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University of Cincinnati or Iowa State University for undergrad architecture - need advice

Apr 27 '13 9 Last Comment
malinis
Apr 27, 13 2:29 am

Hi there

Need your urgent advise whether I should decide on 

Barch at Iowa State University or Bsc at University of Cincinnati. I've got scholarships at both universities and need to decide urgently. Am very confused. I am leaning towards Iowa State as it has an NAAB accredited degree but the co-ops at UC are very appealing to.

Please could you share your thoughts with us

Thanks 

 

MBReilly
Apr 27, 13 9:38 pm

Malinis,

Your post above seems to indicate that you believe UC's program is not NAAB accredited. The NAAB has continuously accredited the University of Cincinnati’s professional degree in architecture since 1948. Since you already know about the co-op program, I might just suggest this link about UC's undergraduate in architecture: https://webapps.uc.edu/DegreePrograms/Program.aspx?ProgramQuickFactsID=726&ProgramOutlineID=115

Full disclosure: I work at UC.

Best of luck in your decision. I'm sure you'll be successful wherever you opt to pursue your education.

Josh MingsJosh Mings
Apr 27, 13 11:14 pm

I think it was a reference to ISU's 5 year program versus the 4+2 at UC. As far as clearing up any confusion, I don't really have much to say. I did go to UC for a year right out of high school, but I was not ready for it. A couple of associates in my firm went to school there. One of the professors I learned the most from when I was at Tulane now teaches at ISU.

Look at the curriculums and see what you are most into. Co-ops are always good, but all schools have an internship requirement. You wouldn't be missing out by choosing one or the other (although it seems like having the co-op program allows UC students to get into some pretty great firms while in school).  

malinis
Apr 28, 13 2:09 am

Yes you are right, I was referring to the Bsc in Architecture at Ucin vis a vis the 5 year Barch from Iowa. 

Does Iowa have an internship program where she can work for a while?

there is no there
Apr 28, 13 10:05 am

I don't believe ISU has an internship program, no.

jk3hl
Apr 28, 13 1:02 pm

UC has a better reputation

LITS4FormZ
Apr 28, 13 1:05 pm

UC, no contest

malinis
Apr 28, 13 1:55 pm

Uc has a better reputation but what bothers me is the pre professional Bsc and not a Barch degree. She has good scholarships from both ISU and UCin. If Ucin offered the Barch the choice would have been so easy. As a parent just want to make the best decision for my child

LITS4FormZ
Apr 28, 13 2:45 pm

It's impossible to know if architecture will "work out." That's just the reality of the profession. The 5 year degree tends to lock you in, much like pursuing a masters after a BSArch.

The BSArch allows her to determine if licensure is really worth pursuing as well as the opportunity to attend a grad school with a different approach to architecture.

DAAP will also give her exposure to other design disciplines...industrial design, interior design, art, planning, digital/graphic design.

jenC
Apr 29, 13 7:28 pm

Just to clarify, the BS Arch at UC is 4 years, the M Arch is now 3 years (though of course you could always choose to go to another graduate program ranging from 2 to 3.5+ years based on your interest).  I graduated from UC's BS Arch program and continued onto the M Arch at UC, and I've gotten a lot out of the program and my co-ops.

I applied to both 4- and 5-year undergraduate programs and chose a 4-year because it had more freedom for minors or double majors.  Not everyone feels this way, but one of my coworkers with a 5-year degree wishes she would've pursued a 4+ program because while the distinction isn't important when looking for a job as an architect, she's interested in teaching, and she feels like she's at a disadvantage without having at least a first graduate degree.

DAAP is definitely a strong program, and the money she makes on co-ops can help defray some of the costs of school.  The professional connections you make are invaluable, too, and help when seeking employment after graduation.  Unlike some schools which have optional internships, co-ops are required at UC and are built into the curriculum.  There's an entire professional practice department devoted to helping students get co-ops every semester, and I don't know of anyone in recent semesters who hasn't been placed.  There are also opportunities every year to apply for many school-sponsored scholarships if money is a concern, though don't let that make or break your decision.

I'm happy to answer any other questions about UC's program you may have - best of luck with the decision!

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