may be above average its not going to make any difference .it is dependent on the work of other applicants  i am competing with  and on  the overall standards set by  the school .so by having a conservative approach i consider my portfolio as average.

i think i will have to start a new tread for the portfolio review.

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