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Exterior vertical concrete fins

Dec 29 '12 6 Last Comment
mm_albaiti
Dec 29, 12 9:48 am

Good day all,

http://viewpictures.co.uk/ImageThumbs/JMP-SWC-0031/3/JMP-SWC-0031_Swiss_Cottage_Library_detail_of_exterior_concrete_fins.jpg

http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6044/6323103722_4072fde29c_o.jpg

I've been searching around on the internet about exterior vertical conrete fins (something like in the pictures posted above) with little success. My queries mainly centre around the following 2 questions below:

1) What is the correct technical/architecture term used to describe this type design in a building?

2) How does one go about constructing such a design in say a 4 storey building using concrete? By that I mean i'd like to know the whole process. Is there anywhere I can download or purchase a book such as this one: http://brick.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/DESIGN%20OF%20BRICK%20FIN%20WALLS%20IN%20TALL%20SINGLE-STOREY%20BUILDINGS%200690.pdf

Or basically just anywhere I can get some further reading or videos on this topic.

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

 

Rusty!
Dec 29, 12 1:32 pm

It's just 'architectural precast'. It's shop cast and probably mechanically anchored back to whatever the substrate may be.  

The brick book you link to is from 1980. A lot of the information shown in there would be considered outdated by modern requirements for thermal and moisture protection.

Your precast fins example is also very 80's. hmm are you actually from the 1980's? Do you see a Commodore 64 in front of you?

mm_albaiti
Dec 29, 12 3:07 pm

Haha harsh lol.

Well thanks for the response, but could you explain it in more layman terms please. what do you mean by the terms "shop cast", "mechanically anchored back" and "substrate"?

I would just like some more links to resources I can read, or videos I can watch, ofcourse from a modern angle. How would you go about advising someone in 2012 wishing to obtain such a design? What is the process, the machinery, materials required and would concrete necessarily be the best option, or can the look be obtained in a different way.

Please bear with me, as admittedly I have absolutely no idea where to begin in such a topic. Thanks.

accesskb
Dec 29, 12 3:43 pm

the fun part of architecture is designing it yourself.. thinking of ways that fin would be constructed and attached to the building.

mdler
Dec 29, 12 9:28 pm

you are going to act as a consultant on something you know nothing about and are turning to Archinect for advice???

Rusty!
Dec 29, 12 10:56 pm

You are asking how to land a plane after learning how to ride a bicycle. Step back for a second. Do you know how a wood frame building comes together? Do you know how cladding is attached to it? Now we move on to steel and concrete structures. How does a curtainwall attach to it? How about stone, or masonry, or metal panels, etc... Once these concepts become comfortable you will understand the precast fins are just a variation on regular precast panels. Detailing is still tricky and important. It takes years of training to be able to sketch out such detail in 30 seconds. Unfortunately there are no shortcuts. 

t a m m u z
Dec 30, 12 12:22 am

you can call these vertical brise soleil (sun breakers)

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