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Post Your Work - Concrete

archanonymous

This week's "Post Your Work" thread theme is Concrete. 

Interior, Exterior, cool foundation shots, board-formed, floors, walls, domes, cast models from architecture school - whatcha got?

 
Jul 23, 21 11:50 am
archanonymous

I'll start since I was absent in the PYW Roofs thread. 


Here's a building I did with commercial sandwich panels and some nice board-formed site walls and signage:



Jul 23, 21 11:53 am  · 
7  · 
SneakyPete

Very clean. Nice work.

Jul 23, 21 12:22 pm  · 
 · 
Non Sequitur

can we get a close-up of that window detail for those of us at the back of the room?

Jul 23, 21 12:35 pm  · 
1  · 
archanonymous

Construction and finished. I have some even more detailed shots of weeps and welds but having trouble finding right now...



Jul 23, 21 1:23 pm  · 
3  · 
SneakyPete

Was there ever discussion of letting the raw edge stick out a bit beyond the face of the panel around the corner? Regardless, I really like it. Except for the surveillance, but that's not your fault at all.

Jul 23, 21 1:45 pm  · 
2  · 
archanonymous

That fuckin corner. :) 

Yeah, if you look at the other facades it is all about these East-West planes of concrete the slide past other infill materials, whether curtain wall, cement panel, or painted precast (like at the large gym volume.) The infill materials are always let back so you read the concrete as the primary structure that it is.

This was my first project as PA/ design architect and I went back and forth endlessly with the Principal/ Design Director on this very issue. We were so aligned on everything else. I thought the building had to follow it's own rules, he thought there should be one moment that broke them.

(This was a punch photo - they were still working on the mech screen)

Early diagram.

Jul 23, 21 5:30 pm  · 
4  · 
SneakyPete

lovely diagram.

Jul 23, 21 6:22 pm  · 
1  · 
tduds

Incidentally this is the same building I posted in the other Post Your Work thread. The project was a renovation of a late 40s office building. Existing conditions were drop grid ceiling and gyp walls everywhere. Pretty dark and soulless. We started pulling the walls back & realized the *entire building* was framed with board formed concrete. Just beautiful textures on every slab, wall, and column. 

We left about 75% of it exposed in the finished project. Pretty much everywhere except the exterior walls that we needed to insulate. Sometimes good design is knowing what not to do.


Jul 23, 21 12:57 pm  · 
6  · 
Non Sequitur

dude... you need to give a warning before you post something like that 2nd pic... some of are at work and don't have spare pants.

Jul 23, 21 1:01 pm  · 
8  · 
archanonymous

Sploosh. Nicely done.

Jul 23, 21 1:19 pm  · 
3  · 

Nicely done indeed. I love finding those types of things on renovation projects that can ultimately change the design strategy for the better.

That said, having worked for a while in an exposed concrete ceiling building, I hope you put some acoustic panels, baffles, clouds, or insulation of some type up there. Even a little can go a long way if it is placed in strategic locations.

Jul 23, 21 1:56 pm  · 
2  · 
SneakyPete

WHAT DID YOU SAY??

Jul 23, 21 2:07 pm  · 
4  · 
tduds

I just did the core & shell reno, but yeah the tenant put in some acoustic measures.

Jul 23, 21 2:22 pm  · 
3  · 
randomised

Nice job!

Jul 23, 21 3:53 pm  · 
1  · 
tduds

Thanks everybody.

Jul 23, 21 5:44 pm  · 
1  · 
x-jla

Nice!

Jul 23, 21 9:05 pm  · 
 · 
archanonymous

Don't want anyone to feel intimidated, so here's a less-good concrete pic. This was a real mess.


Jul 23, 21 6:14 pm  · 
5  · 
natematt

Photo is from construction, so it's a bit dirty, and they hadn't finished the beams yet, etc, but this had some fairly interesting reuse of stone from the the previous building's fireplace, which was something the client really wanted. 

The floor was also a radiant heat concrete floor. Little bit of an issue with some cracking at the corners despite all the control measures, but that's just how it goes. 


Jul 24, 21 4:32 am  · 
4  · 
archanonymous

That's pretty cool - I like re-using building materials where possible.

Jul 24, 21 8:29 am  · 
1  · 
Wood Guy

Nothing too exciting, but a current project is a big addition to the oldest house town, built in the late 1700s. It's the farmhouse for a 200-acre farm and the wood for the addition is all being cut from the farm and sawn on site. The movie, "On Golden Pond" was based on the families who have homes on each side of this place.

It was important to the owners for the addition to look old and to not overwhelm the house, but it had to include a huge, vaulted-ceiling kitchen/dining room. There is a brickledge that will accept antique granite foundation stones that will be sliced into veneer. The blank areas are for porches, which will have bluestone or slate floors and granite-faced foundation walls. 

Jul 25, 21 9:47 am  · 
3  · 
RJ87

This was before the decorative habitat inside of the tank was installed. Pretty much the entire viewing area was exposed concrete. The slab pour was continuous for over 20 hours.

Jul 28, 21 3:39 pm  · 
6  · 
RJ87

Drawing it was easy from a window detail perspective. But the difficulty was selecting waterproofing additives for the concrete & plugs for the formwork holes that wouldn't leak over time (optimally). There was a 30' tall test wall built outside in the staging area where we had different mixes, buff techniques & formwork tested out.

Jul 28, 21 4:13 pm  · 
3  · 

Do you recall what waterproofing additives were used?

Jul 28, 21 4:56 pm  · 
1  · 
archanonymous

Was this Miami?

Jul 28, 21 6:07 pm  · 
 · 

concrete slab is exposed on the interior

forming the slab for the cantilever

we made them, but didnt install them

Our first project as an office in tokyo, 12 years ago. The ground floor is concrete and the 2nd floor is wood with steel reinforcement here and there. The beam that supports the cantilever on the right side is reversed and built into a thickened wall that works as a shelf above the height of the beam. It was pretty cool to watch this go up and the concrete came out nicely. My partner and I made the concrete tiles ourselves to save a bit of money for the client. He hated it, I loved doing it.

Jul 31, 21 4:41 pm  · 
4  · 
randomised

Awesome project, love the tiles!

Jul 31, 21 5:05 pm  · 
 · 
archanonymous

Awesome tiles! The whole project is lovely too. Especially like the house # on the end of the beam.

Jul 31, 21 6:26 pm  · 
1  · 
randomised

Now that I think of it, have seen this published and rightfully so...

Aug 1, 21 3:28 am  · 
1  · 

yeah it did the rounds, right at that period when internet was rising and print was floundering. That was when we learned publication didnt really mean as much as we thought it might, although it was very cool, especially for a first project. We also learned that our first clients were amazing and open-minded outliers.

Aug 1, 21 11:15 am  · 
1  · 

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