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teaching career

maysixth

Hey guys,

I've done Barch + Msc in architecture. been working for a few years and I don't see myself working as an architect. That being said, I want to go into teaching, but how exactly do you go in that path? 

Is only way is to do phd? I don't want to spend another penny on studies either, and hope to get paid as a tutoring position if I do. (If it is possible) Or can I jump on teaching positions in universities just with my degrees?

 
Nov 12, 21 1:50 pm
Wood Guy

What do you want to teach? What level of teaching do you want to do?

Nov 12, 21 4:28 pm  · 
1  · 
square.

it's very easy to find part time teaching as an adjunct. full-time, however, is another story, which requires either having a significant body of work you can (and will continue to) put your name to (not just working on, as in your own firm), or a phd.

it was different in the old days and quite easy to find full-time teaching work without all of the horse and pony show, but in today's world of credentialism, you have to truly be exceptional (per definition of the architectural world, which yes is completely screwed up).

Nov 12, 21 4:33 pm  · 
3  · 
citizen

^ This, though I'd stop short of "very" easy. Architecture programs are frequently on the lookout for someone to teach a studio section, and the threshold is often cleared with a decent portfolio. There are plenty of upsides to this arrangement, but a full-time, secure livelihood it ain't.

Nov 12, 21 5:09 pm  · 
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square.

fair point.. i'll redact the "very"

Nov 13, 21 1:06 pm  · 
1  · 
whistler

Why do you do not want work as an architect, yet want to teach architecture? I am troubled that it sounds like you don't like the actual process of getting buildings designed and  executed and like the imaginary world of academia.

Not trying to be a dick but I like to think that having one foot in the "real" world affords you the information to be a better instructor.  I never trusted those who never built anything.  Design is great but Ideas needs to be tested out in real time and not just talked about!

Nov 12, 21 5:15 pm  · 
5  · 
maysixth

don't get me wrong, I like architecture. I just don't like the lifestyle of an architect. Also, I have always liked the theories that are usually hard to be implemented in the real world. From my own experience, most of the times in both studios and in big architecture firms, unless I own one. I understand what you mean, but student works, in exploring creativity than reality are also worth a lot. But the lifestyle is the big part of my decision.

Nov 13, 21 12:44 pm  · 
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square.

or at least a foot in the door for a significant amount of time before you leave it- i trust professors who, even if no longer in professional practice, had a long resume of professional work; i can see the value in full-time faculty who are entirely committed to their programs. very little experience however and i'm suspect like whistler.

Nov 13, 21 1:08 pm  · 
2  · 
square.

also, "theories that can't be implemented in the real world" don't belong in a discipline that is exclusively concerned with material things being built. as someone who teaches, i'm incredibly suspect of architecture "theory," whatever that means. for some disciplines, theory can be successfully isolated from praxis, but absolutely not in architecture.

Nov 13, 21 1:42 pm  · 
3  · 
monosierra

Theory in some schools have nothing at all to do with the practice of architecture - for the worse, I think. You'd be writing on architecture as a field of study rather than the profession of designing the built environment. Most likely, you'll be writing and curating exhibitions on other people who are doing the exact same thing. Then you organize symposiums and lectures to talk about what your friends/colleagues are talking about. Its a very small, insular circle. Topics include French philosophy, semantics, the idea and image of architecture, and whatever is in vogue in other academic circles ten years ago. Faculties looking for some newfangled lens to wrangle the idea of buildings came across OOO a few years back and milked it for a healthy number of symposiums and exhibitions.

Nov 13, 21 3:05 pm  · 
1  · 
maysixth

not sure I understand you completely, but i would love to slowly transition. In regards to theory, (not sure I understand you) but I meant it as - I work in one of the big named architecture studios, and I feel like I'm just a working robot, and I actually like looking at student works, though seem unrealistic in an architect/client's perspective. Whether or not theories can be implemented in practice, depends more on where you work I guess, or would not belong in this thread.

edit: I actually don't think we're all in terms with what architecture theory is? For I know, Rem is a master in analyzing theories, and history. Which could be explored more in the study, but would be kind of useless in firms, at least in my firm, which is already a named international studio. BUT that is not what I want to do in academia, I just don't feel like I can be an architect as in lifestyle, with my personal issues. 

Nov 13, 21 3:17 pm  · 
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trashbandicoot

You wouldn't need a PhD if you're just looking to teach at an adjunct level starting out. Plenty of places take on adjuncts although of course the catch is instability and lump sum with no promise of future courses. If you're aiming for tenure then definitely would need something to set yourself apart from the hundreds others that all want to remain in academia forever. Not an easier path if you thought this a leisurely alternative.

Depending on your location, start at junior colleges. Get some experience and see if you like it.

Nov 13, 21 3:23 pm  · 
1  · 
maysixth

Thanks @trashbandicoot, I was wondering if it would be easier if I do phd, to transition completely to academia.

Nov 13, 21 3:26 pm  · 
 · 
square.

on point monosierra with OOO - a philosophical concept, developed through real theoretical work, misapplied to architectural practices that serve to do nothing more than "distinguish" them as a brand, thus justifying their principals's place as tenured faculty. like you say, it's all one big circle jerk.

Nov 13, 21 4:19 pm  · 
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trashbandicoot

@maysixth There are so many degree programs and students now that a PhD track especially in this profession does not mean much as was already mentioned by others. Look at the case of humanities students applying for those few open spots every few years. Extremely competitive, everyone also has X and Y and Z on their CV.

You mentioned you don't want to spend more money so the traditional degree path may not be the first option (I figure a lot of schools will offer to sell you a degree). If you prefer to really just teach in general, find whatever promising opportunities to build on. If you want to be a full-time academic down the line, that's a different route. Maybe more chances in the building sciences than architectural theories. That Msc should help you in the technical/applied research side.

Nov 13, 21 6:25 pm  · 
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